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Author Topic: GARDENING  (Read 20524 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #60 on: November 07, 2017, 10:55:31 PM »
https://www.growveg.com/guides/growing-vegetables-in-clay-soil/  Growing Vegetables in Clay Soil

"Lettuce, chard, snap beans and other crops with shallow roots benefit from clay soil's ability to retain moisture, and broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage."  "Mid and late season sweet corn are a good choice, too, but some of the best vegetables to grow in clay are squash and pumpkins. As long as they are grown in planting holes that have been generously enriched with compost..."


13 February 2015, written by Barbara Pleasant 

Gunky clay is no one's idea of wonderful garden soil. When wet it's heavy and slimy, and it dries into chunky slabs that crack into pieces. Like other extreme types of soil, tight clay can be radically improved with regular infusions of organic matter and thoughtful handling. I have been growing vegetables in clay soil all my life, and we have come to an understanding. I respect clay soil's needs and quirks, and it pays me back with a fun and fruitful garden.

Understanding Clay Soil

The most remarkable thing about clay is its density. Clay particles are tiny, many times smaller than sand grains, so wet clay feels slick rather than grainy between your fingers. When the tiny particles become coated with water, slight pressure can cause them to glue together. If you can easily shape a handful of moist soil into a ball that holds together nicely, you probably have clay. Another test is to mix soil with water in a jar and then look at how the sediment settles. Clay soils will settle into layers of fine sediment that feel like gloppy mud, and the water will take hours to clear.

Because of its fine texture, clay soil tends to pack down, which limits the amount of soil oxygen available to plant roots and soil microorganisms. Here mulches can help, because they act as shock absorbers during heavy rains, and host earthworms, which replenish air to tight soils with their constant tunneling activities. When growing vegetables in clay soil, mulches slow down natural compaction and promote natural soil ventilation, which in turn increases the comfort of plants' roots.

The footsteps of people and pets can compact clay soil, too, so it's important to improve the soil in permanent beds that are never walked upon. There is a catch, in that there is very little you can do in clay soil when it is wet – you must be patient and wait, because attempts to move wet clay always result in a sticky mess.

There are various tests for when clay soil is dry enough to work, and here's mine. Throw a spadeful of soil into the air and catch it with the spade. Gardening activities are on if it shatters, but not if it cracks into big chunks. When I must venture into a dripping garden to harvest veggies for dinner, I walk on broad boards placed in the pathways. The boards distribute my weight so even the pathways get a little protection from extreme compaction.

Good Things About Clay

Because of its density, clay soil does a good job of holding onto both moisture and nutrients. You can take advantage of the nutrient retention talents of clay soil by using slow-release mineral fertilizers such as rock phosphate and gypsum (calcium sulfate) to build soil fertility. Many gardeners think gypsum helps to loosen the tight texture of clay. Gypsum is not a substitute for organic matter, but it certainly works as an easy, sustained source of calcium.

Promoting ventilation is a constant goal when growing vegetables in clay soil, which is easily accomplished by mixing coarse forms of organic matter into the soil between plantings. Chunky types of organic matter like garden compost, weathered sawdust, or chopped leaves will enhance the structure of clay better and longer than very fine materials like ground peat moss or screened compost. When mixed into tight clay, large particles of organic matter become life rafts for microorganisms, which are major players in the transformation from compacted clay to fertile clay loam.

After organic matter has been added to clay soil for more than three seasons, you will see dramatic changes in the soil's texture, or tilth. It will dry faster after heavy rains, crack a little less in dry weather, and won't require as much digging to keep it aerated. Instead, you can start using a long-tined broadfork to restore air to the root zone when renovating planting beds. Clay soil is heavy, so using a broadfork is less work than digging and turning a bed. Once a bed is perforated with deep holes from a broadfork, compost and organic fertilizer spread over the surface can be raked into the holes.

