Author Topic: Miso as a protector against radiation  (Read 4683 times)

Yowbarb

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Miso as a protector against radiation
« on: March 17, 2011, 11:03:55 AM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/meg-wolff/radiation-misos-hopeful-h_b_836744.html

Meg Wolff   two-time cancer survivor, healthy food expert/promoter

Posted: March 17, 2011 10:51 AM   Radiation and Miso's Hopeful Healing Powers


Read More:Dr. Judah Folkman , Dr. Tatsuichiro Akizuki , Japan , Japan Earthquake , Japan Radiation , Japanese Nuclear Crisis , Miso , Miso Soup , Radiation , Sanae Suzuki , Health News

My husband, who has a job that takes him around the world, has quite a few friends and colleagues in Japan, and he's been worried about their safety and health because of the recent earthquakes, tsunami and nuclear power plant dangers.

Through our talks about everything going on there, I've been reminded a lot about something I learned several years ago while writing the story of my recovery from breast cancer.

I've been remembering the astounding findings about the ability of miso to offset the impact of radiation exposure. I am so hoping, as everyone is, that experts are right and everything will be contained as much as possible. And I think it's worth sharing this incredible information.

Miso -- a soybean paste that has been fermented in salt anywhere from two months to three years -- has been considered a powerful substance for centuries in Japan. Perhaps the most compelling example of this in recent history is from Tatsuichiro Akizuki, M.D., who used miso to treat the sick and wounded who had survived the dropping of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. Akizuki recorded his experience after the war:
 
On August 9, 1945, the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. It killed many thousands of people. The hospital I was in charge of at the time was located only one mile from the center of the blast. It was destroyed completely. My assistants and I helped many victims who suffered from the effects of the bomb. In my hospital there was a large stock of miso and tamari (the liquid that comes off the miso during the fermentation process and also used a condiment and soup stock). We also kept plenty of brown rice and wakame (a sea vegetable). So I fed my co-workers brown rice and miso soup. I remember that none of them suffered from the atomic radiation. I believe this is because they had been eating miso soup.

 (Dr. Akizuki wrote about this further in How We Survived Nagasaki (London: Quartet Books, 1981), and more information about his studies and others about the powers of miso can be found at the Kushi Institute of Europe website. For more information about miso's benefits, visit this site by Delia Quigley, a health and nutrition author.)

I was exposed to a lot of radiation during my treatments for bone and then breast cancer. So I took stock in anything that I trusted would help counteract those treatments, including miso soup. The Japanese like to say that miso "strengthens the weak and softens the hard," meaning that it restores vitality to tired and sick organs, while softening and dissolving stagnation, cysts and tumors.

Miso contains a phytochemical called genistein that scientists have discovered performs the almost miraculous feat of cutting off blood flow to cancerous tumors, thus suffocating them. This incredible process, called anti-angiogenesis, is thought by many cancer experts, including the late Dr. Judah Folkman of Harvard Medical School, to be an ideal form of cancer therapy -- one that attacks the cancer cells but leaves normal cells unaffected. 
Miso is rich in friendly bacteria, which aids digestion, and it's a source of protein, too.

My friend Sanae Suzuki, a fellow cancer survivor, who is from Japan, wrote a great post recently about "Essential Foods to Help Protect Against Radiation." Sanae reinforces the idea of eating miso soup and offers other advice to people in need of protection against radiation.

Here is my tried-and-true recipe for Miso Soup, which can be found in my new cookbook, A Life In Balance: Delicious, Plant-based Recipes for Optimal Health.

BASIC MISO SOUP
 ½ to 1 inch piece wakame sea vegetable (available at most health-food stores) per cup of soup
 2 ½ cups of spring water
 ½ to 1 cup finely sliced vegetable (such as carrot, daikon radish, onion, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, leek or shiitake mushroom. Use one or more vegetables.)
 ¾-1 teaspoon of miso paste per cup of soup (2 for this recipe)
 1 teaspoon finely chopped scallion garnish per cup of soup

Place the wakame in a small cup of water to soak until tender (5 minutes). Finely slice the wakame and place it in a saucepan with fresh spring water or filtered tap water. Bring to a boil, uncovered, over medium heat.

