Planet X Town Hall

Linda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => Survival Recipes of the World => Topic started by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:42:17 PM

Title: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:42:17 PM
Anyone have suggestions for survival recipes?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:43:03 PM
Instant Refried Bean Mix

3 cups of dried beans, any variety (I have used black and pinto)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon dried minced onion
cayenne pepper, to taste

In a coffee grinder, food mill or blender, grind beans until a flour
consistency. Mix all ingredients together until they are well blended. Store in a large airtight container or jar

TO USE:

3/4 C. Instant Refried Bean Mix 2 1/2 cups boiling water

Combine bean mix and water in a medium-sized saucepan. Mix with a wire
whisk until combined. Don't worry about the lumps, they are tasty and add
texture to your beans. Bring to boil, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for
4-5 minutes or until thickened. Mixture will thicken more as it cools.
Refried beans will remain thickened even when reheating.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 12, 2010, 11:49:42 PM
Noproblemo what a neat recipe! I want to try that...

Also, back in April Carlos posted an interesting recipe of a food called tsampa.
[The Feminine Side of 2012 / Re: As a female, what is your main focus?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: 1969quartz0 on August 13, 2010, 06:08:31 AM
Yowbarb and Noproblemo thanks I am going to try both.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 13, 2010, 08:51:25 AM
Here is one for Beef Jerky.
Jerky: A Protein Source
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 13, 2010, 09:36:01 AM
Noproblemo thank you.
This is a great food to learn to prepare. Talk about your survival recipes! - Yowbarb

An image of buffalo jerky ... Plains Indians,
http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg (http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg)

(http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 13, 2010, 09:40:00 AM
Hmm wonder what other flavors one could use for jerky? Teriyaki maybe?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 08:52:56 AM
Vegetable Nituke miso soup   Yowbarb's basic recipe:
Ingredients: vegetables, oil, water, miso and tahini. 
This soup could be made with any vegetable.
...

A tablespoon or two of oil in the bottom of the iron pan.
Let it heat up a little while, not burning the oil...
Drop in the carrots, reduce the heat.  Stir and cook them around for about ten minutes
Put in the diced or sliced onions and garlic and stir. Cook about five minutes.

A second pan has water boiling.
Take about three tablespoons miso and an equal amount tahini and mix them in a bowl with a little water at a time. Make a paste.  This is a soup base.
Stir the cooked vegetables and the soup base into the pot of boiling water. A couple of quarts. Not an exat recipe.
It just needs to simmer about fifteen minutes. The thickness and saltiness and amount of vegetables is up to individual taste.
Toward the end of the cooking time a person could add dark greens, pieces of nori seaweed, etc. if they like.

...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 25, 2010, 09:21:24 AM
Solar Meatballs
1 pound ground chuck

1 egg

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 8-oz. can tomato sauce

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/4 teaspoon granulated garlic

salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients (1/4 cup tomato sauce) so mixture sticks together in walnut-sized balls. (If mixture is too sticky, add bread crumbs, oatmeal or crushed crackers.) Place meatballs in 9-inch dark round roaster or an amber glass dish; pour remaining tomato sauce on top. Cover. Bake in solar oven approximately 1 hour.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 09:45:08 AM
Noproblemo2 I forgot about solar cooking!!
Thanks for reminding.
Sounds like a great recipe.
Found a solar cooking link,
Yowbarb

http://solarcooking.org/plans/ (http://solarcooking.org/plans/)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 25, 2010, 09:48:55 AM
Noproblemo2 I forgot about solar cooking!!
Thanks for reminding.
Sounds like a great recipe.
Found a solar cooking link,
Yowbarb

http://solarcooking.org/plans/ (http://solarcooking.org/plans/)
Here's one for a building a solar still
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooking/cooking.htm#SolarStills (http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooking/cooking.htm#SolarStills)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 12:03:15 PM
I took out most of my running commentary and blab on the soup and so on, here they are, below. The recipe itself without comment is in a couple of posts above,
Yowbarb
...
Vegetable Nituke miso soup

vegetables, oil, water, miso and tahini.  This is Japanese but it is not complicated. I don't have exact translation but nituke means a sauteed vegetable dish.     (Probably.)
'scuse it if I define terms you already know:
Miso is an ancient Japanese food made of soybeans, or rice etc.
Tahini is sesame butter, more on it , below.*
Here is a simple recipe, it could be a budget stretcher possibly in the aftertimes when there are crops. Or any time there is a lot of produce available... Afterthought: You can use dried vegetables, too, of course.
The main ingredients, carrots onions garlic are not so expensive not so hard to grow...
The miso and tahini are dense, nutrient - rich foods that keep a long time, inexpensive too. They are fermented. The Japanese used to (or do?)  keep the miso in big barrels. I am not sure the limits on how long you could keep fermented miso... If you have a big batch of it and it is refrigerated, I feel it would be good to use a long time.
The Zen Buddhist monks had miso and tahini as staples.

At some point MREs could run out and it may not be possible to go kill animals, so the miso could be a life saver. Whether there is fresh produce or not. It would be worth the effort to look at big batches and see how it needs to be stored, etc. how long can it be used when opened, refrigeration etc. Will be looking into it. Note: Linda has posted lots of info on drying vegetables. This would be a very good idea. The dried veges could be kept as a staple to use in the miso soup.

This soup could be made with just about any vegetable a person has.
A person can do this without a recipe.

This would need to be tweaked if a person is making a big batch to feed a lot of people.
Experiment with the proportions and size of the batch. Also, of course, what people will eat.

Sidenote: I plan on getting a tripod and a few big iron pots. Note: One or two pots I would keep only to boil water. One big iron pot I would use for stuff like miso. (If I were to do a big meat pot I would use stainless steel which a can be scoured and washed and dried and rinsed with boiling water.)

Re vegetarian cooking in iron pots and pans: I found in the past, if I used an iron pan, already well seasoned, and used good oil and non - meat ingredients, I could saute a few veggies including dark greens add cooked rice whatever.  I didn't let it get all stuck with stuff. After cookiing I scraped it off rinsed , wiped, oiled it and just used it again... no none got sick. Everyone needs to decide their own kitchen hygiene. I found if it was iron, well  oiled, cool environment, and non meat cooking I didn't have to worry so much about super sanitizing everything. Not selling vegetarianism it has it's simplicity and advantages sometimes.
[If you are preparing food for babies then it has to be sanitary.]
...
Here is what I have done in small batches:
Nice heavy big iron pan.
I take a good cold - pressed oil like sesame, but just about any oil would do that is available (Do not heat olive oil.)
Chop up a batch of vegetables.
The usual vegetables to use are carrots, onions and garlic.
Note: Greens can be added later when these are done. I used to start with carrots because they are heavier and take longer to cook.

Yowbarb's basic recipe:
A tablespoon or two of oil in the bottom of the iron pan.
Let it heat up a little while, not burning...
Drop in the carrots and stir them around for a few minutes
Put in the diced or sliced onions and garlic and stir...

A second pan has water boiling.
Take a blob (three tablespoons or so) miso and an equal amount tahini and mix them in a bowl with a little water at a time. Make a paste.  This is a soup base.
Stir the cooked vegetables and the soup base into the pot of boiling water. It just needs to simmer about fifteen minutes. The thickness and saltiness and amount of vegetables is up to individual taste.
Toward the end of the cooking time a person could add dark greens, pieces of nori seaweed, etc. if they like. Fresh vegetables are preferred of course, but if you are trying to feed a bunch of hungry people then use what you have. As long as you have a supply of miso and tahini any kind of vegetable and a pot, you can put on a meal. It will provide protein, vitamins minerals, and fiber.

It would probably be OK with canned okra or canned mustard greens. I like that sort of food not everyone would, but this is life giving stuff.  You might have to adjust the recipe to what people will eat. If a person had rice to use up, or canned hominy even, just dump it in. It will help fill up the empty stomachs.

Yowbarb sidenote: When my son was little I couldn't get him to have miso soup. It was one of our staples. All the girls would have miso. On miso nights I had to make him a peanut butter sandwich or whatever else he would eat. [Never made my kids go hungry if all else failed there was raw veges with ranch dressing to dip them in, and a natural peanut butter and jam sandwich.]
When he got a little older he used to go to Japanese place in Los Feliz area and plunk down his cash to buy a bowl. It wasn't expensive. 