Best Vegetables for Clay Soil

One of the best approaches to growing vegetables in clay soil is to stick with veggies that like clay during the first few seasons of soil improvement. Lettuce, chard, snap beans and other crops with shallow roots benefit from clay soil's ability to retain moisture, and broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage often grow better in clay soil than looser loams because their roots enjoy firm anchorage. Mid and late season sweet corn are a good choice, too, but some of the best vegetables to grow in clay are squash and pumpkins. As long as they are grown in planting holes that have been generously enriched with compost, summer squash and small pumpkins seem to do well no matter where they are grown.

Or perhaps you should try rice. Clay soil is perfect for growing rice because it holds water. The world would quickly starve without it.

By Barbara Pleasant

R.R. Book

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #61 on: November 09, 2017, 06:30:11 PM »
Makes me miss the gardening season~ Alas, we're already getting down to 18 degrees F tomorrow night.  Need to throw some old comforters across nest box lids on the coops and wrap the hives tomorrow.   :)

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #62 on: November 21, 2017, 07:12:28 PM »
Makes me miss the gardening season~ Alas, we're already getting down to 18 degrees F tomorrow night.  Need to throw some old comforters across nest box lids on the coops and wrap the hives tomorrow.   :)

Surprisingly cold, eh? Or is that normal this time of year?

R.R. Book

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #63 on: November 22, 2017, 08:38:24 AM »
Definitely not normal Ilinda, and folks are sitting up and taking notice around here, and questioning what is going on.

Socrates

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Re: cold
« Reply #64 on: November 22, 2017, 10:03:27 AM »
uhhh... Ice age?
I've been expecting the first wave [of 3] of ice age to hit since i first listened to Robert Felix way back in '08. Everything he predicted seems to have come to pass!

In a nutshell: About 20 years ago NOAA updated an estimated few tens of thousands of underwater volcanoes to... [wait for it] 3,000,000!
So what do underwater volcanoes do? Duh; they heat up the (ocean) water.
"So what?", you say...
- increased precipitation
- increased cloud coverage reflecting sunlight from the Earth
- a decrease of air temperature [since precipitation cools it down]


So what are we looking at?
We're looking at a 'long term' disaster, for ironically as the Earth's waters warm up, the Earth's atmosphere cools down. Unfortunately, we are not living under water and what we experience is the cooling down part...
This is normal, i.e. it is actually the norm, for 'interglacials' are actually relatively small parts of cosmic cycles that see Earth usually covered in ice [for many parts].
What is an ice age? It is actually the Earth's most common condition...
Now, for a species that has flourished and matured during an interglacial [a species that has a lifespan of an average mere 80 years], this may all seem incongruent... Nonetheless, this is the reality with which we are all faced.


There are parts of the Earth [i avoid the word "planet" because i don't believe the Earth is actually a planet...] that are enduring more snow and such, while other parts of the Earth experience more precipitation, i.e. where they were previously lacking it.
"WTF?", right?
Well, the whole system must be put into perspective; land masses cool down because the atmosphere above them is cooling down, while the Earth's oceans are heating up (and land masses effected mainly by marine climate are actually also heating up...).
It seems confusing... unless one takes into account that the Earth's climatic changes originate [not ultimately...] with more active underwater volcanic activity.


So while countries that base their climatic systems on land mass, experience more cold, coastal regions actually experience the opposite: less cold (though similarly more precipiation).
This has always been the world of climate in a sense, i.e. coastal regions have always had their climates determined by oceanic influences; only now, these influence have become more prominent.
Again, it's about location location location...

The oceans are heating up; this is in line with all planets in our solar system, which are all heating up. The source? Probably the Planet X system...
Are ice age cycles therefore aligned with Planet X? Probably.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 05:29:34 PM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #65 on: November 23, 2017, 06:08:26 AM »
Quote
i don't believe the Earth is actually a planet

Would you elaborate?

Socrates

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #66 on: November 23, 2017, 09:40:44 AM »
According to Zecharia Sitchin there was a big planet called Tiamat; one of Nibiru's [/Nemesis'] moons struck it and most of it is now the Asteroid Belt, but a bigger piece remained and this is Earth.
I'm not saying that's the case, but that's one version of Earth's history.

