Author Topic: Food Storage  (Read 12574 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2013, 09:26:26 AM »
I'm not plugging any particular site or product. This looks like it could be a good guide to food storage basics,
Yowbarb


Food Storage and Preparedness E-book Sale
 
2013-08-19 23:03:02-04
4 Food Storage and Preparedness E-books – only $10.95 from August 19th-26th With no Spam or MREs in site, these four books will help you stock your pantry with real, quality food you’ll enjoy daily and easy to prepare items for emergencies.  Feed your family food you can trust at an affordable price – these [...]
The post Food Storage and Preparedness E-book Sale appeared first on Common Sense Homesteading.


Read more at Common Sense Home...   http://www.commonsensehome.com/food-storage-and-preparedness-e-book-sale/


Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 04:57:44 PM »
BK has posted some food ideas in another Topic.
- Yowbarb
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Re: Survival List Example
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2011, 07:29:53 PM
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=916.15

Keep in mind under the Food section
For the ones that are in their fixed location Root Crops will hold for a long time.

•   Potatoes
•   Onions
at room temp away from light

•   Carrots
•   Cabbage
•   Beets
•   Turnips
with proper storage temps (basement or root cellar) they could last for months.
•   Hard fruit
•   Apples
•   Pears
•   Citrus
•   Oranges
•   Lemons
•   Grapefruit
All would last a few weeks or more to make your stash last longer.
Also for those in location start planting so they can be ready to produce in a few years.
•   Fruit & Nut trees
•   Cane bushes (Blackberry/Raspberry)
•   Blueberry

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2013, 10:21:41 AM »
Next 2-4 posts will be Common Sense Homesteading articles on meat canning.
Probably worth printing out.
This info should prove useful now and also later, in the Aftertime...Those of you who are lucky enough to have
fish and game, and the time to stock up, probably know all this. Good info to have, generally...
- Yowbarb
............................................................................................
http://www.simplycanning.com/canning-meat.html

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Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2013, 10:41:20 AM »
http://www.simplycanning.com/canning-meat.html

Canning Venison

Ground and cooked before processing
 
These directions are for canning venison ground. These directions will work for canning beef, pork, elk or venison.
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Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2013, 06:41:30 PM »
I think it is good to store tea.  I drink coffee in the mornings now, but if TSHTF we will appreciate the comfort of a cup of hot tea.  And herbal teas can have a health benefit in addition to simply being a nice warm beverage.  And tea bags do not take up much room and you can store a variety of them.

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2013, 05:10:09 PM »
I think it is good to store tea.  I drink coffee in the mornings now, but if TSHTF we will appreciate the comfort of a cup of hot tea.  And herbal teas can have a health benefit in addition to simply being a nice warm beverage.  And tea bags do not take up much room and you can store a variety of them.

Endtimesgal, it's funny I have been thinking about tea lately.
I used to drink tea almost exclusively then drank tea and also coffee substitutes.
When I went back to coffee big time, I sort of didn't leave room for tea in my life.
Certainly no reason why a person can't drink both.  :)
There is a really nice vibration that goes along with tea, Thanks for reminding me...
.......

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2013, 03:59:13 PM »
http://www.survivalbased.com/survival-blog/2020/10-food-items-to-always-have-in-storage

10 Food Items to Always Have In Storage

Posted on September 19, 2013 by Catherine Alford There have been 1 comment(s)
It’s always a great feeling to be prepared when it comes to the food in your home. Whether you are bracing for a potential natural disaster or simply readying yourself for a hungry toddler, having these 10 food items always on hand will make your life easier and your house a little bit more self sustaining.

1. Honey
The best thing about honey is that it never goes bad. It can actually withstand broad temperature variations, and you can use it to sweeten just about anything. If it crystallizes, just reheat it, and it’s good as new.

2. Sugar, Salt, & Pepper
Although these items can cake up, they won’t go bad. Plus, you can use them to flavor absolutely anything. The best part is that in a pinch (get it? A pinch?) you can use salt for curing and medicinally.

