Author Topic: Horses?  (Read 2771 times)

svisioner

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Horses?
« on: August 30, 2010, 09:02:04 AM »

  Looking for resources on how to keep and care for a horse.

   We just got three horses and know very little about them, anyone
know of a good book or on line resource?

  Thanks in Advance

  Peace and Love

  Dan
  Visit www.placeofrefuge2012.com


Yowbarb

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Horses
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2011, 12:34:22 AM »
Acreage Equines Horse Care

http://www.acreageequines.com/horsecare/


Yowbarb

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Re: Horses
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011, 01:40:08 AM »

chaunska

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2011, 09:39:55 PM »
First off, DO NOT feed grass clippings from the yard, lots of apples, lots of sweet feed, lots of carrots etc.    Horses need pasture grass (if they are used to it) or prairie hay, ONLY.    I have seen many new horse owners try and feed treats and all kinds of goodies....a very bad thing to do.   You will founder you horse if you do this.   Colic is also a possibility.    Both issues cause lots of pain and death in a lot of cases.   

Second, never let a overheated, just worked horse drink water.   Cool them down first by walking them until their breast is cool to the touch.   This can also kill a horse.   

Third,  just stay away from alfalfa hay....It use to be thought of as great for horses, but is causing lots of problems.   Also, you never know if you are going to get a true first cutting or not.   If it isn't a first cutting, there's a good chance that the hay contains dead crimped blister beetles.   One beetle ingested will kill a horse dead.

Forth,   Never let a horse near cherry trees.   Any wilted leaves are deadly to horses.
Peach and plum tree leaves are also somewhat toxic.

Get a "poisonous plants to horses" book. 

Horses require a lot of care and knowledge for them to be safe and healthy.....Please read a lot of books right away and get with a friend or someone who you can use as a reference. 

These are just some of the important things....there are many more you will need to learn about.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2011, 09:43:29 PM by chaunska »

Yowbarb

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2011, 04:09:02 AM »
chaunska, it's good to have this information and thanks for sharing.
 :)
Yowbarb

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2012, 04:14:22 AM »

Yowbarb

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2013, 04:41:40 AM »
Also posted in the Topic, Kudzu,
in the Board, Medicinal Herbs and Foods - 2012 and Beyond
- Yowbarb
...
http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/horse-forums/    horse forums

http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/horse-forums/did-you-know-kudzu-is-safe-horses-145227.html

Discuss Did you know Kudzu is safe for horses? at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.
 According to the North Carolina State University Equine Vetrinary College, kudzu is a safe forage/roughage ...

Limited availability of traditional horse hays may necessitate feeding non-traditional forage sources. Horses can effectively graze kudzu, which is similar in protein and energy to immature graze hay. Overgrazing and destruction of the kudzu is encouraged. Other alternative forage sources that can be fed if properly harvested at an immature stage are:

DE(mcal/lb) CP% Ca% P%Oat Hay .79 8.6 .29 .23Wheat Hay .76 7.7 .13 .18Soybean Hay .79 9.9 1.12 .14Peanut Hay .85 14 1.10 .20
 Access the fact sheet entitled "Selecting Feedstuffs for Horses" on this web site. Obtain a feed analysis before feeding alternative hays. When the nutrient content and feed quality is confirmed, alternative forage sources can be substituted pound-for-pound with traditional hay sources.
 
...I don't know about everyone else but kudzu completely overruns parts of the South. I am seriously considering bringing some home and exposing my horses to it. IT grows faster than grass, is more nutritous than most of the grass types in my pasture, and could save me thousands in hay bills.
 
Anyone else heard of or tried this?
 
(source: NCSU: Animal Science - Extension Horse Husbandry, Horse Fact Sheets)

"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of Solitaire. It is a grand passion." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

http://www.ashelynmorgans.com

Survival101

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2013, 06:01:23 AM »

"...I don't know about everyone else but kudzu completely overruns parts of the South. I am seriously considering bringing some home and exposing my horses to it. IT grows faster than grass, is more nutritous than most of the grass types in my pasture, and could save me thousands in hay bills."

Please, check out the thread Kudzu as to why this would not be a good idea to do, it's even stated here in the first sentence..."kudzu completely overruns parts of the South." There are no adequate natural predators to control this plant. It could take over everything and cover everything. It's a scary sight to see trees, buildings, utility poles and lines, anything in it's way just covered with Kudzu...

Yowbarb

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Re: Horses?
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2013, 06:57:18 AM »

"...I don't know about everyone else but kudzu completely overruns parts of the South. I am seriously considering bringing some home and exposing my horses to it. IT grows faster than grass, is more nutritous than most of the grass types in my pasture, and could save me thousands in hay bills."

Please, check out the thread Kudzu as to why this would not be a good idea to do, it's even stated here in the first sentence..."kudzu completely overruns parts of the South." There are no adequate natural predators to control this plant. It could take over everything and cover everything. It's a scary sight to see trees, buildings, utility poles and lines, anything in it's way just covered with Kudzu...

Hello Survival101.  :)
I think the point of the post (in the horse forum) is the person was thinking of gathering some kudzu in his area. I do not think he meant he was going to plant it and grow it. Already noted it is an invasive species.
My point in posting is: If a person is in an area overrrun with kudzu, instead of freaking out - make use of it. Let the domestic animals have it. Make tea and medicine and use it for vegetables for humans.
Especially in catastrophic times, "Aftertime," etc. 
Well more later going to see what other domestic animals and critters can eat it and what uses etc. and will post it in the Kudzu Topic mainly. (So far, horses and goats can eat it.)
All The Best,
Yowbarb