Also, when one dives into Flat Earth Theory and listens to what flatearthers have to say about it, they make a number of really good and convincing points; to name a few:
- try arguing that the Earth is spherical in shape without using the word "NASA"
- NASA is a military, monopolistic, governmental agency; each adjective there evokes deception and secrecy
- why are there no 360 degree shots of Earth from space?
- NASA herself will tell you that images of Earth are pasted together
The list goes on and on.

In the end i not only no longer assume that Earth is a planet, but i actually find it far more plausible that it is a planetoid, i.e. part of what once was a planet.
I just don't know what to think about it anymore, but i sure as hell stopped believing the mainstream idea with all the holes it has in it.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 05:24:38 PM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #67 on: November 23, 2017, 05:54:44 PM »
According to Zecharia Sitchin there was a big planet called Tiamat; one of Nibiru's [/Nemesis'] moons struck it and most of it is now the Asteroid Belt, but a bigger piece remained and this is Earth.
I'm not saying that's the case, but that's one version of Earth's history.

Also, when one dives into Flat Earth Theory and listens to what flatearthers have to say about it, they make a number of really good and convincing points; to name a few:
- try arguing that the Earth is spherical in shape without using the word "NASA"
- NASA is a military, monopolistic, governmental agency; each adjective there evokes deception and secrecy
- why are there no 360 degree shots of Earth from space?
- NASA herself will tell you that images of Earth are pasted together
The list goes on and on.

In the end i not only no longer assume that Earth is a planet, but i actually find it far more plausible that it is a planetoid, i.e. part of what once was a planet.
I just don't know what to think about it anymore, but i sure as hell stopped believing the mainstream idea with all the holes it has in it.
But if the Earth is flat, wouldn't it have a narrow edge and two very large flat "sides", sort of like a giant flat rock?  If so, wouldn't there be somewhere on the earth where the edges would be noticed? 

Plus, if it's flat, deep drilling for oil or minerals or whatever, or especially the deep core drills, would result in the drill "bit" emerging on the other side of the flat disk, right out of the panet, and into the atmosphere!

Plus, wouldn't at least some of the satellite photos show a disk in some form or another, rather than something spherical appearing?  The satellites couldn't always catch one of the flat sides, would they?

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #68 on: November 23, 2017, 08:02:19 PM »
flat earth theory is flat earth theory.
I spent many hours listening to flatearthers. All i'm saying is that I do not believe the mainstream narative anymore. Spherical or flat(tish), what does it really matter? I wanted to know the truth about the matter, as much as that was possible and did my own due diligence, but i cannot do it for you.
Both sides of the argument leave one with certain questions unanswered, but in my opinion, if you look around long enough, the flatearthers make a far better case than the one being presented to us all through popular culture and so-called authoritative conditioning [i.e. school system et al]. If you had grown up on Flat Earth Theory and someone presented you with Spherical Earth Theory, i think you'd also have questions, but that the sphericalearthers would have a terrible time convincing you of their case...
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 08:13:53 PM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #69 on: November 24, 2017, 04:59:09 PM »
Spherical or flat(tish), what does it really matter?
It makes a big difference if one is doing calculations based on a sphere vs. a flat object.

Actually I haven't seen the case the flatearthers are making.  They just make the claim.  If they were making their case, wouldn't there be pictures of this flat body we're on?  But anyone can claim anything. 

If the Earth were flat, it would be the most amazing coincidence that every single picture of Earth taken from space shows something rounded, as if spherical.  Plus the satellites that have been launched fly "around" the Earth, but if Earth were flat, would they fly around the "edge" like the edge of a coin?  Or if they flew across one flat surface to the edge, then to the opposite flat surface, it seems at some point there would be pictures of something other than round or spherical looking.

At some point, one of the thousands upon thousands of shots would show a disc or something flat.

