Author Topic: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 3831 times)

noproblemo2

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2011, 06:01:17 AM »

Magnitude   6.8
Date-Time   

    Friday, September 02, 2011 at 10:55:54 UTC
    Friday, September 02, 2011 at 01:55:54 AM at epicenter
    Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location   52.185°N, 171.684°W
Depth   35.5 km (22.1 miles)
Region   FOX ISLANDS, ALEUTIAN ISLANDS, ALASKA
Distances   45 km (27 miles) SW of Amukta Island, Alaska
85 km (52 miles) SW of Yunaska Island, Alaska
1658 km (1030 miles) WSW of Anchorage, Alaska
2410 km (1497 miles) W of WHITEHORSE, Yukon Territory, Canada
Location Uncertainty   horizontal +/- 14 km (8.7 miles); depth +/- 4.4 km (2.7 miles)
Parameters   NST=824, Nph=825, Dmin=172.5 km, Rmss=0.81 sec, Gp= 54°,
M-type=centroid moment magnitude (Mw), Version=9
Source   

    Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
    Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)


Thehumbleman1

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 09:57:35 AM »
Wasn't there a prophecy on this area somewhere, I stopped reading that type of thing a year ago or so.  But with the activity on the Pacific plate so intense this year, this fits with a release area.  Maybe the mountain that rises out of the sea.  I'm still suprised the plate hasn't given way along the Canada/US side yet, seems inevitable to me for quite some time.  Its the only place that is not heavily active, but this post about the undersea movement maybe why.  Thanks for posting, this was a good read for me.

Mike

edit: checked Iris.edu and seen a 7.1 in the Fox Islands, also a 4.1 in Cali and 4.7 in Utah, no coincidence I don't think.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2011, 10:00:08 AM by Thehumbleman1 »

Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2012, 07:45:16 AM »
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/Quakes/quakes_big.php

Region:  OFF THE COAST OF OREGON

Magnitude:  4.4

Date-Time:

Tuesday, March 06, 2012 at 07:13:26 UTC
Monday, March 05, 2012 at 10:13:26 PM at epicenter

Location: 
44.095°N, 129.386°W

Depth:
10.3 km (6.4 miles)

Distances:

424 km (263 miles) WNW of Coos Bay, Oregon
429 km (266 miles) W of Newport, Oregon
473 km (293 miles) WNW of Brookings, Oregon
514 km (319 miles) W of SALEM, Oregon


enlightenme

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2012, 06:32:18 PM »
Recent Youtube video titled Japans Earthquake wakeup call for Pacific Northwest.  http://youtu.be/VD3sOXpkE4U  Interesting, from mainstream news channel as well.

Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2013, 07:25:35 AM »
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_big.html


5.3    OFF THE COAST OF OREGON

Date/Time  2013/01/30 03:14:28

Tuesday, January 29, 2013 at 10:14:28 PM (EST) - Eastern Standard (New York, Toronto)

Latitude:    43.566    Longitude:   -127.598

Depth:       10.2
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Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2013, 08:50:15 AM »
Survival101 posted this in the MSM Topic:

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/chilling-report-10000-could-die-in-major-northwest-u-s-earthquake/   VIDEOS on page

Chilling report: 10,000+ could die in major Northwest U.S. earthquake

Posted on March 16, 2013 by The Extinction Protocolby The Extinction Protocol

March 16, 2013 – PORTLAND - Coastal towns would be inundated. Schools, buildings and bridges would collapse, and economic damage could hit $32 billion. These findings were published in a chilling new report by the Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission, a group of more than 150 volunteer experts. In 2011, the Legislature authorized the study of what would happen if a quake and tsunami such as the one that devastated Japan hit the Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia Subduction Zone, just off the regional coastline, produced a mega-quake in the year 1700. Seismic experts say another monster quake and tsunami are overdue. “This earthquake will hit us again,” Kent Yu, an engineer and chairman of the commission, told lawmakers. “It’s just a matter of how soon.” When it hits, the report says, there will be devastation and death from Northern California to British Columbia. Many Oregon communities will be left without water, power, heat and telephone service. Gasoline supplies will be disrupted. The 2011 Japan quake and tsunami were a wakeup call for the Pacific Northwest. Governments have been taking a closer look at whether the region is prepared for something similar and discovering it is not. Oregon legislators requested the study so they could better inform themselves about what needs to be done to prepare and recover from such a giant natural disaster. The report says that geologically, Oregon and Japan are mirror images. Despite the devastation in Japan, that country was more prepared than Oregon because it had spent billions on technology to reduce the damage, the report says. Jay Wilson, the commission’s vice chairman, visited Japan and said he was profoundly affected as he walked through villages ravaged by the tsunami. “It was just as if these communities were ghost towns, and for the most part there was nothing left,” said Wilson, who works for the Clackamas County emergency management department. Wilson told legislators that there was a similar event 313 years ago in the Pacific Northwest, and “we’re well within the window for it to happen again.” Experts representing a variety of state agencies, industries and organizations expanded on the report’s findings and shared with lawmakers how they have begun planning. Sue Graves, a safety coordinator for the Lincoln County School District, told lawmakers that high school students in her district take semester-long classes that teach CPR and other survival techniques in the wake of a giant earthquake. The class teaches students to “duck, cover and hold” when the ground starts shaking. Maree Wacker, chief executive officer of the American Red Cross of Oregon, said it is important for residents to have their own contingency plans for natural disasters. “Oregonians as individuals are underprepared,”  she said. –KATU

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/chilling-report-10000-could-die-in-major-northwest-u-s-earthquake/     VIDEOS on page
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Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2013, 07:44:25 AM »
Yowbarb Note:
I know it's been a bit random, when something gets posted here as well as in the general Earthquakes Topic. Global Moderator Jim Farmer does most of the posts there.
I feel this is noteworthy. Yesterday there was a 5.5 off the coast of Oregon.
...