*sesame butter used as a common protein staple in the Middle East and the Far East. You can find it in glass jars in the international foods section of large supermarkets.  You can also find small cans of it in the Jewish or middle eastern staples there. Also easy to find in health food stores. If I find a cheap large source of it, will post here.
I read an article decades ago that said the people who use sesame protein regularly usually have tough strong bodies...
- Yowbarb

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 12:28:03 PM
We will call this Barb's Beet Tomato Borscht

A soup I concocted decades ago...
I had never heard of borscht at the time.. but this is sort of a borscht soup.
This is enough for 1-2 people

Ingredients:
1-2 fresh raw beets, with the fibrous parts off, chop them in half inch pieces
3 medium carrots
half a large onion
3 cloves garlic
2 tomatoes
1 quart water

Heat up some cold - pressed sesame or corn in an iron frying pan
Sautee the beets first, for about 5 minutes
add the carrots to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes
add the onions and garlic stir and cook without burning, a few minutes.
Stir the sauteed vegetables into the pot of boiling water.
Bring to a boil then turn down the heat.
Add the chopped tomatoes and simmer the pot for about fifteen minutes.
You can season with sea salt, tamari soy sauce or miso... to taste

You may need to cook it down, not exact.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: mjoy on August 28, 2010, 05:09:46 AM
One of the best "weeds" around is Stinging Nettles!  One can make a tea from it, one can make a soup from it, or eat it raw (yes, you can!  :P)  They are all over the place, where I live (Germany), and I like to collect them, especially in the Spring, when they are young. Here is some information about it and my favorite soup recipe, which is the last of the websites below.  ENJOY!:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)
http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html (http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html)
harvest stinging nettles and eating nettles raw! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9ZdKdhKfcw#)
http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html (http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html)
http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm (http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm)
Bye for now,
Mary
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 28, 2010, 07:31:58 AM
Thanks Mjoy, will add this also
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2010, 11:49:47 AM
One of the best "weeds" around is Stinging Nettles!  One can make a tea from it, one can make a soup from it, or eat it raw (yes, you can!  :P)  They are all over the place, where I live (Germany), and I like to collect them, especially in the Spring, when they are young. Here is some information about it and my favorite soup recipe, which is the last of the websites below.  ENJOY!:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)
http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html (http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html)
harvest stinging nettles and eating nettles raw! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9ZdKdhKfcw#)
http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html (http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html)
http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm (http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm)
Bye for now,
Mary

Thank you, Mjoy. I have tried dandelions growing wild where I knew there was no pesticide on them... I think nettles are all around here but will have to check.
Am learning more about nettles.  Important they are young and tender... see below. - Yowbarb
(http://online.wsj.com/media/nettle3_E_20090420175103.jpg)

You Grow Girl site,
http://www.yougrowgirl.com/2007/05/03/foraging-stinging-nettles/ (http://www.yougrowgirl.com/2007/05/03/foraging-stinging-nettles/)
Excerpt:
“This year I’m making more of an effort than usual to keep on top of foraging for early spring plants. There are several that are only edible within a short window of time and I don’t want to miss any of them, as is often the case. This year I got started harvesting stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) earlier than ever, since this is one herb that absolutely MUST be harvested in the early spring while the plants are still young and tender, and BEFORE flowers start to appear. I want to stress the importance of that fact since you can damage your kidneys consuming mature nettle parts.”
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
I went out partially prepared with snips and a collecting bag but forgot my gloves and was stuck slowly and delicately lifting each snipped piece into the bag wielding the sharp clippers like tongs. I suffered a few small “bites” to my hand after growing impatient with the delicate procedure but the early season foliage doesn’t seem to be as nasty as late-season plants because I didn’t need to seek out foliar antidotes (Rubbing the leaves of dock, mullein, jewelweed, or plantain on your skin will neutralize the sting. It is said that the cure is always growing within eyesight and in my experience that has proven to be the case everytime.)
I’m thinking of going out again before the plants mature. I’ve become intrigued by the idea of making up a batch of nettle soup after seeing it done by school kids reliving WW2 times on the BBC show Evacuation.
In the spirit of Be Nice to Nettles Week, we tried our hand at a batch of nettle soup using the site recipe as a basis. Let me tell you that a half pound of nettles is a whole lot more than you’d expect. I harvested enough young nettles (stems included) to fill a small plastic bag however once the stems and not so great parts were removed it came out to just slightly over 1/4 pound. Here’s what that looks like:
Just a reminder to protect your hands with gloves at any point in the process that involves touching any part of the fresh nettles including leaves and stems. The plant will lose its sting once cooked, but can get you at anytime when fresh, even when soaking under water.
The recipe seemed a little too bland so I chopped and added half a small onion before adding the nettles. We did not have sour cream or yoghurt on hand so I garnished mine with bits of smoked trout bought at my local farmer’s market. The soup was really good, tasting very much like vichyssoise. In fact I ate the leftovers cold. The geek in me was very satisfied that a portion of this meal was collected/foraged from the out-of-doors. Over the last year I’ve come back full circle to an early interest in wild foods and edible weeds that I haven’t really indulged since I was a teenager foraging for plants with 'Edible Weeds of Canada' tucked under my arm."
……………………………………………………………………………………….
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses)   Stinging Nettle, medicinal uses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)   Stinging nettle

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 28, 2010, 04:48:33 PM
This is From svisioner
his own homemade tortilla recipe, which he posted on the COSTCO as an emergency supplier topic.
- Yowbarb
...
svisioner: We just got done making a batch on the wood stove (cool here today.)

Whole wheat Tortillas
Ingredients:
* 2 cups all purpose or whole wheat flour
* 1/4 cup vegetable shortening, cut into pieces, we use olive oil 1/4 cup per batch
* 1/2 tsp. salt
* 1/2 tsp. baking powder
* 3/4 cup warm water
You can use some garlic power or onion etc in the batch
Directions:
In a bowl, blend flour, salt, baking powder and shortening until it resembles fine meal.

Add warm water, a little at a time, to flour mixture and toss until liquid is incorporated. Water amountwill vary with different flour types.

Form dough into a ball and kneed on a floured surface until dough is smooth and elastic. Divide, and make 12 smaller balls. Cover and let stand at least 30 minutes.

Cooking Tortilla:
Roll each ball of dough on a floured surface to make 6 or 7 inch sized tortillas. Place on a pre-heated griddle or cast iron skillet and cook till medium golden on both sides.

Remove to a basket lined with a cloth towel or put between a towel until cool. After the tortillas have cooled completely, store them in a plastic bag. This recipe will make approximately 12 flour tortillas.

We make a triple batch, on the wood cook stove you can cook 6 at a time. Failing having a wood cook  stove you can make them on a case iron pan one at a time. Problem doing it that was is you'll eat them as them come off of the stove and never save any for later.



Visit WWW.PlaceofRefuge2012.com (http://WWW.PlaceofRefuge2012.com)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on September 28, 2010, 05:13:02 PM
Note on making tortillas, it is VERY important to let the dough rest at least 30 minutes to an hour prior to shaping.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 13, 2010, 11:58:00 AM
Note on making tortillas, it is VERY important to let the dough rest at least 30 minutes to an hour prior to shaping.

BajaSusan, maybe this is why I didn't have much luck with homemade tortillas years ago. I probably tried to rush it and skipped this step! At the time I lived near Grand Central Market in L.A. and they had all kinds of cool supplies including masa flour.
BTW that should be added to the survival list... ;) you probably already put it on.
Things like masa flour and canned butter, dried beans and seasonings... would help fill up a lot of stomachs...

All The Best,

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 13, 2010, 12:28:53 PM
Do you have the link for canned butter?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 17, 2010, 12:51:50 AM
Do you have the link for canned butter?

I have seen it, have posted a link to a store that had it, will have to look for it. Will have it posted here sometime next little while,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 17, 2010, 01:09:21 AM
BajaSusan,well I don't know the very best deal but I just found this: A place where you can buy cases of clarified butter.
MRE Depot  http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront (http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront)
1 Case of Pure US Canned Ghee / Clarified...$109.95   Twelve 16-oz can

Also,
Red Feather Canned Butter
http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx (http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx)

Price: $195.00
Red Feather Real Canned Butter from
http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx (http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx)
Ballantyne's in New Zealand

If you have been looking to add REAL butter, not powdered or freeze dried, to your long term food storage program, then look no further!

