Author Topic: Food Storage  (Read 12489 times)

Yowbarb

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Food Storage
« on: December 07, 2009, 08:35:54 AM »
Hi All, in the old forum in Ronnie James Topic Finding Foods in All The Survival Places, we had a thread called
Food storage data and ideas, MREs etc.

Please post here your bright ideas on long - term food storage.
Below is something from Be Prepared.com, in US.
http://beprepared.com/article.asp?ai=608&
MRE Information (referring to their product but may apply to most MREs:
Convenience Preparation Variety Storage Life
Meals-Ready-to-Eat were originally developed for the military. They are packaged in individual triple-layer foil and
plastic pouches--the secret behind their long storage life. MREs give you the variety and storage life you want in
food storage with the convenience and taste of everyday meals. They're also easy to add to your 72-hour kits for
on-the-go preparation. MREs don't require water or a can opener for preparation. Although they can be eaten cold,
most of the meals will taste better warmed up and can be heated a variety of ways, such as in the sun for 15 to
20
minutes, on a vehicle engine, in boiling water, emptied onto a plate and microwaved, or even by using your own body
heat in emergencies. During recent years, great attention has been focused on developing MREs that are as
hearty and wholesome as home cooking. Some great new additions have been added to the line-up.
Emergency Essentials offers
one of largest selections available in the preparedness market, and this month we even have several new
items. The storage life shown in the chart below was determined by food safety experts for the military. After a
range of tests, they discovered that MREs retain most of their taste and nutrition if rotated within 5 years and
stored in cool temperatures. The wide range of MRE
flavors available makes them a great storage addition.

MRE Storage Recommendations
Temperature (Fahrenheit) Months Storage
120

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2009, 09:08:41 AM »
I'm thinking of ways to protect glass and heavy plastic containers of water, bottles, jugs etc. during earth movements,
earthquakes etc.
I want to create a separate, connected dome for food storage and items to hide. The idea is concrete openings formed down
under the dome. Under these would be a concrete slab.
On the top would be handles or a place to set in a handle and open it up. I would want to find a way to hide and camophlage the containers. In there would be padded glass jars, bottles, etc.
Separate concrete boxes would have medical supplies, alcohol or anything else needed for survival and a target to be stolen or confiscated. I would set a removable floor over parts of it and put furniture etc.

The concrete storage that had glass and plastic jars etc. would have a strip of cardboard in between and padding under, in
between and over the rows of food.
As I said the containers could serve as hiding places too.

- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2009, 09:29:46 AM »
PS this whole food and etc. and hiding place dome would be buried under the earth.
I would prefer my domes to be at least partly buried and definitely camophlaged.
There are fake rocks and trees that can be set in over the buried domes. These should be flameproofed as much as possible.
A person can mold their own rock shapes to cover over the dome. small openings for camera perisope ventilation would be pretty much invisible from a surveillance place or by people at an distance.

Here is just one link of a company that sells the kids to form your own camophlage rocks. I've seen these for sale on survival sites, will have to look for them in sites I already posted on old forum.
http://www.ehow.com/how_4497652_do-cement-sculpting-garden.html  Ehow Do Cement Sculpting.
All The Best,

- Yowbarb


Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2010, 04:00:47 PM »
RE An underground greenhouses is one idea for food
Whatever is built will have to stand up to a lot. 

- Yowbarb
« Last Edit: March 31, 2010, 04:20:49 PM by Yowbarb »

1969quartz0

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2011, 05:06:18 PM »
Another great place to find good food at a cheap price is a Mormon cannery they do not push religion and have canning machines, with three people you are able to can 60+ #10 cans a hour All non GMO.
  http://www.providentliving.org/location/map/0,12566,2026-1-4,00.html
http://www.providentliving.org/pfw/multimedia/files/pfw/pdf/123005_BSS_HS_OrderForm_Jan2011US_ENG_pdf.pdf
My boys and I had a good time you have to set up a appointment no walk-ins.
I left a donation so they could give away 70 LBS of rice but you do not have to donate. you get a lot of food cheep and some of it is precanned it is about $0.15 more a can.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 05:31:55 AM by Nathan »

Linda

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2011, 06:57:15 PM »
Great information Nathan, thanks. I think I will see about going there.

Linda
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

augonit

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2011, 08:33:42 PM »
I'd like to know how to store potatoes long term, (like 4-6 months).

Montanabarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2011, 07:16:25 AM »
I'd like to know how to store potatoes long term, (like 4-6 months).

Auggie: I can only tell you how our family has done it for sixty years.  Maybe others have something to add.

Choose a dark, cool place, preferably a root cellar, as the temp changes very little underground. My parents put them either in gunny sacks (real hemp or cotton) or a bin.  Some people actually stored them in dirt, but I think that can make them sprout faster.  My storage is a dark, cool, wooden bin. It's kept at under 40 degrees. You need to break off sprouts as soon as possible, or they will wilt and shrink the potatoes. (You can save the sprouted ones for seed potatoes.)

You can freeze cooked potatoes if you have the freezer space, but not raw ones.  I cook five or ten pounds at a time, mash and whip them with seasonings, butter and cream, and freeze meal-sized portions in zip-lock bags or reusable containers. (We have our freezers on solar power so I have lots of room.)

The most important part is a dark place where the temperature is cool and constant. Most of the specs above also pertain to all "winter vegetables": squash, pumpkins, turnips, rutabagas, larger carrots, cabbage. Of course after five or six months, they start to look a little bedraggled, but at the end of a long winter, they taste great. BTW, canning all those listed is an option, if you have extra jars. And your chickens, rabbits and hogs really gobble up what's left.

augonit

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2011, 12:19:05 PM »
Montanabarb, I only have my basement.  I stored some and they did last for a while, but not all winter like I had hoped.  I thought you couldn't store them all dumped together like in a sack, but if you can alright!  Where can I get a gunny sack?

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2013, 02:14:12 PM »
http://www.survivalblog.com/ 

JWR Replies: Food storage lives do drop off dramatically, with higher temperatures. The following chart was developed by Natick Labs, summarizing the shelf life of the U.S. Military "Meal Ready to Eat" (MRE) rations. SurvivalBlog reader "Mr. Tango" (BTW, don't miss reading his fascinating profile) had a round of correspondence with the U.S. Army's Natick Laboratories in Massachusetts, on the potential storage life of MREs. The data that they sent him was surprising! Here is the gist of it:

                              
Degrees, Fahrenheit     Months of Storage (Years)   

120                                       1 month
110                                  5 months
100                                22 months             (1.8 years)
90                                55 months             (4.6 years)
80                                76 months             (6.3 years)
70                               100 months             (8.3 years)
60                               130 months             (10.8 years) -- See Note 3, below

See Note 3, below
 
Note 1: Figures above are based on date of pack, rather than inspection date.

Note 2: MREs near the end of their shelf life are considered safe to eat if:
    A.) They are palatable to the taste.
    B.) They do not show any signs of spoilage (such as swelled pouches.)
    C.) They have been stored at moderate temperatures. (70 degrees F or below.)
 
Note 3: Not enough data has yet been collected on storage below 60 degrees F. However projections are that the 130 month figure will be extended.

Note 4: Time and temperature have a cumulative effect. For example: storage at 100 degrees F for 11 months and then moved to 70 degrees F, you would lose one half of the 70 F storage life.

 Note 5: Avoid fluctuating temperatures in and out of freezing level.

Perhaps some SurvivalBlog readers have some suggestions. Other than digging a cold cellar, constructing a spring house, or building a large scale evaporative cooler, not much immediately comes to mind.
http://www.survivalblog.com/
« Last Edit: January 27, 2013, 02:17:46 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2013, 12:59:24 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Visit Off The Grid News for more survival articles
...
http://www.offthegridnews.com/2013/07/27/how-to-preserve-dairy-products-for-emergency-situations/#

How To Preserve Dairy Products For Emergency Situations

Written by: Carmen  Off-Grid Foods July 27, 2013   2 Comments
« Last Edit: August 01, 2013, 01:05:31 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2013, 11:02:18 AM »
I just saw this in my Facebook News Feed: This article about root cellaring looks like good one to print out... I am going to paste the article in the next post. The article is from Common Sense Homesteading
www.commonsensehome.com/ Using sound judgment to be more self-reliant. Gardening, recipes, how-to tips, herbalism, natural health, Preparedness, Green Home

...
Common Sense Homesteading
Root Cellaring - How to Store Over 30 Fruits and Vegetables Without Electricity

http://www.commonsensehome.com/root-cellars-101/


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Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2013, 11:05:09 AM »
Common Sense Homesteading

