Author Topic: Food Storage  (Read 12510 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30413
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2015, 01:00:43 AM »
Yowbarb Note: This is the fellow who put on the Survival Summits and presented a lot of free videos and info on many aspects of survival.
Click link below to receive free CDs on preserving food. Just costs shipping and handling.

http://theprepperproject.com/FoodSafety/?utm_source=facebookads&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Likes-American-Preppers-Network-mf35plus

Discover 11 Clever Methods For Preserving Food Without Electricity

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30413
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2015, 01:03:16 AM »
PS the free videos, see previous post.

Note from Chet Womach: Why I'm giving away these CD's for just shipping

http://theprepperproject.com/FoodSafety/?utm_source=facebookads&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Likes-American-Preppers-Network-mf35plus

Why I'm giving away these CD's for just shipping

You may be wondering why I'm giving these CD's away for free + $2.95 shipping if they really are as good as I say they are. That's a great question and the reason I'll admit is a Selfish one.

You see, these CD's were recorded as part of a 7 Day Seminar Series I recorded called, The Survival Summit. A product that we recorded and offer for sale for $49.95. But instead of trying to talk you into how amazing those recordings are, I figured it would be easier to let you simply have one of them for free so you could see for yourself, in the hopes that if you do like it, you might come back and buy the full set of recordings from us in the future.

The full set of recordings covers many other survival topics like...

Survival Trapping Strategies
How to become an Herbal Medic
Techniques for Stopping Traumatic Bleeding
Urban Foraging Tactics
How to make more accurate decisions in life and death scenarios
And about 35 other topics along the same lines

If that sounds interesting to you, and you'd like to simply buy the full recordings of that even now click here https://theprepperproject.clickfunnels.com/order-form3799511

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30413
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #47 on: February 21, 2016, 01:26:01 AM »
http://www.ready.gov/food

Using Dry Ice:  Image, Close up of pellets of dry ice
•Under normal circumstances you should not keep dry ice in your freezer. If your freezer is functioning properly it will cause the unit to become too cold and your freezer may shut off. However, if you lose power for an extended period of time, dry ice is the best ways to keep things cold.
•Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a 10-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days.
•If you use dry ice to keep your food cold, make sure it does not come in direct contact with the food.
•Use care when handling dry ice, wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Karma: +15/-0
Re: Food Storage : Long-term storage of fresh fruit
« Reply #48 on: August 28, 2017, 09:46:24 AM »
In this house, we're planning to eat lots of inexpensive pancake breakfasts from storage food, so to avoid food fatigue, I thought it would be nice to have a little fresh fruit to go with them, maybe 1/4 C per person.  With 4 in the family, a pint jar would feed us twice, or could be shared with neighbors.  One wouldn't necessarily need fresh fruit every day in a survival situation; maybe twice or so per week would help to break up the monotony and provide phytonutrients.

When I say "fresh" in a canning situation, I'm referring to the use of alcohol instead of using the water bath or pressure canner.  If you don't have your own fruit, this is a good time to visit the farm markets and strike a bargain, as they must move the fruit out quickly or it will perish.  I got a large crate of near-perfect peaches from an Amishman for half of what he normally sells them for, $20 instead of $40.  Then I found gallon jugs of blackberry wine (you could substitute elderberry, brandy, etc.) for under $15 per jug, and went through about 2 1/2 jugs.  It's more expensive than just buying fresh fruit, but if none exists or will exist for a very long time, the extra expense weighed against good health might be negligible.  I don't count the expense of the canning jars themselves, because they are reusable and are always kept on-hand.  About half of the peaches were used for 2 dozen of the jars, as the rest contained berries.  The peaches used cost $10 for fruit and around $20 for wine, bringing my cost to $1.25 per packed jar.

Today we made up 4 dozen jars of berries and sliced peaches.  Need a very sharp knife to do the peaches, and a wide mouth canning funnel helps.  Rather than allowing head-space at the jar tops, it might be best with the fruit to fill them with alcohol just shy of the tops, say 1/8" allowing a little clearance so the alcohol doesn't degrade the rubber edge coating.  Bands should be tightened as far as possible, and then the jars turned upside down and right side up several times to allow the alcohol plenty of contact with that bit of fruit that won't stay down beneath the liquid line. 

Lastly, the jars will need to be wrapped in bubble wrap and packed in sealed buckets down in the root cellar.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30413
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #49 on: August 28, 2017, 12:45:37 PM »
R.R. -
What wonderful ideas! I also like the idea of using up the inexpensive storage items, pancake mixes, flour etc.
and adding your canned fruits.
Awesome that you are continuing to do the canning.
All The Best,
Barb T.

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1770
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Food Storage : Long-term storage of fresh fruit
« Reply #50 on: August 28, 2017, 03:22:05 PM »
In this house, we're planning to eat lots of inexpensive pancake breakfasts from storage food, so to avoid food fatigue, I thought it would be nice to have a little fresh fruit to go with them, maybe 1/4 C per person.  With 4 in the family, a pint jar would feed us twice, or could be shared with neighbors.  One wouldn't necessarily need fresh fruit every day in a survival situation; maybe twice or so per week would help to break up the monotony and provide phytonutrients.

When I say "fresh" in a canning situation, I'm referring to the use of alcohol instead of using the water bath or pressure canner.  If you don't have your own fruit, this is a good time to visit the farm markets and strike a bargain, as they must move the fruit out quickly or it will perish.  I got a large crate of near-perfect peaches from an Amishman for half of what he normally sells them for, $20 instead of $40.  Then I found gallon jugs of blackberry wine (you could substitute elderberry, brandy, etc.) for under $15 per jug, and went through about 2 1/2 jugs.  It's more expensive than just buying fresh fruit, but if none exists or will exist for a very long time, the extra expense weighed against good health might be negligible.  I don't count the expense of the canning jars themselves, because they are reusable and are always kept on-hand.  About half of the peaches were used for 2 dozen of the jars, as the rest contained berries.  The peaches used cost $10 for fruit and around $20 for wine, bringing my cost to $1.25 per packed jar.

Today we made up 4 dozen jars of berries and sliced peaches.  Need a very sharp knife to do the peaches, and a wide mouth canning funnel helps.  Rather than allowing head-space at the jar tops, it might be best with the fruit to fill them with alcohol just shy of the tops, say 1/8" allowing a little clearance so the alcohol doesn't degrade the rubber edge coating.  Bands should be tightened as far as possible, and then the jars turned upside down and right side up several times to allow the alcohol plenty of contact with that bit of fruit that won't stay down beneath the liquid line. 

Lastly, the jars will need to be wrapped in bubble wrap and packed in sealed buckets down in the root cellar.
So, you're not heating the jars, but filling them with fruit and alcohol (such as wine or ?) and then directly to storage? 

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Karma: +15/-0
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #51 on: August 28, 2017, 04:24:07 PM »
That's right, using alcohol allows you to completely bypass heat processing, and the work goes very quickly. :)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Karma: +15/-0
Re: Food Storage
« Reply #52 on: September 07, 2017, 06:02:11 PM »
Posting an addendum:

After tightening the bands and shaking upside-down a bit to coat everything with the alcohol, then turning jars right-side-up for storage, it's important to loosen the bands back up a bit, as the wine will off-gas some and put pressure on the jars.  Just don't want anyone to have a jar explode on them, though it hasn't happened here yet :)
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 06:23:28 PM by R.R. Book »