We have found a canned butter that is imported from New Zealand that actually tastes better than any gourmet butter we had ever tried - and with an indefinite shelf life, no refrigeration is necessary!!

GREAT FOR CAMPING! PERFECT FOR THE BOAT OR RV!

Now you can finally have smooth, creamy, high-quality butter . . . and who cares if the electricity goes off??

And the best part (besides the great taste), is the list of ingredients: Pasteurized Cream and Salt - that's it!! No preservatives, food colorings or chemicals of any kind, just naturally made wholesome butter from down under.

Speaking of ingredients; Here's what the label lists for nutritional info compared to the American butter that we are all used to today;
Serving Size: 1 Tbsp (14g)
Servings per container: 24
Calories: 100
Calories from fat: 100

% Daily Value
Total fat: 11g 17%
Saturated fat: 8g 40%
Cholesterol: 30mg 9%
Sodium: 65mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates: 0g 0%
Protein: 0g 0%
Vitamin A: 8%

Each can contains 12 oz of butter - which works out to three traditional sticks of butter. Each case has 24 cans. THIS PRICE IS FOR ONE CASE 
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 17, 2010, 05:42:26 AM
Thanks for the link
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2010, 01:13:17 PM
Thanks for the link

BTW I have heard the following things about ghee - also known as ghi or clarified butter:
(All verbal info)

Ghi cleans out the liver and helps it to function
Ghi nourishes and protects the skin and helps to attract nourishment from the air
I met a woman who had been terminally ill.  (Apparantly not sick any more.)
She told me she bought ghi and began eating it and slathering it on her skin and getting lots of sun and air. She just kicked the ___ out of the cancer.
She didn't go back to the doctors just bought everything at Organicville and went on what she learned via the health grapevine, instincts... I think she did go vegetarian macrobiotic but added lots more ghi than what would be on the diet and also way more raw fruits, etc.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 18, 2010, 01:40:27 PM
Worth a try, found this recipe.

Recipe
Homemade Ghee

Accompanying article: Ghee (Clarified Butter)

Makes about 2 cups

It is critical to use unsalted butter to make ghee; and for the most flavorful result, use cultured butter. Organic Valley and some—but not all—European-Style butters are both cultured and unsalted. This recipe is easily doubled or tripled but requires increased cooking time.

1 pound cultured, unsalted organic butter

Place the butter in a heavy quart saucepan and melt over medium heat, do not cover the pot. When the butter starts foaming, reduce the heat and simmer uncovered and undisturbed for about 15 to 30 minutes, depending upon the heat and weight of the saucepan. As its water content vaporizes, it will foam and you’ll hear tiny, sharp crackling noises. The ghee is ready when it:

• Changes from a cloudy yellow to clear golden color
• Develops a popcorn-like aroma
• Stops foaming and making crackling noises
• Develops a thin, light tan, crust on the nearly motionless surface
• The milk solids at the bottom turn from white to tan

Keep a close watch on the ghee and remove from the heat when done. (If overcooked, it browns and starts foaming.) Let cool until it is just warm.

Pour through a fine sieve or through several layers of cheesecloth into a clean, dry glass storage jar. Discard he strained out solids. When the ghee is completely cool, cover tightly and store in a dry place away from direct sun light. It doesn't require refrigeration. Always use a clean spoon to dip into it.

Variation:  Oven-made Ghee

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Put the butter in a 1½ to 2 quart casserole or oven-proof pot. Place the butter in the oven without a lid and allow it to clarify, undisturbed, for 1 hour. As it boils and foams the water content vaporizes and if you open the oven you'll hear tiny, sharp crackling noises. The ghee is ready as detailed above.

Remove the ghee from the oven. Skim off the crust and, if desired, use it as a flavoring agent.

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2010, 03:09:11 PM
 8)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 23, 2010, 05:35:32 PM
My Grandma Vina used to make "Garbage Soup." out of any leftovers whatsoever in the refrigerator, I think that 's what it was once a week or once every 2 weeks.
As long as it was not actually rotton, it went into a big pot.
(We didn't do the thing where you scrape someone's plate into the soup pot.)

All I can say is every single thing went into the garbage soup.
Back in those days we actually had to empty the fridge once in awhile and defrost it wash it down. Some of the things which would go into garbage soup: A bowl of leftover cooked vegetables. A small container of chopped onions or peppers, frozen. Some extra cooked hamburger meat. A frozen dab of soup or gravy.  I'm thinking maybe some tortillas or stale bread or spaghetti went in, good when cooked down. Not real sure what it was, but different every time, and always good.

I haven't really got into the habit, but I heard that in France they always keep a big pot simmering and they put in leftovers and cook it down to a wonderful soup. Now that the weather is cooling down I might do some soup pots.

I just now googled "Garbage Soup," because I wasn't sure if anyone else made that, and voila!
Here is one page. Serious Eats
...

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2008/08/garbage-soup.html (http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2008/08/garbage-soup.html)  Garbage Soup
Garbage Soup...
Posted by robincat, August 18, 2008 at 9:56 AM

"...and/or other creative, one of a kind, clean-out-the-fridge creations? Have some of your proudest culinary moments come from using up frozen leftovers, like broths from roasted beef or chicken and vegetables that “need to go today?” For me, soup from what I have on hand with a few pantry items added (beans, pasta, etc.) is intuitive cooking at its best and nearly always yields happy results. Unfortunately, the results are those which can never exactly be repeated…."

Yowbarb Note: Some comments there on the page. with recipe ideas, all is approximate, of course.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Linda on October 26, 2010, 03:57:25 PM
Just made a pot of soup today and a great batch of corn bread in the cast iron skillet! Yum

Linda
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 26, 2010, 10:22:43 PM
Just made a pot of soup today and a great batch of corn bread in the cast iron skillet! Yum

Linda

Linda, that does sound wonderful!
Now that the weather is a little cooler, I have been craving soups but so far they are just canned. Now that I am caught up again around here I may be more inspired to make soup. I have a lotta different vegetables...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Linda on October 27, 2010, 05:37:54 AM
I just so happen to have seen a recipe on tv yesterday morning and I had all the ingredients to make it. Wow how often does that happen that you don't have to run to the market to get everything. It turned out great, had butternut squash in it, so it was very fall like. :)

Linda
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:18:26 PM
I just so happen to have seen a recipe on tv yesterday morning and I had all the ingredients to make it. Wow how often does that happen that you don't have to run to the market to get everything. It turned out great, had butternut squash in it, so it was very fall like. :)

Linda

Linda, that sounds good I would really (finally) like to get into the squash and pumpkin soups. These have been staples in Asia for centuries.... I think the English and the early Americans used these things too. Cheap, apparently easy to grow. Also these foods have healing qualities. Not sure what it is yet...Yowbarb
posting a bit about pumpkins and recipes below,

I  have never made this one but it looks fairly easy:

Japanese Soup Recipes
Ingredients:
•1 lb kabocha pumpkin, seeds removed
•1/2 onion, thinly sliced
•1 Tbsp butter
•2 tsp chicken bouillon powder
•2 cups water
•1 2/3 cup milk
•salt and pepper to season
Preparation:
Place kabocha in a plate and heat in microwave for a minute. Cut kabocha into small pieces. Saute onion slices with butter in a medium pan until softened. Add kabocha and saute together. Pour water and add chicken bouillon powder in the pan. Simmer on low heat for about 20 minutes, or until kabocha is softened. Blend the mixture in blender and put it back in the pan. Add milk and bring to a boil, stirring the soup. Stop the heat and season with salt and pepper.
*Makes 4 servings

http://japanesefood.about.com/od/soup/r/kabochasoup.htm

 
(http://blog.hada.org/jeanette/KabochaUncooked.JPG)


"I first had pumpkin soup when I was in London...." from a New Zealand site
http://www.mobydickens.co.nz/images/images_product/0552556734.jpg

(http://www.mobydickens.co.nz/images/images_product/0552556734.jpg)

...
Wednesday, November 10, 2010

New York 'Times
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/p/pumpkins/recipes/index.html
"....By early American accounts, pumpkins (often called pompions in Colonial cookbooks) and corn kept the early European settlers in North America alive over the long hard New England winters. The settlers, taught by American Indians how to cultivate this New World crop, baked the wholesome, thick-skinned pumpkins in the ashes, stewed them, made puddings and pies of the meat and even pickled the rind.

