Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 ... 10
1
Australia, New Zealand region / Re: anyone down south
« Last post by rotorman on Today at 01:16:32 AM »
Well time passes ,still no planet ,mind u if it was anywhere near us I would suggest the moon ripped to pieces and earth gone ,nothing to report here in Aussie land ....nothing !! Yes I do look up but nothing ?Steve Olsen still going on about lens flares ,that could go on for years and with his Jesus sh*t ,bloody hell getting fed up with it all ,to Olsen it's real and sucks people in ,I guess it's religion beliefs that so many believe but not here in Australia ,we don't subscribe to that bs ,no Jesus in our neck of the woods ,
2
Survival Shelter and Location Ideas / Re: Maps
« Last post by R.R. Book on November 19, 2017, 05:14:53 PM »
The fault itself could only be considered visible in that there is an obvious steep decline from the Honey Brook Massif, which is the geological name for the Baron's Hills.  A massif is a mountain that stands on its own, apart from another system, and moves alone as an unbreakable unit during seismic activity.  The fault lies at the bottom of the massif on the northwest corner where it adjoins the eastern Appalachians via a valley of Amish folk.  For their sake, I hope that the fault remains stable - the stability of abutting bedrock to the north of the massif could help to hold the area together.  Oddly, the only geographer to note that fault was a Frenchman who wrote about it in French, and thanks to the Internet it has been translated.  None of the state college geographers have ever mentioned it.

Floodwaters would be expected to accumulate below us to the south and east, where the Piedmont Upland eventually becomes coastal plain and tidal bore up larger rivers may occur.  Interestingly, rivers on all sides of the massif terminate in every direction near us as springs, so we have the benefit of lots of water but all running downhill away from here.

Is a centered deep fault more stable?
3
Surviving in Place / Re: Urban Survival Skills
« Last post by R.R. Book on November 19, 2017, 04:53:21 PM »
We have learned to keep new chickens at home for a month before allowing them to join the others foraging at the edge of the woods.  Once we had a young hen leave home for three months and then return - we had allowed her to forage right away and she was confused about where home was still, plus hens need to be kept together for the first few days when a newcomer arrives, because the pecking order has to be re-established each time the flock changes, and there is no way of circumventing that ritual. :)
4
Surviving in Place / Re: Urban Survival Skills
« Last post by Yowbarb on November 19, 2017, 04:19:52 PM »
Good to know about chicken poop and its decontaminating qualities.  There are some (not many) who are said to feed their chickens from the wild, as they gather hickory nuts, walnuts, etc.  Re the nuts, all you have to do is crack them open, and let the birds do the rest.  If you find a breed that is known to be a good forager, you'll have better luck than if you look for one of those birds who are known for their large size.

I remember Harvey Ussery mentioned this in his book BackYard Poultry or similar name.  He doesn't give instructions on how to do so, but knows there are some who do, and of course they say the birds are leaner, but they do lay eggs and do provide meat, but in smaller quantities than the bigger birds.

It makes a lot of sense to at least try.  One woman who posted about this on the WAPFarmers yahoo email list said that when she gets a new chicken, she just puts it in with the others who have to free-range and she said they learn that they have to get their own food, and do.  Sometimes she has them at the edge of some woods where there's cover, plus more variety of foods, but cannot recall about predator control.  Could be a dog, or llama, or ??

Sounds like a really good reference... yes for sure people should be thinking about bringing chickens along on their bug out...
5
Reporting Your Observation / Re: Evidence of Earth Axis Shift
« Last post by ilinda on November 19, 2017, 04:18:30 PM »
Hard to believe we're barely a month away from winter solstice!  In the meantime, we still have a lot of data to gather, so hang on to your seats.

Recent observations:
October 16, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 6.25" right on AOB (add-on board).
October 18, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 5.75" right on AOB.
October 23, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 6.25" right on AOB.
October 25, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 5.0" right on AOB.
October 26, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 5.25" right on AOB.

New observations:
October 31, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 8.875" right on AOB.
November 3, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 7.5" right on AOB.
November 8, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 5.5" right on AOB.
November 11, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 6.125" right on AOB.
November 16, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 4.0" right on AOB.
November 19, 2017, noon CST, north-south line pointed 3.0" right on AOB.

There we have it for now, and it does appear that the north-south line is slowly on the move in a westerly direction as it does at this time of year, which is more easily envisioned when viewing an analemma. 

But rather than preparing an analemma for this year, I plan to concentrate on the creation of successive graphs showing the changing length of Sol's noon shadow, comparatively for 2015 and 2016 and 2017.   Studying these graphs gives the observer a better picture of any new trends or patterns that may appear.  Stay tuned.
6
Surviving in Place / Re: Urban Survival Skills
« Last post by ilinda on November 19, 2017, 04:01:40 PM »
Good to know about chicken poop and its decontaminating qualities.  There are some (not many) who are said to feed their chickens from the wild, as they gather hickory nuts, walnuts, etc.  Re the nuts, all you have to do is crack them open, and let the birds do the rest.  If you find a breed that is known to be a good forager, you'll have better luck than if you look for one of those birds who are known for their large size.

I remember Harvey Ussery mentioned this in his book BackYard Poultry or similar name.  He doesn't give instructions on how to do so, but knows there are some who do, and of course they say the birds are leaner, but they do lay eggs and do provide meat, but in smaller quantities than the bigger birds.

It makes a lot of sense to at least try.  One woman who posted about this on the WAPFarmers yahoo email list said that when she gets a new chicken, she just puts it in with the others who have to free-range and she said they learn that they have to get their own food, and do.  Sometimes she has them at the edge of some woods where there's cover, plus more variety of foods, but cannot recall about predator control.  Could be a dog, or llama, or ??
7
Survival Shelter and Location Ideas / Re: Maps
« Last post by ilinda on November 19, 2017, 03:54:32 PM »
Absolutely - when we speak of geological record, the Pleistocene may be the most recent era that would be relevant (2.6 mil to 11,700 years ago).  For example, in my own research, I learned one important fact: the foothills in our area were not part of the original Appalachian range, but rather slammed into it after breaking away from another land mass.  Though the topography appears seamless from the ground, there is actually an inactive faultline where the collision occurred.  That is the record of east-west motion.  The record of north-south motion adds that we are at the southern tip of stable New England bedrock which also may be separate from the Appalachians - good to know these things  :)
Do you think/know your faultline is a deep one?    The "Black Fault" which underlies our farm and parallels the creek that parallels our road, is known as being centered deep, rather than a surface fault such as San Andreas, which is visible from air.
8
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/SJUTWOSP+shtml/192308_SJUTWOSP.shtml

Perspectivas De Las Condiciones Del Tiempo En El Tropico

000
ACCA62 TJSJ 192308
TWOSPN

Perspectiva Especial sobre las Condiciones del Tiempo Tropical
Emitido por el Centro Nacional de Huracanes Miami, FL
Traducido por el Servicio Nacional de Meteorologia San Juan PR
700 PM EST domingo 19 de noviembre de 2017   

Para el Atlantico Norte...Mar Caribe y Golfo de Mexico:

No se espera formacion de ciclon tropical durante los proximos 5
dias.

$$

Pronosticador Beven
9
PERMACULTURE / Re: post-cataclysmic soil
« Last post by Yowbarb on November 19, 2017, 03:05:08 PM »
The Earth Around Us: Maintaining A Livable Planet

screen shot of excerpt, when searching for chicken poop as decontaminant
10
PERMACULTURE / Re: post-cataclysmic soil
« Last post by Yowbarb on November 19, 2017, 03:04:48 PM »
Socrates, great posts...
Pages: [1] 2 ... 10