When the water is boiling, add the vegetables. Simmer all until tender, about three to five minutes. In a mug or small bowl, add the miso paste in a small amount of water and stir until blended. Pour the diluted miso into the lightly simmering broth and cook for five more minutes. Serve garnished with chopped scallion. Serves two.

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« Last Edit: March 17, 2011, 11:07:32 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 05:14:40 AM »
http://kitchenwizardmari.com/2009/09/10/the-worlds-easiest-fastest-home-made-miso-soup/

The World’s Easiest, Fastest, Home-Made Miso-Soup!

September 10, 2009

Do you like miso soup?

Miso Soup is considered Japan’s national dish (OK, next to sushi), many have asked me how to make one.

As a native Japanese, I love miso-soup, as much as you do, but I never made it too often. (Japanese housewives, whether they are working or not, they are expected to make at least 一汁二菜 (ichiju nisai, meaning 1 soup (most often miso soup), and 2 dishes, plus rice. I’m only forgiven because I live in the US, and am married to an American…)

Why?  Because I thought it was a pain to make it every time from scratch.

To save that hassle and satisfy my appetite for miso-soup (I like it especially in the morning with my bowl of hot rice), I’ve even bought one of these freeze-dried miso-soup from Japanese markets.  Although they are pretty decent and not as expensive as $3-5 cup of miso soup from Japanese restaurants, they end up quite expensive.

As I started Kitchen Wizard, one of the things I experimented with was batching miso-soup.

It turned out to be a brilliant idea!

So, let me share with you the world’s easiest, fastest, home-made miso-soup recipe.
The World’s Easiest, Fastest, Home-Made Miso-Soup
Ingredients:
(4-5 servings – multiply by the number of serving you want to make)

    Miso with dashi: 1/4 c (1 TBS per serving)
    Chopped green onions: 1 stalk (about 1/4 stalk per serving)
    Dried wakame about 3-4 TBS (about 1/2 -1 TBS per serving)
    Abura-age (fried tofu) cut in half, then into strips: 1 sheet (1/4 – 1/5 per serving)
    Lightly cooked/microwaved vegetables, cut in bite-size pieces: about 1/4 C (1 oz per serving), such as cabbage, onion

Directions:

    Mix well miso and other ingredients that are cut in bite-size pieces.  Make sure to add abura-age, especially if you plan to freeze this. Do not use things like tofu, potato, etc. that doesn’t freeze well. If you are planning to eat them quickly and not freeze, you can use anything including tofu.
    Divide into the number of servings and wrap each with plastic wrap. Keep in the refrigerator or freezer (Miso will not completely freeze.)
    When ready to eat, unwrap and pour boiling water.
    Optionally, you can garnish with chopped green onion on top.

Note:

You can make a large batch of softened miso, divide and add different vegetables for more variety.

You can also mix a little bit of liquid or powdered dashi into miso if you have any for more flavor. They are available at Japanese or Asian markets.

I know some (not so authentic) Japanese restaurants use chicken or vegetable broth for miso-soup…  so if there’s no dashi in sight, you may try a bit of either one for flavor as substitution.  Use only a little bit, especially if it’s liquid – you don’t want a soggy mess.

With this, you can have a nice bowl of miso-soup anytime you want… With rice for breakfast, just like in Japan, or you can even bring it to work for lunch.

Enjoy!

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2012, 08:27:26 AM »
With the continued question marks about how much radiation we are actually being exposed to, miso is now a part of my diet again. It is one of my staples.
I have made a big pot of soup and had it this week a few times. I mixed miso and tahini to create a paste, added boiling water and lightly cooked it and used it with essene bread, natural rice cakes with seaweed, etc.
When you mix the two ingredients to make a paste it is used as a soup base, gravy or sandwich spread. Can be used as base for sandwiches, etc. Just one of many ideas, below. I have seen recipes also using the miso-tahini paste with grated carrots, thinly sliced black olives, etc.
that mixture might be good with some finely chopped nuts too...
- Yowbarb

1.Equal parts miso and tahini, cucumber rounds, avocado slices, and sprouts

http://eatdrinkbetter.com/2009/04/27/meatless-monday-8-meat-free-sandwich-ideas/

This sandwich is made with firm tofu cubes, tahini and miso, sprouts tomato acocado, dark greens, etc.