The pumpkin was probably cultivated in prehistoric times by Indians of both North and South America. Not only was it a staple of their diet, but they also used the shells as cooking pots and serving bowls.

Christopher Columbus on his first voyage wrote that in the eastern end of Cuba, he found vast fields planted with calebazzas (pumpkins and squashes). Another Spanish explorer, Cabeza de Vaca, observed pumpkins growing near Tampa Bay in Florida in 1528, and Hernando De Soto called the pumpkins of western Florida ''better and more flavorful than those of Spain,'' though he was probably confusing our pumpkins with gourds (a different species) grown in Europe.

In 1883, in ''Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book,'' there is not a single pumpkin recipe. Under a recipe for squash pie is the note, like an afterthought, ''Pumpkin pies are made in the same way.'' But the pumpkin has long had a much bigger role and greater versatility in other parts of the Americas." [article continues to use of pumpkins in Latin America]
...

http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Pumpkin%20soup%20(american)pumpkin soup (American). Categories
None
Yield
1 Servings
Measure Ingredient
3 tablespoons Butter
1 large Finely chopped onion
1 medium Carrot, finely chopped
1 can Chicken broth
1 cup Water
1 can (1 lb) pumpkin
1 teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Each pepper, cinnamon, ginger
⅛ teaspoon Nutmeg
  Light cream or half and half
Melt 3 T butter and saute 1 large finely chopped onion, 1 medium carrot - finely chopped, till golden, about 8 minutes. Add 1 can chicken broth and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 15 minutes. You can use two cups vegetable broth. Puree in blender and and return to pot. Add 1 lb. can of pumpkin, 1 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp each pepper, cinnamon, ginger and 1/8 tsp nutmeg. Heat while wisking until smooth. Simmer 10 minutes. Slowly stir in light cream or half and half and reheat but do not boil. (The recipe doesn't say how much cream, just use your own judgement).
Posted to EAT-L Digest 02 Apr 97 by Jean Jones <bruja@...> on Apr 3, 1997
...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 09, 2010, 09:26:18 PM
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:27:11 PM
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01510/p_pumpkin-soup_1510934c.jpg

Wed Nov 10 2010, The Telegraph, UK
Recipes

Pumpkin soup recipe
"Pumpkins and squash make a beautifully creamy, light-textured soup."
Pumpkin soup Photo: JOHN LAWRENCEBy Xanthe Clay 6:50AM GMT 28 Oct 2009
Comments
Serves 6

If you’re serving this for a dinner party, tart it up with sage leaves, fried in hot oil until they turn a deep bright green edged with brown. Drain them on kitchen paper (they’ll crisp up) and scatter them over the soup.

1 football-sized pumpkin

2oz/55g butter

1 large onion, sliced

2 sticks of celery, sliced

1 clove of garlic, chopped

1 pint/600ml chicken or vegetable stock


Cut a lid from the top of the pumpkin. Pull out the seeds (keep them for roasting), then with a sturdy metal spoon, scrape out the flesh from the inside, until you are left with a thin shell.
Melt the butter in a large pan and add the onion and celery. Cook gently for 10 minutes or until soft and melting.
Add the garlic and cook for a minute more, then stir in the pumpkin flesh. Cover and cook for 10 minutes, then remove the lid and simmer until all the liquid has cooked away, leaving vegetables sizzling in the butter.
Pour in the stock and liquidise in a blender or using a hand blender. Add enough extra water to make a pouring cream consistency and bring to simmering point.
Taste and season with salt and pepper. Pour into the pumpkin shell and serve with a trickle of single cream and the fried sage leaves.

 


(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01510/p_pumpkin-soup_1510934c.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:29:49 PM
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!

I know they look so good! I hate to think of all the wasted pumpkins over the years... time to cook one, I say!  ;) I did do the type where you serve it in the pumpkin shell really good, a couple times.
And the pies OMG my favorite thing...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on November 22, 2010, 02:59:20 PM
After recipes and videos for fry bread and bannok (all in other topics -- tsk tsk), the next item up the ladder might be sourdough bread.  My dad used to make it in the camp stoves at the sheep camps, and even mom made it sometimes at the ranch.  But I don't know how (tsk tsk).  Can anyone find a reference?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 22, 2010, 03:21:00 PM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHrLZv8Waoo&playnext=1&list=PL91349B834310D4F2&index=54
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI4m_xpQpI8&playnext=1&list=PL91349B834310D4F2&index=25
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POnxAoHl1qc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-wjBgbKf9I
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on November 24, 2010, 07:55:28 AM
Thanks for the links to Sourdough videos, BajaSusan,  Beautiful!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 24, 2010, 08:27:16 AM
Hope they help, Sourdough is my favorite bread of all.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 30, 2010, 10:09:23 AM
http://www.thecampfireonline.com/Bannock.jpg   Image

(http://www.thecampfireonline.com/Bannock.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 30, 2010, 10:36:59 AM
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 30, 2010, 10:54:54 AM
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P

I know, doesn't it look super good? 
Been years since I cooked out in the wilderness with a little fire or stove...
 :)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 30, 2010, 11:27:21 AM
Think I'll try some stove top style for tonight with Blackberry Jam !!!!!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on January 04, 2011, 03:24:35 AM
Survival recipe: Grandma Dorothy's Russian Tea Cakes
These surely have enough calories so you could hibernate for awhile.  8)
I just cranked out a huge batch for some New Years presies. - Yowbarb  8)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: augonit on January 04, 2011, 05:11:47 PM
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on January 04, 2011, 10:33:45 PM
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.

Augonit, I agree that is a good way to think of food. The Eastern cultures such as in India and Japan think of food as medicine...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2011, 10:40:43 AM
All kinds of great tips on foods and food preps from a site in the UK:
http://www.ehow.co.uk/can-vegetables/
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on February 03, 2011, 04:26:09 PM
Thanks Barb good info there
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on June 05, 2011, 06:54:55 AM
Excellent information. I feel prompted to point out that leftovers can be canned instead of freezing - that end times preparation never ends.
Very true, full steam ahead !!! no pun intended.....  ;D
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 15, 2011, 03:04:09 PM
Some cheap, filling - type foods for a group, utilizing canned beans of various sorts.
farther below that a recipe from Lori using spam. (If you don't like spam you needn't comment. We had enough of that in the other Topic on what canned foods to purchase.)  ;D
- Yowbarb
...
A basic three bean salad recipe.  (Multiply this about a dozen times, for a group.) I don't have a good bulk recipe yet.  You can change this up to suit tastes. - YB)
...............
http://100delicious.blogspot.com/
Saturday, July 31, 2010

Three Bean Salad

"My mom has been making this for family picnics ever since I can remember. It's best when left to marinate overnight." - Martha

Three Bean Salad

1 can yellow wax beans
1 can cut green beans
1 can dark red kidney beans
1/2 c. chopped celery
1 T. chopped onion
1/4 c. shredded carrot

Drain beans and place all ingredients into bowl.
Mix the following ingredients together together.

1/2 c. salad oil
1/2 c. vinegar
1/2 c. sugar
1 t. salt
1/4 t. celery seed

Pour over beans. Chill overnight. Stir occasionally.
Posted by Martha

.........................................................................................

Re: What canned goods to purchase?

« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2011, 05:15:44 PM »

Sound good recipe with spam.

       Title: FRENCH FRY SPAM CASSEROLE
  Categories: Main dish
       Yield: 8 servings
 
       1 pk Frozen french fry potatoes,
            -thawed (20 oz)
       2 c  Shredded Cheddar cheese
       2 c  Sour cream
       1 can Condensed cream of chicken
            -soup (10 3/4 oz)
       1 can SPAM Luncheon Meat, cubed
            -(12 oz)
     1/2 c  Chopped red bell pepper
     1/2 c  Chopped green onion
     1/2 c  Finely crushed corn flakes
 
   Heat oven to 350'F. In large bowl, combine potatoes, cheese, sour
   cream, and soup. Stir in SPAM, bell pepper, and green onion. Spoon
   into 13x9″ baking dish. Sprinkle with crushed flakes. Bake 30-40
   minutes or until thoroughly heated.
 
...