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #70 on: November 24, 2017, 08:03:39 PM »
One does not just run into Flat Earth Theory... If one doesn't go out typing "flat earth theory" into Google or YouTube or something, one may never run into it. Doesn't mean there's no case or that spherical earth theory has any validity to it.
You can believe what you like. I'm just sharing. If you've no interest in doing your own research, i don't believe it matters too much. If you think it does, do the research, it's that simple. I procrastinated about it for years, as well (as i did on my research on many topics), but just finally got around to it a few years ago.
Though, if you haven't even heard their case, it seems kinda harsh to condemn flatearthers from a place of complete ignorance about the matter. Me, i found it pretty relevant whether or not Earth is spherical or flattish, so i objectively looked into the matter. I'm just sharing the results of that query, not asking anybody to agree, let alone asking anybody to believe me...
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ilinda

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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #71 on: November 26, 2017, 05:20:51 PM »
One does not just run into Flat Earth Theory... If one doesn't go out typing "flat earth theory" into Google or YouTube or something, one may never run into it. Doesn't mean there's no case or that spherical earth theory has any validity to it.
You can believe what you like. I'm just sharing. If you've no interest in doing your own research, i don't believe it matters too much. If you think it does, do the research, it's that simple. I procrastinated about it for years, as well (as i did on my research on many topics), but just finally got around to it a few years ago.
Though, if you haven't even heard their case, it seems kinda harsh to condemn flatearthers from a place of complete ignorance about the matter. Me, i found it pretty relevant whether or not Earth is spherical or flattish, so i objectively looked into the matter. I'm just sharing the results of that query, not asking anybody to agree, let alone asking anybody to believe me...
Maybe I'm not good at communicating, but I don't believe I condemned you or any flatearthers.  I'm asking questions. 

Sort of like asking questions about Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, then being told to go do my own research proving the general theory all over again.  I'm trying to figure out certain things, for example, where is the data published that supports the Earth being flat? 

I did do a search and found:
The leading flat-earther theory holds that Earth is a disc with the Arctic Circle in the center and Antarctica, a 150-foot-tall wall of ice, around the rim. NASA employees, they say, guard this ice wall to prevent people from climbing over and falling off the disc.

at this link:   https://www.livescience.com/24310-flat-earth-belief.html


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Re: flat earth theory
« Reply #72 on: November 26, 2017, 07:14:19 PM »
I spent many hours listening to flatearthers.
Sorry, but i really did put a lot of time into giving flat earth theory a place and i know that the subject matter is complicated, convoluted and confusing... (and confounding and contentious... ::) ).
It's a common sense topic more than anything else and that means it's more about reading between the lines than it is about 'facts'. Mainly because there are so little actual facts [i.e. incontrovertible hard data] on the matter. Kinda like Hollow Earth Theory [or Planet X for that matter] ya love it or ya hate it and there's really no grey. Therefore i know from experience that there's nothing i can say to satisfy your questions. It ain't that type of topic.

I bother mentioning both hollow and flat earth theory because they are intrinsically related to the matter of Planet X. After all, if planets aren't hollow, then where or how would Anunnaki live on Nibiru, which is a planet without a star? Similarly, if Sitchin [after all, most people's main source of Planet X research, and for good reason] is right about Tiamat and the rest of the history of our solar system, then flat earth theory is also closely connected.
Frankly, i believe NASA has kept the fact that we don't live on a planet from us because that fact alone would have led to many many questions regarding our place in the universe and even the solar system. And since the Sumerians give answers to such questions but TPTB don't want the masses knowing about Planet X, there is a long term conspiracy to keep all this from us. Hence the monopoly over space, no simple pictures, no 360 degree shots, etc. etc. etc. We all now know the first moon landing was staged; i mean, it's not like these people are above doing such things.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 11:52:24 PM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #73 on: December 08, 2017, 02:21:34 AM »
How to Build a Raised Wood Chip Organic Gardening Bed for beginners, Cheap Designs - Part 1  8:40   54,901 views

https://youtu.be/AVaFsORKhl8

Part 1 of 6.  How to Build a 2 FEET TALL Organic Raised Wood Chip Gardening Bed for beginners for $25. Make Easy/cheap designs will Double your roots growth with Air Pruning. Use your own free wood-chips and compost. Best organic raised garden beds for tomatoes and vegetables growing tips gardening design. The WIRE MESH is made of 1/2 inch squares

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #74 on: December 08, 2017, 05:40:56 PM »
Looks really interesting and useful, plus these beds could be moved if necessary, piecemeal of course.  Great idea.

 

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