.....
« Last Edit: May 03, 2012, 09:27:45 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2012, 08:55:39 AM »
PS I still do not know of a good cheap wholesale or bulk - type source of staples such as the miso, tahini (sesame butter) etc.
I do hope it is possible to really stock up and have these staples as part of the survival storage. In ancient Japan they had big old wooden barrels full of miso made of rice or soybeans or barley, etc. They did not have refrigeration but the miso is fermented. I am not sure where to draw the line on having it unrefrigerated, (I do refrigerate mine.) One thing is certain it would keep better than a bunch of meat in an emergency with no power to keep the food cold. I would say the small, compact containers of miso and tahini could be a real life saver in a sudden bugout situation.
If anyone has more data to share on storage, shelf life, purchasing of these kinds of staples, please post here. I personally feel a variety of food is a good idea if you plan on sharing what you have with some close friends family etc.
- Yowbarb

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enlightenme

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2012, 04:48:04 PM »
I was wondering how you would make miso...So, ofcourse, I was able to find a few youtube videos on how to do so!!  Enjoy!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9tt5zdLJVA&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1meXIbfPp0U&feature=related

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2012, 08:59:04 PM »
I was wondering how you would make miso...So, ofcourse, I was able to find a few youtube videos on how to do so!!  Enjoy!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9tt5zdLJVA&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1meXIbfPp0U&feature=related

I sort of make it by guess and by golly after reading some macrobiotic recipes back in the 1970s.
It can be adjusted to taste. I like my miso rather thick with lots of the miso paste and also the sesame butter. Often I use hearty root veges including potatoes...I think it tastes yummy if I do a vegetable nituke meaning sauteeing the vegetables in good oil or ghi. I use ghi and then add a bit of sesame butter...
I do the hardest veges first dropping them into a pot of water in which the miso paste has aready been simmering for about 10 min. The lighter veges I do last such as chopped onions and garlic...
I like potatoes carrots radishes onions garlic sometimes apples sometimes I drop in trail mix... Yummy.
Thanks for the videos, going to see them.  :)

enlightenme

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2012, 04:15:42 AM »
Thanks Barb!

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2012, 09:28:22 AM »
Thanks Barb!

Potatoes are not "macrobiotic" so I didn't use to put potatoes in the soup. Now I find potatoes seem to agree with me. I have "Irish-i-fied the soup." Well I haven't figured out how to Borscht-i-fy it yet but that would work too. Or maybe some kreplach...yumm? Or not...

Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2017, 10:36:30 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Some basic info on miso

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miso#Nutrition_and_health

Yowbarb Note: Just quickly posting an excerpt below. One takeaway of the article is that it is a huge help to already have the miso as a part of the diet well before the radiation exposure. then it works far, far better.
...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3695331/   Beneficial Biological Effects of Miso with Reference to Radiation Injury, Cancer and Hypertension 

Radiation Protection by Miso
When the 2nd atomic bomb was dropped in Nagasaki on August 9th, 1945, physician Tatuichiro Akizuki, along with 20 employees, was taking care of 70 tuberculosis patients at “Uragami Daiichi Hospital” (St. Francis Hospital) about 1.4 km away from the hypocenter. However, these people including Dr. Akizuki did not have any acute radiation disease. Dr. Akizuki considered that this was the result of consuming cups of wakame miso soup (miso soup with garnish of wakame seaweed) every day4. Later, this was translated into English and became known in the West. In the Chernobyl of nuclear power plant accident on April 26, 1986, in the Ukraine, many Europeans consumed miso soup as a preventive measure for radiation diseases. Therefore, Dr. Akizuki can be considered to be the first person in Japan to point out radioprotective effects of miso for maintaining health.