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on June 15, 2011, 03:11:56 PM
Green beans are a great way to feel full also.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 15, 2011, 03:50:58 PM
Green beans are a great way to feel full also.


I agree.
Hadn't eaten them much until recently.
A housemate got a bunch of them at COSTCO (part of our shared food budget) so when I made stew, I tried adding them toward the end of cooking time -delicious! Also really good in salads. Sort of a protein-y, filling consistency.
 :)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2011, 11:04:58 AM
Here is a bulk three bean salad. Looks good. Made entirely of canned, jarred long lasting stored ingredients.
Parve, definition after recipe. - YB
...
Easy Three Bean Salad (Parve)

By Giora Shimoni, About.com Guide

"This Three Bean Salad is the perfect parve picnic salad. It is quick and easy to prepare. It travels well. And it is so tasty that even the kids will ask for more."

Ingredients:
•2 cans green beans
•2 cans yellow beans (wax beans)
•1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
•1 can black olives (without pits)
•1/4 cup canola oil
•1/4 cup vinegar
•1/4 cup sugar

Preparation:

1. Drains the cans of beans and olives. In a salad bowl, toss them together.
2. In a separate small bowl, mix oil, vinegar and sugar.
3. Pour dressing over the vegetables and toss gently.
4. Serve cold.

http://kosherfood.about.com/od/koshersaladrecipes/r/3bean.htm
...
This salad is Parve. - Yowbarb

Definition: Parve is a Hebrew term (pareve is the Yiddish term) that describes food without any meat or dairy ingredients.

Jewish dietary laws considers pareve food to be neutral; Pareve food can be eaten with both meat and milk dishes.

 Fish, eggs, fruits and vegetables are parve.

More Kosher Vocabulary Words: Glossary of Kosher Terms

Pronunciation: PAHR-vuh
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 08:44:44 AM
Cowboy trail beans:
 
Pot of water
1/2 cup beans per bowl
Salt to taste
Slab of salt pork or bacon bits to taste

My family has been making this since about 1800. Just put everything in a big bean pot. Fill it 1/2 full of water and then add beans to 1/2 the depth of the water. If you use salt pork; you don't need salt. Cook at a boil for 4 hours, checking to make sure water level does not get too low. It is done when beans are tender. Best served with cornbread.

Mmmmmmm!!!!! Cheap & tasty!!!!
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 10:35:38 AM
You don't need to soak them. No difference whatsoever.

Also, if you want to spice up your food cheap, go to an Indian grocery store ( not American Indian) and spices are about $2 a 14oz bag. Just throw it in some tupperwRe & you are set. The Indian stores have just about everything & you only use about half the normal amount because they are so flavorful!

Bon appetite
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on June 19, 2011, 01:49:41 PM
errrv:

"Cowboy trail beans:
Pot of water
1/2 cup beans per bowl
Salt to taste
Slab of salt pork or bacon bits to taste"

You forgot:  a few leaves of sagebrush.  (My Dad's version)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 06:50:12 PM
Depends on if you are out in the southwest or not. If you are in Oklahoma/Texas/Kansas/Missouri, wild onions & garlic!

Yes sir, beans and salt are just the base... Anything you can add will only improve the mixture. I tinker with all kinds of different ways to fix them, they are a big time staple in our household.

I bought the taco beef TVP & bacon bits to add to my stored beans in case TSHF. Can also make the beans and then add rice for a filler. Depends on how many you are feeding. I'm probably going to start stockpiling wheat & rice soon; for Samaritan stock. I can't see not helping folks during this thing if I have the means now to do something about it.

Semper Fi,
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 23, 2011, 02:41:54 AM
Videos on how to make kimchi etc. (I love kimchi.) There is a Part I and Part II.
- Yowbarb
...

Nuclear Fallout Approaching?! Make Kimchi, Save Daikon Seeds, and Blanch Napa Cabbage Part 1  11:07

Uploaded by anetprophet on Mar 20, 2011

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/i39uUkatLT4

How to make Kimchi, save your Daikon seeds in the garden, and finally, blanch your Napa Cabbage in the garden.

Ingredients for the Kimchi:
3 medium heads of Napa Cabbage
3-4 cups of Daikon - Cut into matchsticks or grated
2-3 cups of Carrot - Cut into matchsticks or grated
4-5 Garlic cloves - peeled and chopped
3-4 tsp chopped Ginger
1/3 cup Paprika
dried chili pepper to taste
1 small Beet and Beet greens

For the Brine:
1/2 cup of Kosher or Pickling Salt per 2 quarts of water

Thank you for watching. Please subscribe to our channel and rate this video.
-Deeply Rooted Organics

Visit us at:
www.deeplyrootedorganics.com

www.soilcube.com
........

Nuclear Fallout Approaching?! Make Kimchi, Save Daikon Seeds, and Blanch Napa Cabbage Part 2   9:44

Uploaded by anetprophet on Mar 20, 2011

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/ndxUQW9ySOE

How to make Kimchi, save your Daikon seeds in the garden, and finally, blanch your Napa Cabbage in the garden.

[Recipe and ingredients]
Visit us at:
www.deeplyrootedorganics.com
www.soilcube.com
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: bk on September 23, 2011, 08:34:46 AM
Barb,
          Here is the link for the bread recipe.

http://www.gettogethergourmets.com/uploads/Artisan_Bread_In_Five_Minutes_a_Day.pdf (http://www.gettogethergourmets.com/uploads/Artisan_Bread_In_Five_Minutes_a_Day.pdf)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 23, 2011, 09:29:05 AM
Barb,
          Here is the link for the bread recipe.

http://www.gettogethergourmets.com/uploads/Artisan_Bread_In_Five_Minutes_a_Day.pdf (http://www.gettogethergourmets.com/uploads/Artisan_Bread_In_Five_Minutes_a_Day.pdf)

Thank You!
Posting your recipe also in our new Topic, Baking Bread

Link:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=3162.0 (http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=3162.0)
- Yowbarb
...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 06:08:06 AM
Next post will have a recipe or two, Yowbarb
...
http://busycooks.about.com/od/nocookrecipes/a/disastermeals.htm

Disaster Meals
Food for Emergency Situations


By Linda Larsen, About.com Guide

Are you prepared for a disaster? From tornadoes in the summer to earthquakes anytime to hurricanes in the fall and blizzards in the winter, Mother Nature can take us by surprise. Take some time and think about your own emergency preparedness and disaster survival preparation.

Usually in emergency situations, the power goes out and your refrigerator, freezer, and oven become useless. If you're lucky enough to have a gas oven, you should still be able to cook, even with an electronic ignition; check your manual and be sure to keep matches available, in a waterproof container. An outdoor grill can be a great appliance to use, but please, do not use it indoors, even in the garage. So what do you do if you have an electric stove or oven and the weather is too bad to grill? Rely on these tips.

Tips for a Disaster

    Canned and dried foods can really come to the rescue in these situations. Purchase low sodium varieties and store them in a cool, dry place, making sure that you mark the purchase date on the product.
    Collect easy recipes that use these foods and store them right by the foods, along with basic utensils like a can opener, bowls, spoons, and plates.
    There are lots of shelf-stable items that are not canned. Look for juice boxes, stock and broth in boxes, dried fruits and snack items, and others that can be stored without refrigeration.
    Rotate your stock of canned and dried foods occasionally to be sure that your supply is fresh.
    Make sure you have the Parmesan cheese in the green can on hand. That cheese is meant to be stored at room temperature, even after the package is opened, so it's great to have on hand in an emergency pantry.
    Many fruits and vegetables will hold their quality at room temperature, so keep some of them on hand always. Apples, bananas, tomatoes, grapes, heads of lettuce, squash, onions, potatoes, celery, peppers, and other produce will store well as long as they are stored in a cool and dark place.
    Water is an important staple, not only for drinking but also for rehydrating dried foods. So keep a good supply of bottled water on hand, for drinking, cooking, and even brushing your teeth.
    At least a gallon of water per day per person in your household is the bare minimum.
    For information about loss of power and food safety, see What About Power Outages?
    For a list of staple pantry foods, see Pantry Staples.
    Before Hurricane Katrina, experts recommended that you keep enough on hand for three days' worth of meals, but I now think that's too little. After seeing the long response times to Hurricane Katrina's victims, I would recommend keeping at least one week of supplies on hand - two is better.
    In addition to food, your well-stocked pantry should include batteries, a radio, pet food if your household includes little critters, lots of bottled water, flashlights or emergency lights, candles, can opener, matches, and any prescription medicines your family needs. I recently found electric candles that run off batteries. They can last up to 24 hours, so are a good source of safe lighting.
    A first aid kit is also necessary; if you have the room, think about storing extra clothes and blankets too.
    Remember to keep your cell phone with you and make sure the batteries are well charged.
    Remember that if you don't have a source for cooling foods, you'll need to make just enough for you to eat within 1-2 hours. A cooler filled with ice is just fine for keeping foods cold, but it won't chill warm or room temperature foods fast enough to prevent safety problems. So either eat all perishable food within the 2 hour time frame, or discard it.
    If the weather is safe enough so you can grill outdoors, make Dinner Packets with heavy duty foil. These one-dish meals can be lifesavers; and cleanup is minimal.
    I'd also recommend stocking paper plates, cups, napkins, and plastic utensils. I ordinarily don't recommend these because they're not environmentally-friendly, but when you are faced with a water shortage, they make your life much easier, and safer too.