Root Cellaring - How to Store Over 30 Fruits and Vegetables Without Electricity

http://www.commonsensehome.com/root-cellars-101/
Root Cellaring - How to Store Over 30 Fruits and Vegetables Without Electricity

We built a root cellar under our front porch.  Typically, if you’re building new your porch floor is formed out of a concrete slab, you need to put a foundation wall under it anyway, so why not put this area to good use?  Even if you can’t deal with (or don’t want to deal with) traditional root cellaring (storing vegetables and fruit), you could use the space as a wine cellar, gun cabinet, place to brew beer, a battery room for your PV/Wind system or simply more storage.  I highly recommend including a root cellar as part of your emergency preparedness planning if you can, as it’s a great low-cost, no-energy way to store food and extend the shelf life of fresh produce.

Our root cellar measures about 8′x8′, which provides plenty of room for our stash of root veggies, plus gives a nice sized porch above.  We have simply shelving along the east wall (opposite the door) composed of rough cut 2″x8″ boards and cement blocks.  Produce that likes drier conditions (like onions, garlic and potatoes) is stored in trays on the shelves for better ventilation.  This way, if an onion or potato starts to go bad, they can be spotted and removed immediately before they spoil the whole batch.  My mom used to store hers in mesh sacks, but many times one bad roots would spoil a large number of those around it.  I cover the potatoes with burlap or landscape fabric or whatever else is handy to block out the light (and prevent green potatoes) but allow ventilation.  A few cabbage go on the top shelf, and apples go out in the garage.  Pumpkins and squash go on the floor of the canning pantry because they like it a little warmer and drier.

I store vegetables that need more moisture in buckets, bins or boxes packed with lightly dampened leaves.  For us this usually means beets and carrots (I overwinter parsnips out in the garden).  I tried packing these vegetables in sawdust and in sand, but prefer the leaves.  For me, sand stayed too moist and led to rotting, plus it made a terrible mess.  Sawdust was also very messy, but better than sand.  It really liked to cling in all the little root hairs.  The leaves provide moisture to keep your roots from shriveling up, but are easy to brush off with much less mess.  They can be recycled into the garden during the next planting season to enrich to the soil.  (I like to mix mine with the dirt I use to back fill my potato planting holes.  Leaves add acidity to the soil, which helps prevent scab on potatoes.)  Do use fresh leaves each year to prevent potential pathogen buildup.

Locating the root cellar outside the footprint of the home permits the root cellar to maintain cooler temperatures more easily than a cellar located within the house, but even if you have a pre-existing home you may be able to section off a portion of your basement with good results.  Using an exterior grade door (preferably insulated) on your root cellar also helps to maintain proper temperature (both in the root cellar and in the house).  If you are building new, consider putting the root cellar door in the back of an unheated storage room so that the temperature difference is less.  You can use this room to store veggies that require somewhat warmer and drier storage than a root cellar provides, as well as canned goods and whatever else you may need to stash.

Root cellars must have ventilation!  This is one of most common mistakes that people make when designing/installing them.  Proper ventilation moves the ethylene gas that causes spoilage away from the produce, increasing your storage time and the quality of the items in storage.  It also slows down molds and mildews and other fuzzy things that thrive in dark, damp, still environments.  You need the equivalent of a low and high 2” PVC pipe, preferably placed so as to bring in fresh air low on one side and to vent stale air out high on the opposite side.    Don’t skip the vent pipes if you’re building new, or at least their penetrations, even if you’re not sure you want to use the space for a root cellar.  You can always cap them off and they’re much more difficult to add later.

The root cellar should have no “standard” heating or cooling, other than a way to introduce outside air to cool the space. A “finished” floor is optional, and in fact a simple gravel floor is probably your best option for controlling humidity.  Root cellar produce keeps best with high humidity and cool temperatures.  A gravel floor introduces ground moisture and allows you to sprinkle the floor to add moisture when needed.  A single incandescent light (switched on exterior) should provide adequate lighting (unless your room is really huge) and, if for some reason your storage gets too cold, you can always use it to introduce a little heat.