3. Nuts, Nut Butter, and Trail Mixes
We always try to have trail mix on hand in my house because it is a fantastic source of protein and fat. You don’t have to refrigerate it, and it’s a good source of healthy energy too.

4. Canned Meat
You can get canned tuna, chicken, salmon, and turkey. Although they are not the healthiest choices and do expire eventually, they are excellent if you really need them.

5. Bottled Water
Sure it’s more of a beverage than a food item, but you still need about 1 gallon per person per day both for drinking and to help you maintain proper hygiene.

6. Rice and Pastas
Rice and pasta are both great sources of carbohydrates. They are really easy to prepare and have a very long shelf life.

7. Canned Fruit & Vegetables
Similar to canned meat, these are not always the healthiest choice because they have a lot of added sugar. However, you can them alongside of meat to create a well balanced meal and get much needed vitamins and minerals in your diet.

8. Flour and Dried Grains
Oatmeal, wheat, and cornmeal can all be used for baking. They are easy to prepare and contain may essential nutrients that your body needs.

9. Dried Milk
Dried milk is actually not as bad as it sounds, and it works really well if you can’t get fresh milk. It has a long shelf life and can be used to drink or in baking.

10. Powdered Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa
These have always been staples in people’s kitchens. After all, how many people do you know who can barely start the day without their cup of coffee? They don’t provide much nutritional value, but the psychological impact is important too!
Of course, if you want to be fully prepared, don’t forget to stock a can opener, a small camping stove, and emergency food for your pets as well just in case you need it.

How many of you currently have these items on hand? What are some foods that you can’t possibly live without?

...................


Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2013, 10:22:52 AM »
('scuse it, had to edit.) Yowbarb Note:
IMHO, a lot of people will be able to tolerate a simple, repetitive diet if you have plenty of the following items on hand.
These things just make life worth living, for a lot of people.


Coffee...................whole beans, grinder and also plenty of instant packets
Tea.......................some people just cannot do without their tea.
Sugar....................it's not time to be a purist keep it on hand for your group...
Milk.......................dried whole milk and also canned evaporated milk
Salad dressings.......various types.  These can jazz up a bland meal, things like canned beans.
                             Example: Canned Italian beans with dressing. Dressing is Mrs. Dash, olive oil and lemon juice.
                             Not everyone will like this but (yumm) it is actually quite tasty. Kids not likely to eat it.
Lemon juice............yes fresh is better but always keep some of the bottled kind.
Cocoa powder..........warm cocoa is one of those soothing comfort foods.
                              A little bit of chocolate actually helps with blood fat and adds to survival
{Mac and Cheese, peanut butter, honey, crackers; ravioli etc.} for kids
Condiments.............Catsup, mustard, cayenne hot sauce...some people can barely get down a meal without these.
http://wearenotfoodies.com/condiment-conundrum.html
Wine, beer..............Some people cannot handle alcohol,
.............................but many people will mellow out with a little bit of wine or beer...
.......


Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2013, 10:50:13 AM »
Good suggestions Barb. 

I was sent an old link from a Glen Beck show which led me to a list of his for emergency foods.  This list is only meant for a couple of weeks, to be used right after a disaster which takes out the ability to cook food with electricity. Some of these items will require heating up, so one has to think of how to do that.  A camp stove would be ideal.  Everyone should have one on hand.    This list is good for short term use which would give one the freedom to focus on other things instead of the urgent need to figure out what to eat. Most of these foods require no, or very little water.  It may not be the most palatable diet, but would sustain a person and fill the stomach.

The first item is bottled water.  He suggests one start washing and filling up one liter bottles once they are empty of soda.  I myself store water in empty milk jugs which I thoroughly wash out and then I add a couple of drops of chlorine bleach.  Of course one can purchase cases of water pretty inexpensively, but this list is for people on limited budgets, and is meant to be as inexpensive as possible.