So go to the next page to get the recipes, stock your pantry, and stay informed. You'll feel better knowing your family is prepared.    Next post will have a recipe or two, Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 06:18:04 AM
From Busy Cooks site, here are easy to make recipes. These are mainly from canned and packed goods, one has the option of boiling potatoes instead of using canned potatoes. These recipes give more ideas about items to add to a survival pantry. I haven't tried these yet, they look good.
Some of these will be in the following post.
Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator
...

http://busycooks.about.com/od/nocookrecipes/a/disastermeals.htm

Disaster Meals
Food for Emergency Situations


By Linda Larsen, About.com Guide

http://busycooks.about.com/od/nocookrecipes/a/disastermeals.htm

Disaster Meal Recipes

 Bean and Tuna Salad

http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishseafoodsalads/r/beantunasalad.htm
    This salad is delicious, even when it's not an emergency! It's also colorful and very good for you too.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients:

    2 (15 oz.) cans cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
    1 red onion, chopped
    1 yellow summer squash, chopped
    1 red bell pepper, chopped
    1/3 cup olive oil
    3 Tbsp. red wine vinegar
    1/4 tsp. salt
    1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
    dash pepper
    6 oz. can solid white tuna, drained
...
Peanut Butter Granola Wrap Sandwiches
http://busycooks.about.com/od/coldsandwichrecipes/r/pbgranolasandwi.htm

These crunchy and  creamy wrap sandwiches are super easy to make and delicious. 
Peanut Butter Granola Wrap Sandwiches are a delicious twist in peanut butter sandwiches. They freeze well, or can be eaten immediately.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 servings
Ingredients:

    1 cup peanut butter
    1 cup granola cereal
    1/4 cup chopped peanuts
    2 tablespoons honey
    1/2 cup dried cherries
    2 tablespoons butter, softened
    4 (10-inch) whole wheat tortillas

Preparation:
In bowl, combine peanut butter, granola, chopped peanuts, and honey and mix well. Stir in dried cherries.

Spread tortillas with softened butter, then spread with peanut butter mixture. Roll up tortillas and cut in half.

Serve immediately, or wrap well and freeze. Let thaw in insulated lunch boxes, next to frozen gel pack, until lunchtime.
.......................................................................................

Updated Peanut Butter Sandwiches
http://busycooks.about.com/od/coldsandwichrecipes/r/updatepeanutbut.htm   
Carrots, sunflower seeds, and currants add crunch, texture, and nutrition to a simple peanut butter sandwich.
Think about adding other crunchy or chewy foods your child likes to peanut butter for a custom spread recipe.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 sandwiches
Ingredients:

    1/2 cup peanut butter
    1/4 cup shredded baby carrots
    2 Tbsp. sunflower nuts
    3 Tbsp. currants
    2 Tbsp. honey
    8 slices whole wheat bread

Preparation:
In small bowl combine peanut butter, carrot, nuts, currants and honey and blend well. Use to make sandwiches with bread.
...
Butter Bean Salad
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishvegetariansalads/r/butterbeansalad.htm

You could use any canned bean in this excellent recipe; black beans or red beans would be delicious. And add any canned meat for hungry appetites.
You can add canned tuna, chicken, or seafood to this salad for more protein. Use your family's favorite type of canned bean; chickpeas, kidney beans, or black beans would work well.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: Serves 4-6
Ingredients:

    3 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
    5 Tbsp. olive oil
    1/4 tsp. pepper
    3 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
    2 (15 oz.) cans butter beans, rinsed and drained
    11 oz. can shoepeg corn, drained
    14.5 oz. can zesty chili diced tomatoes, drained
    1 small red onion, chopped

Preparation:
In large bowl, combine vinegar, olive oil, salt, pepper, and parsley and mix well with wire whisk. Add remaining ingredients and toss to coat. Cover and chill 2 hours, or serve immediately.
...

Tuna Pizza
http://busycooks.about.com/od/pizzarecipes/r/tunapizza.htm

Mashed white beans, combined with some seasonings, make an excellent pizza sauce for this flavorful pizza. Boboli crusts are another great ingredient that stores well at room temperature.
White beans are mashed up to form the 'sauce' in this easy no cook pizza recipe. Roasted red peppers, tuna, and Parmesan cheese are other toppings.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 4-6 servings
Ingredients:

    1 Boboli® pizza crust
    15 oz. can white beans, rinsed and drained
    2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
    1/2 tsp. dried oregano leaves
    1/2 tsp. dried thyme leaves
    salt and pepper to taste
    6 oz. can solid pack white tuna, drained
    1 (7 oz.) jar roasted red pepper, drained, chopped
    14 oz. can diced tomatoes, well drained
    1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation:
In medium bowl, combine beans, vinegar, oregano, thyme, and salt and pepper to taste. Mash beans, leaving some texture in the mixture. Spread bean mixture over crust. Top with tuna, red peppers, and tomatoes. Sprinkle cheese over all and serve.
...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 07:20:11 AM
Survival pantry recipes continued from previous post. These are from
Busy Cooks  http://busycooks.about.com/od/nocookrecipes/a/disastermeals_2.htm 
Note:
I have posted Five Stars on the recipes which have this rating.
Several of the recipes do not have ratings posted for them, yet.
- Barb T.
...
Coconut Fruit Salad 
http://busycooks.about.com/od/sidefruitsalads/r/cocfruitsalad.htm

Any canned fruit is delicious in this super simple salad. Serve it in ice cream cones for a treat to raise spirits.

Use your favorite types of canned fruit in this simple recipe. If you don't like coconut, sprinkle the fruits with a bit of candied ginger.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 servings
Ingredients:

    15 oz. can mandarin oranges, drained
    8 oz. can pineapple tidbits, drained
    1/2 cup coconut

Preparation:
Drain fruits, reserving some of the juices. In medium bowl, combine fruits and enough juice to keep moist.
...

Kris' Famous Sweet Potato Salad
   Five Stars
http://busycooks.about.com/od/sidevegetablesalads/r/sweetpotatosala.htm

"I love this salad; it's suave and savory. You can also use it as a sandwich spread or dip. Buy small jars of salad dressing or mayonnaise for your emergency pantry for this and other salad recipes. This recipe comes from one of the best friends in the world, Kris W. It's suave, sweet, savory, and a little spicy all at the same time. I've made it with butternut squash too, because my husband likes that better than sweet potatoes. Try it!"
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients:

    2 (15 oz.) cans sweet potatoes, drained if necessary
    2 stalks celery, diced
    4 green onions, sliced
    1 green bell pepper, diced
    5 oz. (half of 10 oz. jar) Durkee's Sandwich Sauce*
    1/4 cup Miracle Whip salad dressing
    Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:
In large bowl, combine all ingredients and mix and mash with potato masher. Serve immediately, or chill in the fridge for an hour or two.