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/

Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2014, 02:25:21 PM »
http://www.geosociety.org/news/pr/2014/14-83.htm

kgiles@geosociety.org   Figure 1 from Personius et al.

Seismic Hazard in the Puget Lowland, Washington State, USA


Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2017, 12:31:15 PM »
https://www.pnsn.org/earthquakes/recent   PNSN Recent Events

Pacific Northwest Seismic Network

Yowbarb

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Re: Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2017, 11:25:36 PM »
https://pnsn.org/blog/2017/05/01/volcano-preparedness-may-2017

Volcano Preparedness May 2017

May is Volcano Preparedness Month for Washington State

May is Volcano Preparedness Month in Washington, providing residents an opportunity to become more familiar with volcano hazards in their communities and learn about steps they can take to reduce potential impacts. It is a time to commemorate the May 18, 1980 catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens, which not only caused massive destruction and loss of life but also became a catalyst for a new era of unprecedented scientific discovery, technology development and community awareness. Partnerships for community awareness have created a variety of products and programs that allow Washington residents to learn about how volcanic eruptions can impact their community, to make preparations, and live with greater safety.
International exchange to Enhance Volcano Preparedness Month

Colombian scientists and emergency management officials who are responsible for volcano preparedness at Nevado del Ruiz, one of the 20th century’s most devastating eruptions, will accompany U.S. counterparts during visits to the Mount St. Helens and Mount Rainier areas. The USA and Colombia share similar volcanic risks, and both have ongoing preparedness programs. By sharing knowledge and experience, both countries enhance their understanding of methods used to protect the public from volcanic hazards. In 1985, Nevado del Ruiz, an ice-clad volcano similar to Mount Rainier, erupted and generated lahars that killed more than 23,000 people. The Columbian delegation’s week-long visit to the U.S. will take place during Volcano Preparedness Month this May. It follows an April visit to the Nevado del Ruiz area by 10 U.S. officials and scientists who are responsible for volcano monitoring, notification and preparedness. This binational exchange of scientists, emergency managers and first responders is sponsored by the USGS and the U.S. Agency for International Development Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance.

A public event on volcano hazards will be held Thursday, May 4 at 6 p.m. at Orting High School’s Performing Arts Center, 320 Washington Ave N, Orting, WA 98360. There will be volcano-related exhibits and presentations by Colombian and U.S. officials about volcano preparedness within their respective nations.

Mount St. Helens’ Eruption Anniversary

On Sunday, May 18, 1980, at 8:32 a.m., the bulging north flank of Mount St. Helens slid away in a massive landslide. Seconds later, the uncorked volcano exploded and blasted rocks laterally, destroying centuries of forest growth in a span of several minutes. Nine hours of explosive volcanic activity ensued, altering the landscape, and what we know about volcanoes, forever.

Fifty-seven people died during that eruption, and more than $1 billion in damages occurred. Quieter eruptions during 1980-1986, and again in 2004-2008 built lava domes within the crater. Scientists at the USGS and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network maintain a dense monitoring network on Mount St. Helens and other Cascade volcanoes.

The Washington Military Department’s Emergency Management Division, Washington Department of Natural Resources, the PNSN and the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory are working together to provide timely warnings and reduce the negative impacts of future eruptions. Together, the agencies develop and exercise emergency plans with communities, coordinate communications, conduct public education programs and plan for short- and long-term recovery in the event an eruption or lahar should occur.

Keeping up with volcanoes - local resources

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory website has information about Volcano Preparedness Month events, as well as the USGS volcano-monitoring program and the hazards in the Washington and Oregon. Register for weekly updates and occasional information statements from the USGS Volcano Notification Service. Find information updates about volcanoes and read about science in action at USGS Volcanoes on Facebook.

Washington state’s Emergency Management Division website contains a section about the state’s volcanoes and volcano preparedness measures. Educational materials for children, families and communities are found in the publications section. Follow the agency’s Twitter feed, and Facebook page for breaking news and information.

The Washington Geological Survey (a Division of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources) has developed a new website that covers all aspects of Washington state geology. They also have a volcano-specific webpage that includes maps, geology, and information about evacuation and preparedness to inform landowners, residents, visitors, and emergency personnel about the hazards related to volcanoes. Check out their Geologic Information Portal to find interactive volcanic hazard layers to learn about the hazards where you live, work, and play. WGS has also developed a new series of postcards for each Washington Cascade volcano for this year’s Volcano Preparedness Month. The postcards are based upon posters developed in conjunction with USGS in 2016, and are available at many DNR offices.

Preparing for future eruptions

The USGS–CVO, the PNSN, and the National Science Foundation-funded EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory work to improve eruption forecasting and warning capabilities for Cascade volcanoes as part of the National Volcanic Early Warning System. They continue to monitor Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes in the Cascade Range for signs of unrest. The monitoring network operated by USGS and the PNSN enhances the likelihood of detecting preliminary signs of increasing volcanic activity at any of the Cascade Range volcanoes.

Press Contact Information

Carolyn Driedger, USGS     360-993-8907     driedger@usgs.gov 

Bill Steele, PNSN                 206-685-5880     wsteele@uw.edu