Energy bars, Almonds, Peanut Butter, Tuna packages, Canned meals with pasta, Canned Chili,  Canned vegetables, Dried and canned fruit, dry milk, instant coffee,  Cocoa powder, V-8 Juice, Canned soups that do not require additional water, Paper Plates and utensils, Powdered Tang, Powdered Kool-aid.

He also suggests we have a good supply of chocolate bars, which will give pleasure when eaten, like a little treat, and I think this is a great idea.

Here is the link to the information:  http://www.glennbeck.com/content/articles/article/198/48306/




Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2013, 11:42:19 AM »
Good suggestions Barb. 

I was sent an old link from a Glen Beck show which led me to a list of his for emergency foods.  This list is only meant for a couple of weeks, to be used right after a disaster which takes out the ability to cook food with electricity. Some of these items will require heating up, so one has to think of how to do that.  A camp stove would be ideal.  Everyone should have one on hand.    This list is good for short term use which would give one the freedom to focus on other things instead of the urgent need to figure out what to eat. Most of these foods require no, or very little water.  It may not be the most palatable diet, but would sustain a person and fill the stomach.

The first item is bottled water.  He suggests one start washing and filling up one liter bottles once they are empty of soda.  I myself store water in empty milk jugs which I thoroughly wash out and then I add a couple of drops of chlorine bleach.  Of course one can purchase cases of water pretty inexpensively, but this list is for people on limited budgets, and is meant to be as inexpensive as possible.

Energy bars, Almonds, Peanut Butter, Tuna packages, Canned meals with pasta, Canned Chili,  Canned vegetables, Dried and canned fruit, dry milk, instant coffee,  Cocoa powder, V-8 Juice, Canned soups that do not require additional water, Paper Plates and utensils, Powdered Tang, Powdered Kool-aid.

He also suggests we have a good supply of chocolate bars, which will give pleasure when eaten, like a little treat, and I think this is a great idea.

Here is the link to the information:  http://www.glennbeck.com/content/articles/article/198/48306/

All good ideas,
Thanks!

Yowbarb

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2013, 08:40:27 PM »
Town Hall Member JustWright61 found this article in Off The Grid News.
Good info to have.
- Yowbarb
...
http://www.offthegridnews.com/2013/10/23/about-storing-wheat-and-flour/   Off The Grid News, Storing Wheat and Flour

About Storing Wheat and Flour  Video on page.

Written by: OTGN Video Editor  Videos October 23, 2013   16 Comments

October 23, 2013


Endtimesgal_2012

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Purchasing Spices and Herbs in Bulk
« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2013, 09:11:16 AM »
How many people ever think about purchasing spices and herbs in bulk?  Here in the Pacific Northwest, we have several stores who sell food in bulk.  I love purchasing in bulk, you are able to get as little or as much as you want.  It is much less expensive, and I keep my spices in these great spice jars I purchased at the Dollar store.  Yes, it was an investment, but I can use them over and over.  I used a label maker and it worked great.  Then I went to Walmart and purchased a little stacked shelf unit for under $10 and my jars fit great on the shelves and I am able to see exactly where the bottle I want is located.  I like to keep my spices fresh, so I do not purchase in large quantities, but of course one could do that and store them in pint jars as well.  You will only pay pennies for each spice, it is amazing.

bk

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2013, 03:59:39 PM »
Barb here are a copy of pdf files on proper storage and hold times.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/store/wisc_vegetables.pdf


http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/store/ksu_cupboard.pdf

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2013, 07:34:02 AM »
I cannot but wonder if these storage dates are a bit conservative.  I personally have stored food stuff a lot longer with no adverse effects.

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Re: Food Storage
« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2013, 01:44:23 PM »
You know how it is now with everyone wanted to sue someone at the drop of a hat.

Now days they have to CYA so no one sues them if they ate bad food.