Author Topic: Native American Survival Wisdom  (Read 6399 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2010, 04:58:57 PM »

Native American Food Ingredients from http://nativechefs.com   4:14 6,380 Views
pikuniboy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sH051CKI4fg

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2010, 06:55:46 AM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpODvp9A5rQ   That's survival wisdom.

I will be back with more info I find...




« Last Edit: October 17, 2011, 09:31:39 PM by chaunska »

chaunska

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2011, 09:39:42 PM »
A good tool to kill small game with is called a rabbit stick.   It's shaped like a boomerang, but a little longer on one side and scraped on both sides as to make is a little flattened, but not nearly as flat or thin as a boomerang....about a little more than 1/2 thick.   With some practice, you can hit anything with it.   It is faster than an ordinary stick and you don't have to be as much of a marksman as with chucking stones.  Throw it sideways at the animal, or slightly angled if your pretty close.   Women and children used these all the time for killing small game to eat.http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_WdyPXq5eKX8/SoM9-4F-R_I/AAAAAAAABuo/ED7aXeV35Rk/s1600-h/rabbit+stick+thrower.jpg

terrypat

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2011, 06:15:12 AM »
Nice to see all these old skills being covered. Thanks Chaunska.
You have been telling people that this is the 11th hour.

Now you must go back & tell people  this  is  "The Hour" .

The Elders , Oraibi Arizona, Hopi Nation

Georgia B

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2011, 11:13:35 AM »
Hello to all: 

  A friend sent me Today's Meditation from the Elders on www.whitebison.org.
Sharing this with anyone who might be interested .
  The link for the Daily Meditations is in the upper right-hand corner of the Home Page.

  I appreciated the Native American message of Brotherhood of Believers.
I hope you find this to be  supportive encouragement.

  Thank you to everyone who contributes to TH-- I still feel like a newbie and am eagerly reading posts daily.
You guys and gals are the Best !!
Love, Light and Life to all. 

terrypat

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2011, 11:29:50 AM »
Thanks Georgia for the link. Looks like it is loaded with good info.
You have been telling people that this is the 11th hour.

Now you must go back & tell people  this  is  "The Hour" .

The Elders , Oraibi Arizona, Hopi Nation

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2011, 12:47:33 AM »
Hello to all: 

  A friend sent me Today's Meditation from the Elders on www.whitebison.org.
Sharing this with anyone who might be interested .
  The link for the Daily Meditations is in the upper right-hand corner of the Home Page.

  I appreciated the Native American message of Brotherhood of Believers.
I hope you find this to be  supportive encouragement.

  Thank you to everyone who contributes to TH-- I still feel like a newbie and am eagerly reading posts daily.
You guys and gals are the Best !!
Love, Light and Life to all. 



Hello Georgia B.  :)
I'm not sure why you didn't have any applauds before, anyway you just got one from me.
We can only give one at a time.
thanks for the link and the good thoughts,
Yowbarb

chaunska

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2011, 10:34:37 PM »
In the old days, there was a game that boys played.   They would go out late in the morning once it started getting cold, completely naked and run around.   They would do chores, like gathering the horses from overnight pasture and see who could stay out longest.   It became quite a competitive contest between them. 

What does this have to do with survival?  Well, in the late fall, we cover our bodies with more clothes and the sun doesn't get to our skin.   The sun is responsible for helping our bodies create Vitamin D.   This vitamin is very important in the fight against viruses, particularly influenza.   The way this works is the natural oils in our skin exposed to direct sunlight produces the vitamin D.   The longer these exposed oils remain on the skin, the more vitamin D is absorbed into our bodies.   One hour spent naked in direct sunlight produces 50,000 IU of vitamin D.   