The best resource we have found on root cellars is the book  Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables by Mike and Nancy Bubel.  No matter what your location or how much space you have, the Bubels are likely to have a root cellar option that will work for you.  It contains detailed explanations of how to store vegetables and fruits without electricity with specific temperature and humidity recommendations for each variety.  There are also good photos and diagrams, which I really like

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2013, 11:15:35 AM »
Here are some Links on food storage info, from Common Sense Homesteading. - Yowbarb
http://www.commonsensehome.com/root-cellars-101/


Yakhchal – Ancient natural refrigerators – who knew?    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakhchal

Keep Your Ice Cream Cold Without Electricity – Nifty article on a home built refrigerator substitute that uses no electricity or fuel:
http://fourmileisland.com/IceBox.htm

Build a Basement Root Cellar by Steve Maxwell – Article from Mother Earth News:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/basement-root-cellar-zm0z04zsie.aspx#axzz2RPGtTycy

A Root Cellar for Your Homestead  by Victoria Ries – Some basic information on the cellar, more information on the proper storage of the fruits and veggies themselves.
http://oldfashionedliving.com/rootcellar.html

The University of Missouri Extension Office suggests the following guidelines for storing food in root cellars:
http://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPub.aspx?P=MP562

Yowbarb Note: This article will be copied and posted in the next post.

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Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2013, 11:36:48 AM »
U of Missouri Extension - Agriculture - Home Storage of Fruits and Vegetables in Root Cellars

http://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPub.aspx?P=MP562

Home Storage of Fruits and Vegetables in Root Cellars
Barbara Willenberg
Extension assistant
Karla Hughes
State food and nutrition specialist
Use this chart as a quick reference. For more detailed information about constructing and using a root cellar,
check the references listed or call your local county extension center.

Root Cellar storage requirements

Apples
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with vegetables
•   32 to 40 degrees Farenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Beans, dry
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   32 to 50 degrees Farenheit
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Beets
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Farenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Brussels sprouts
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Farenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cabbage
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cabbage, Chinese
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity
Carrots
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Cauliflower
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Celeriac
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Celery
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Endive (Escarole)
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Garlic
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   32 to 35 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Grapefruit
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with vegetables
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Grapes
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with vegetables
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Horseradish
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity
•   May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless
the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.

Jerusalem artichoke
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity
•   May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless
the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.

Kale
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Kohlrabi
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Leeks
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Onions
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   32 to 35 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Oranges
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with vegetables
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Parsnips
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Pears
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with vegetables
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Peas
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   Airtight container
•   32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Peppers, hot dried
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Popcorn
•   Cool and dry
•   Home and commercially prepared foods also need a cool, dry storage place
•   Airtight container
•   32 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
•   60 to 70 percent relative humidity

Potatoes
•   Cold and moist
•   Do not store with fruits
•   38 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit ideal
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Potatoes, sweet
•   Warm and moist
•   To keep sweet potatoes from spoiling in warm and moist storage, do not let
temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Pumpkins
•   Warm and dry
•   50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
•   60 to 75 percent relative humidity

Radish, winter
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Rutabaga
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Salsify, oyster plant
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity
•   May be left in the ground undisturbed until needed. Digging can be done unless
the soil is frozen hard. A thick layer of mulch may extend your harvest season.
         
Squash, winter
•   Warm and dry
•   50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
•   60 to 75 percent relative humidity

Tomatoes
•   Warm and moist
•   To keep green tomatoes from spoiling in warm and moist storage, do not let
temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit
•   80 to 90 percent relative humidity

Turnip
•   Cold and very moist
•   32 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit
•   90 to 95 percent relative humidity

Note
Storing foods in a root cellar makes it possible to eat fresh fruits and vegetables from the
home garden well into the winter months.
The length of time that fruits and vegetables keep well in root cellars depends on several
factors:
•   Early or late crops (late-maturing crops store better)
•   Storage conditions (less-than-ideal conditions shorten storage life)
•   Fruit and vegetable condition at storage time (proper curing of damage-free produce
results in longer storage life).
Vegetables and fruits should not be stored together even though temperatures and moisture
requirements are similar. As fruits such as apples and pears ripen, they give off ethylene gas
which decreases the storage life of vegetables. This is especially evident with potatoes which
sprout early if stored near certain fruits. Also, the odor of strong smelling vegetables, like turnips
and cabbage, can be absorbed by fruits and other vegetables. Store them away from other food
and where the odor cannot waft into the house.
Do not allow fruits and vegetables to freeze.
References
•   Bubel M., and Bubel N., Root Cellaring, Rodale Press, Emmaus, PA, 1979.
•   Hartzberg, R., Vaughan, B. and Greene, J., The New Putting Food By,
Stephen Greene Press, Brattleboro, VT, 1982.

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