Based on this case, we commenced our experimental research studies on radioprotective effects of miso against radiation5,6,7,8.

A week before irradiation, five-week-old male B6C3F1 mice were fed a diet of MF commercially available from Oriental Yeast (Tokyo, Japan) and MF with 10% dried red rice miso obtained from the Miso Central Institute (Tokyo, Japan). Six-week-old male mice were irradiated with 7–12 Gy (dose rate 4 Gy/min) without anesthesia. They were autopsied for histological observation of intestinal crypt survival at 3.5 days after irradiation. No protection effect against radiation was seen in 2% NaCl or MF diet groups, but the numbers of surviving crypts (Fig. 1) was significantly increased in the miso diet group (Table 1). However, this phenomenon was not observed when miso was given on 0, 1 or 2 days after irradiation. So it was concluded that a certain concentration of the effective substance(s) must exist in the blood before exposure5.

Socrates

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation, eaten regularly
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2017, 05:37:04 AM »
In 1945 the Japanese surviving the Nagasaki event ate diets very very different from conventional ones today.
Their gut flora and bodies, therefore, were significantly different from those of us suffering from modern diets.

Your survival of tomorrow starts today.
Eat well, i.e. avoid industrial sugars, get as far from electro-magnetic radiation as possible, etc. etc. etc. ...
Then, add things like miso to your diet. It's no great sacrifice; tastes great.
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ilinda

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation, eaten regularly
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2017, 05:23:05 PM »
In 1945 the Japanese surviving the Nagasaki event ate diets very very different from conventional ones today.
Their gut flora and bodies, therefore, were significantly different from those of us suffering from modern diets.

Your survival of tomorrow starts today.
Eat well, i.e. avoid industrial sugars, get as far from electro-magnetic radiation as possible, etc. etc. etc. ...
Then, add things like miso to your diet. It's no great sacrifice; tastes great.
Does anyone here eat miso on a regular basis?  Does it taste very salty?

Socrates

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Re: Miso
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2017, 12:15:44 AM »
Regularly; yeah, very salty [i.e. no need for salt (assuming you're getting good quality miso...].
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ilinda

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2017, 05:32:44 PM »
Based on the miso posts by you, Socrates, and also by others, Yowbarb, IIRC, I did buy a couple of packages of miso--two different types.  Isn't this something you eat in small quantities?

Do you wait until you think there might be some radioactive fallout?  Or just start now?

Socrates

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Re: Miso
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2017, 12:48:32 AM »
It's just good food, Ilinda. Also, it tastes great. It's made with loads of salt so it can be taken instead of salt, i.e. not in great quantities; on the other hand, it's food, not a condiment like mustard or salt [depending on how much mustard you like, perhaps... In this way it may be very similar in how much one adds to rice, for instance].
Obviously, one would be interested in acquiring a good quality miso or even making it yourself.

To be fair and clear, though, in case of radiation poisoning sufficient iodine in the diet is first and foremost, for radioactive iodine carries far, while most radioactive elements only end up near radioactive sites. On the other hand, if one were to consume fish that are contaminated, miso would certainly be key.
Both seaweed [i.e. that contains iodine] and miso are good salt alternatives.

One should consume fermented foods daily just to assist digestion and miso is a good one to add to the diet. Also, it's good to get into the habit of eating such supportive and potentially saving foods, so i'd go with adding it to one's diet, even if only as a safety precaution.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Miso as a protector against radiation
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2017, 11:49:48 AM »
Based on the miso posts by you, Socrates, and also by others, Yowbarb, IIRC, I did buy a couple of packages of miso--two different types.  Isn't this something you eat in small quantities?

Do you wait until you think there might be some radioactive fallout?  Or just start now?

I found an article, posted it a few posts back, about the fact if  people already consume miso regularly it offers far more protection against deadly levels of radioactivity...

Thanks for your post, a reminder I myself need to get back on it... I would say everyone should be eating it.
Will find the article and post a link...