*If you can't find the Durkee's Sandwich Sauce, substitute a mixture of Dijon mustard and salad dressing.
...
Salmon and Potato Salad
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishseafoodsalads/r/salmpotsalad.htm

Use pouches of salmon instead of cans if you'd like; the fish in that packaging does not have skin or bones. Serve this salad in pita breads for an easy lunch.
You can cook 2 pounds of potatoes, peel them and cut them into cubes instead of using the canned potatoes if you'd like.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 4-6 servings
Ingredients:

    2 (14 oz.) cans cooked potatoes, drained
    1 red bell pepper, chopped
    1/2 red onion, minced
    1 (15 oz.) can red sockeye salmon, drained
    1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
    1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley OR 1 Tbsp. dried parsley flakes
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/3 cup finely chopped sweet pickles
    1/4 tsp. hot pepper sauce
    1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper
    1 tsp. dried thyme leaves

Preparation:
In large bowl, combine potatoes, red bell pepper, onion, and salmon. In small bowl, whisk together oil, parsley, vinegar, pickles, hot sauce, salt, pepper, and thyme; pour over potato mixture and toss to coat. Serve immediately or cover and chill 2-4 hours before serving.
...
Couscous Chicken Salad  Five Stars
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishchickensalads/r/couchickensalad.htm

You do need boiling water for this salad, unless you can find a brand of couscous that rehydrates in cold water.

Couscous Chicken Salad
User Rating 5 Star Rating (1 Review) Write a review

By Linda Larsen, About.com Guide
Dried apricots, couscous, and the flavors of the Middle East make this exotic chicken salad recipe so delicious.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 4-6 servings
Ingredients:

    1/4 cup vegetable oil
    1/3 cup orange juice
    1 tsp. cumin
    1 tsp. dried coriander
    1/2 tsp. turmeric
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp. cinnamon
    1/4 tsp. pepper
    1-1/2 cups uncooked couscous
    2/3 cup slivered dried apricots
    1-1/2 cups boiling water
    2 (12 oz.) cans chicken, drained
    11 oz. can mandarin oranges, drained
    1/3 cup slivered almonds, toasted

Preparation:
In small bowl, for salad dressing, combine oil, juice, cumin, coriander, turmeric, salt, cinnamon and pepper and blend well with wire whisk. Set aside.

In large bowl, combine couscous and apricots; add boiling water and cover. Let stand for 5 minutes, then fluff with fork.

Add chicken, oranges, almonds and salad dressing and toss gently to coat. Cover and chill if desired, or serve immediately.
.........................
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2011, 07:45:34 AM
Survival pantry recipes continued from previous post. These are from
Busy Cooks  http://busycooks.about.com/od/nocookrecipes/a/disastermeals_2.htm 
Note:  I am posting Five Stars on the recipes which have this rating.
Several of the recipes do not have ratings posted for them, yet.
- Barb T.[/color 

Pantry Gazpacho 
http://busycooks.about.com/od/coldsouprecipes/r/pantrygazpacho.htm

This flavorful gazpacho is very satisfying. It can be heated if you'd like, and served hot.

This flavorful cold soup recipe is made from easily stored canned and pantry ingredients so it can be made even during a physical emergency.
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Yield: Serves 5
Ingredients:

    14 oz. can diced tomatoes, undrained
    1 red onion, chopped
    11 oz. can corn, drained
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1 Tbsp. olive oil
    1 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
    3 cups vegetable cocktail juice
    6 oz. can tiny shrimp, drained
    1 cup garlic croutons

Preparation:
In a large glass bowl, combine all ingredients except croutons and mix gently. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours to blend flavors or serve immediately. Top with croutons before serving.
...
Texas Caviar  Five Stars
http://busycooks.about.com/od/appetizerrecipe1/r/texascaviar.htm

Serve as a sandwich filling, or as a dip with chips and crackers.
"Did you know it's considered good luck to eat black eyed peas on New Year's Eve? Make this delicious dip for your New Year's Party; or anytime."
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Yield: 6-8 servings
Ingredients:

    1/2 onion, finely chopped
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
    1 bunch green onions, chopped
    2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and minced
    4 cloves garlic, minced
    1 pint grape tomatoes, quartered
    8 oz. bottle zesty Italian salad dressing
    2 (15 oz). cans black eyed peas, drained
    1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped

Preparation:
In large bowl, combine all ingredients except cilantro and stir gently to combine. Serve immediately or store, covered, up to 10 days in refrigerator. When ready to serve, mix in the chopped fresh cilantro and serve as a dip with tortilla chips or toasted baguette slices.
...
Tomato Pesto Bean and Shrimp Salad
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishseafoodsalads/r/beanshrimppesto.htm

Look for dried pesto mixes in the condiment aisle of your supermarket, and make sure they can be rehydrated with room temperature liquid. This salad is surprisingly elegant and nutritious.
This simple recipe is good enough to make even when you don't have to use foods from your emergency pantry!
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: Serves 4-6
Ingredients:

    1/2 cup dried tomato pesto mix
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup tomato juice
    1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    2 tablespoons evaporated milk
    1 (15-ounce) can butter beans
    1 (15-ounce) can Great Northern Beans
    3 (6-ounce) cans medium shrimp, drained
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
    1 red or yellow bell pepper, chopped
    1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, reserving juice

Preparation:
In large bowl, combine pesto mix, olive oil, tomato juice reserved from the drained tomatoes, and Parmesan cheese and mix well. Add evaporated milk and stir; let stand for 5 minutes.

Add remaining ingredients, using any fresh vegetables you may have on hand. Stir to coat, then serve.
...
Brown Bread Sandwiches
http://busycooks.about.com/od/coldsandwichrecipes/r/brownbrsandw.htm

Canned brown bread is a great item for your emergency stash. It can be used in other recipes too; try it with the Sweet Potato Salad as a filling.
You can use almost any sandwich filling for these easy sandwiches. Look for canned brown bread in your supermarket and keep it on hand for emergencies.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Yield: 16 sandwiches
Ingredients:
•   3/4 cup chopped dried fruit or your favorite chopped dried fruits
•   1/4 cup chopped nuts
•   1/3 cup mayonnaise or sour cream
•   1 can prepared brown bread, cut into 1/4" slices
Preparation:
In small bowl, combine all ingredients except brown bread and blend well. Make sandwiches with brown bread slices. Filling can be stored, covered, in refrigerator up to 3 days.
...
Artichoke and Chickpea Salad
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishvegetariansalads/r/artchickpsalad.htm

Did you ever think you could eat gourmet food during a natural disaster? You can with this recipe! Remember, you don't need to use all of the ingredients. As long as you have the main ingredients, use the seasonings you have on hand.

Mango and Bean Salad
http://busycooks.about.com/od/condimentsjamsjellies/r/mangobeansalsa.htm

Canned fruit is something you usually don't think about when stocking for an emergency, but it's a quick source of energy and an important source of nutrients. This recipe is so good I make it throughout the summer.

This salsa recipe can also be served as a salad. It is made out of canned ingredients so you can make it even if your kitchen isn't in working order.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Yield: 4-6 servings
Ingredients:
•   15 oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained
•   11 oz. can corn with peppers, drained
•   15 oz. can mango slices, cubed
•   1/4 cup minced onion
•   1/4 cup oil and vinegar salad dressing
Preparation:
In medium bowl, combine all ingredients and toss to coat. Serve as an appetizer with crackers or tortilla chips, or as a side salad. You could add some canned tuna, salmon, or chicken to turn it into a main dish salad. In that case, store leftovers in the refrigerator or, if your fridge or kitchen is out of order, discard leftovers.
...

Tabbouleh with Chickpeas
http://busycooks.about.com/od/maindishvegetariansalads/r/tabbchickpeas.htm

Make sure you have fine bulgur for this easy recipe, because it will rehydrate in cold water. Any chopped vegetable would be delicious in this easy salad.

If you are shopping for this recipe for a kitchen disaster plan, make sure to read the bulgur directions and buy the product that uses room temperature or cold water to rehydrate.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients:
•   1/2 cup fine bulgur
•   2 Tbsp. dried parsley flakes
•   1 red onion, minced
•   14 oz. can diced tomatoes, drained
•   1 jar roasted red peppers, drained, cut into strips
•   1 tsp. dried mint leaves
•   15 oz. can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
•   3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
•   3 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
•   salt and pepper to taste
Preparation:
Place the bulgur in a small bowl, cover with cold water and let stand for 10 minutes, then drain. Place the bulgur in a clean kitchen towel or a double thickness of cheesecloth or paper towels and squeeze dry.
Transfer bulgur to a bowl and fluff with a fork. Stir in the parsley, onion, tomatoes, red peppers, mint, chickpeas, olive oil, vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and chill, or serve immediately.
...