So this game that boys played helped them to boost their immune systems.    :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2012, 08:16:57 AM »
Medicine Man - Black Elk's story of The Great Circle   3:39

VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/FKu-Iv9DlK8

Uploaded by LimitlessThinker on Mar 27, 2009
Black Elk (Hehaka Sapa) (c. December 1863 August 17 or August 19, 1950 (sources differ) was a famous Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). He was Heyoka and a second cousin of Crazy Horse. Black Elk participated, at about the age of twelve, in the Battle of Little Big Horn of 1876, and was injured in the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. In 1887, Black Elk traveled to England with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

The Great Circle

You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round. In the old days when we were a strong and happy people, all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation, and so long as the hoop was unbroken, the people flourished. The flowering tree was the living center of the hoop, and the circle of the four quarters nourished it. The east gave peace and light, the south gave warmth, the west gave rain, and the north with its cold and mighty wind gave strength and endurance.

This knowledge came to us from the outer world with our religion. Everything the Power of the World does is done in a circle. The sky is round, and I have heard that the earth is round like a ball, and so are all the stars. The wind, in its greatest power, whirls. Birds make their nests in circles, for theirs is the same religion as ours. The sun comes forth and goes down again in a circle. The moon does the same, and both are round. Even the seasons form a great circle in their changing, and always come back again to where they were. The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood, and so it is in everything where power moves. Our teepees were round like the nests of birds, and these were always set in a circle, the nation's hoop, a nest of many nests, where the Great Spirit meant for us to hatch our children.

Black Elk - Oglala Sioux

Source of available pictures for use at::
http://www.firstpeople.us
American Indians
First People is a child friendly site about American and Canadian Indians. 1400+ legends, 400+ agreements and treaties, 10,000+ pictures, free clipart, Pueblo pottery, American Indian jewelry, Native American Flutes and more.

Music was taken from free downloads at:
http://music.download.com

Music by D Analihi song: Raise to the Spirits

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #24 on: September 19, 2012, 03:12:04 PM »
Augonit thanks for starting this topic. Not remembering what happened.  ???
Why not reapply, if you see this.
- Barb Townsend
...

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2012, 03:22:02 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Dr. Don Warne, Oglala Lakota. His videos on the Medicine Wheel are below.
...


The Medicine Wheel - 1 of 3   9:21   102,042 Views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/fIGrFHy463g

Published on Apr 18, 2012 by Goran Mlinar
...
The Medicine Wheel - 2 of 3   8:28

http://youtu.be/tK-RdmQwIvI

...
The Medicine Wheel - 3 of 3   8:40

http://youtu.be/gwORm7dCBVc                                                           

....................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine_wheel  The Medicine Wheel
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« Last Edit: September 19, 2012, 03:25:06 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American Survival Wisdom
« Reply #26 on: July 02, 2013, 09:40:38 AM »
http://astore.amazon.com/wwwnativechan-20/search/104-3445142-4257535?node=14&keywords=native+american+medicine

http://www.native-american-online.org/native-american-medicine.html

Native American Medicine
 
First and foremost ,  "WARNING"   if you are looking for a spiritual teacher, medicine man,  medicine woman or shaman on the internet, you are looking to be taken for a ride and lose time and money to a charlatan. if you happen across one on our chat, tell us and we will kill them off the server! "administrator native-American-online"

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http://www.native-american-online.org/store.html
According to Ken "Bear Hawk" Cohen, "Native American Medicine is based on widely held beliefs about healthy living, the repercussions of disease-producing behavior, and the spiritual principles that restore balance." These beliefs are shared by all tribes; however, the methods of diagnosis and treatment vary greatly from tribe to tribe and healer to healer.

Origins
The healing traditions of Native Americans have been practiced in North America since at least 12,000 years ago and possibly as early as 40,000 years ago. Although the term Native American Medicine implies that there is a standard system of healing, there are approximately 500 nations of indigenous people in North America, each representing a diverse wealth of healing knowledge, rituals, and ceremonies.

Many aspects of Native American healing have been kept secret and are not written down. The traditions are passed down by word of mouth from elders, from the spirits in vision quests, and through initiation. It is believed that sharing healing knowledge too readily or casually will weaken the spiritual power of the medicine.

There are, however, many Native American healers who recognize that writing down their healing practices is a way to preserve these traditions for future generations. Many also believe that sharing their healing ways and values may help all people to come into a healthier balance with nature and all forms of life.
Benefits

Native American Medicine can benefit anyone who sincerely wishes to live a life of wholeness and balance. These benefits may be physical, emotional, or spiritual. There is, however, the understanding that "the diseases of civilization," or white man's diseases, often need white man's medicine. In those cases, Native American medicine can be an important part of an integrative approach to healing. For example, the most successful programs for treating alcohol addiction in Native communities have combined Western approaches to psychological counseling, social work, and traditional Native American healing practices.
 Such inherited conditions as birth defects or retardation are not easily treatable with Native American medicine. Native healers also believe that some illnesses are the result of a patient's behavior. Sometimes they will not treat a person because they do not want to interfere with the life lessons the patient needs to learn. Other illnesses are not treated because they are "callings" or initiation diseases. Native healer Medicine Grizzly Bear Lake explains, "The calling comes in the form of a dream, accident, sickness, injury, disease, near-death experience, or even actual death."

Description

Native American Medicine is based upon a spiritual view of life. A healthy person is someone who has a sense of purpose and follows the guidance of the Great Spirit. This guidance is written upon the heart of every person. To be healthy, a person must be committed to a path of beauty, harmony, and balance. Gratitude, respect, and generosity are also considered to be essential for a healthy life. Ken Cohen writes, "Health means restoring the body, mind, and spirit to balance and wholeness: the balance of life energy in the body; the balance of ethical, reasonable, and just behavior; balanced relations within family and community; and harmonious relationships with nature."
   
Theories of disease causation and even the names of diseases vary from tribe to tribe. Diseases may be thought to have internal or external causes or sometimes both. According to Cherokee medicine man Rolling Thunder, negative thinking is the most important internal cause of disease. Negative thinking includes not only negative thoughts about oneself but also feelings of shame, blame, low self-esteem, greed, despair, worry, depression, anger, jealousy, and self-centeredness. Johnny Moses, a Nootka healer, says "No evil sorcerer can do as much harm to you as you can do to yourself."
 Diseases have external causes too. "Germs are also spirits," according to Shabari Bird of the Lakota Nation. A person is particularly susceptible to harmful germs if they live an imbalanced life, have a weak constitution, engage in negative thinking, or are under a lot of stress. Other people or spirits may also be responsible for an illness.

Another external source of disease is environmental poisons. These poisons include alcohol, impure air, water, and some types of food.

Native American healers believe that disease can also be caused by physical, emotional, or spiritual trauma. These traumas can lead to mental and emotional distress, loss of soul, or loss of spiritual power. In these cases the healer must use ritual and other ways to physically return the soul and power to the patient. Some diseases are caused when people break the "rules for living." These rules may include ways of showing respect for animals, people, places, ritual objects, events, or spirits.
Native American healers have several different techniques for diagnosing an illness. These may include a discussion of one's symptoms, personal and family history, observation of non-verbal cues like posture or tone of voice, and medical divination. More important than the particular technique is the healer's intuition, sensitivity, and spiritual power.

There is no typical Native American healing session. Methods of healing include prayer, chanting, music, smudging (burning sage or aromatic woods), herbs, laying-on of hands, massage, counseling, imagery, fasting, harmonizing with nature, dreaming, sweat lodges, taking hallucinogens (e.g., peyote), developing inner silence, going on a shamanic journey, and ceremony. Family and community are also important in many healing sessions. Sometimes healing happens quickly. Sometimes a long period of time is needed for healing. The intensity of the therapy is considered to be more important than the length of time required. Even if the healing happens quickly, however, a change in life style is usually required in order to make the healing last.

A medicine bundle may also be used in Native American healing. The medicine bundle is a bag made of leather or an animal pelt in which the healer carries an assortment of ritual objects, charms, herbs, stones, and other healing paraphernalia. The bundle is a concrete token of the medicine power that the spirits have given the healer, either for healing in general or for healing a particular illness. The bundles vary according to clan, tribe, and individual.

Credits: 

Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine by  Linda Chrisman