Cracker Bread Roll-ups
http://busycooks.about.com/od/coldsandwichrecipes/r/crackerbrroll.htm

If you are planning on this recipe for an emergency situation, make sure that you regularly check the cracker bread to ensure it is fresh. You could substitute canned chicken or ham for the tuna.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients:
•   1 (15 inch) round soft cracker bread
•   12-oz. can solid pack white tuna, drained
•   1/4 cup plain yogurt
•   1/2 cup mayonnaise
•   1 jar roasted red peppers, drained and chopped
•   3 Tbsp. capers OR chopped green olives
•   2 Tbsp. mustard
•   1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Preparation:
In small bowl combine tuna, yogurt, mayonnaise, capers or olives, mustard, and Parmesan cheese and mix well. Spread over cracker bread. Roll up bread, enclosing filling. Trim ends, if desired, then cut roll into 1" pieces. Serve immediately.


Cracker bread is another packaged bread perfect for your pantry. Once again, it can be used with the other salads in this list to make more sandwiches.
...
Creamy Mushroom Soup
http://busycooks.about.com/od/hotsouprecipes/r/creamymushroom.htm

This easy soup uses dried and canned ingredients for a hot meal that will warm you up.
Creamy Mushroom Soup uses dried mushrooms, bouillon cubes, evaporated milk, and dried herbs and spices to make a soup during disaster situations. Did you know that you can boil water on your grill? Just put a heavy duty pot filled with water on the grill and bring it to a boil.
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Yield: Serves 3-4
Ingredients:
•   1 ounce dried mushrooms
•   3 cups boiling water, divided
•   1 cube beef bouillon
•   1 tablespoon dried onions
•   2 tablespoons cornstarch
•   1/8 teaspoon pepper
•   1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
•   1 (13-ounce) can evaporated milk
•   1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Preparation:
Place mushrooms in saucepan and cover with 1 cup boiling water. Let stand for 10 minutes, or as long as package directs. Process mushrooms as directed (sometimes you are asked to remove the stems).
Place saucepan on medium heat and stir in remaining water and beef bouillon and dried onions. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 5 minutes.
Add cornstarch, pepper, and thyme and heat until soup thickens. Add milk and heat again until soup almost comes to a simmer. Top with Parmesan cheese and serve.
...

Instant Creamy Cup-Of-Soup.   
http://busycooks.about.com/od/hotsouprecipes/r/creamycupofsoup.htm

This soup can be simply rehydrated with boiling water, but if you aren't in an emergency situation, the flavor is better if the mix and water are microwaved or simmered together. Flavor the mix any way you'd like. This delicious soup can be made just like the popular soup-in-a-cup mixes, but you make your own.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Yield: Makes about 12 cups
Ingredients:
•   1 (1.5-ounce) package four cheese sauce mix
•   2 tablespoons chicken or beef bouillon granules
•   1/2 teaspoon pepper
•   2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves
•   2 (1.5-ounce) packages vegetable flavor broth mix
•   1/4 cup dried parsley flakes
•   2 cups dried milk powder
•   1 cup powdered coffee creamer
•   1 cup dried minced vegetables
Preparation:
Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and mix well. Store in tightly sealed 1/2 pint jars in a dark, cool place.
To use, combine 1/3 cup of the soup mix in a 2-cup mug. Add 1 cup boiling water and stir well. If you have access to a microwave oven, you can combine the soup mix with water, then microwave for 1-2 minutes until boiling, then let stand 1 minute before serving.
...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes - clarified butter
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2011, 07:56:36 AM
This recipe for clarified butter will have to do for now... video.
The narrator mentions seeing the wikipedia article and it has lots of info and recipes too.
Mo lata, here this is:

Clarified Butter Video Recipe         4:32  20,825 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/wXK5CzCvIv0

Uploaded by keithsnow on May 9, 2007
Visit http://www.harvesteating.com to get the written recipe for this video. Chef Keith Snow illustrates how to make and the uses of Clarified Butter in this Harvest Eating Essentials Video.


Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2011, 08:09:14 AM
For the purposes of survival food preparation, clarified butter also known as ghee, sometimes called ghi - is a good food. Why? It is stable and keeps far longer than regular butter.
If a survival community had a couple of milk cows., after awhile there might even be a surplus of the milk.
Clarified butter is one good way to not let it go to waste. It can be heated up, skimmed with a spoon, dropped into a container...then strained through clean cheesecloth into container to cool, then a tight lid needs to go on it. Ceramic containers are good. Canning jars would do. No hot liquids into the glass...
The survival larder could be full of this butter.
It is a delicious food. In India they make it all the time. They make different types with different seasonings. They dip foods into it, fry with it, drizzle it onto vegetables.
I have tried it on warm Essene bread, on vegetables and on cooked whole grains and pots of home cooked vegetables. Really a good food.
I have been told this type of fat is good for the liver. (Along with the monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, seeds nuts etc. ghee is good.)
Previous post had a video.

Here is the wikipedia article on Ghee, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghee
Several recipes and lots of info.
Will post each recipe separately or perhaps just recipes all in one post, to make it easier to print out. That will be next post.
- Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2011, 08:15:17 AM
Basic Indian recipe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghee 

Preparation

Ghee is made by first making butter, and then clarifying it. One begins by boiling cow's milk, then turning off the stove. Once it reaches room temperature, a thick layer of cream is formed on top of the milk.

The cream is removed each day and stored in a container and refrigerated. At the end of the week, the collected cream is brought to room temperature and churned using a wooden churner (kavvam in telugu) or ladle until the butter separates (after approximately 12 to 15 minutes). 3-4 cups of water are added to this and churning continues for a minute or two until the residue is a thick buttermilk. The buttermilk is then strained. The butter (called Maakhan or mukkhan in Hindi and vennapusa in Telugu) is washed in water at least 4-5 times. This thoroughly washed butter can now be used to prepare ghee.

To prepare ghee, the butter is usually melted in a stainless steel vessel over medium high heat. The butter begins to melt, forming a white froth on top. It is then simmered, stirring occasionally and the froth begins to thin slowly and the color of butter changes to a pale yellow shade. Then it is cooked on low heat until it turns a golden color. The residue solids settle at the bottom and the ghee, which is now clear, golden and translucent with a fragrant smell, is ready. The ghee is then filtered, and it will solidify when completely cool. Ghee can be stored for extended periods without refrigeration, provided that it is kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation and remains moisture-free. The texture, color, or taste of ghee depends on the source of the milk from which the butter was made and the extent of boiling and simmering.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 09, 2011, 08:32:38 AM
Not trying to "plug" any particular product. Posting here a few images of commercially available Ghee. In case anyone just wants to try some, who hasn't already.
I have personally bought and tried the first one.
- Barb Townsend
...
from Prepared Planet site:
http://www.preparedplanet.com/PlanetImages/Ghee/gheeLrg.jpg

(http://www.preparedplanet.com/PlanetImages/Ghee/gheeLrg.jpg)

...
From  site: Hub Pages
http://perfumer.hubpages.com/hub/Use-Ghee-NOT-butter-to-Receive-Many-Major-Health-Benefits

"Use Ghee NOT butter to Receive Many Major Health Benefits"
68
By perfumer

(http://s1.hubimg.com/u/758572_f260.jpg)

...
From the kitchn site
http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/good-questions/how-can-i-clarify-butter-make-ghee-at-home-good-questions-142463

(http://i-cdn.apartmenttherapy.com/uimages/kitchen/2009_04_23-Ghee.jpg)

Cooking for the converted site,
Kosher Ghee
http://cookingfortheconverted.blogspot.com/2010/09/chana-punjabi-kosher-ghee-glee.html

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_SsR7UmAjLXc/TI7MI5YPDDI/AAAAAAAAAH4/xvYlwyA7tTU/s400/file_164_4%5B1%5D.jpg)

...............................
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 22, 2011, 11:43:13 AM
In future times it may be necessary to fish and hunt game.
Curing this fish and game to keep it fit for human consumption is going to be really important.
Ed Douglas had suggested adding curing salt to the bartering list example. So that is added, and also
realizing it is important to have some info here on salt curing.
Just an article from wikipedia, for starters, sample recipes, a couple of posts further on.
Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt-cured_meat   Salt cured meat

Salt-cured meat
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
   
Salt-cured meat or salted meat, for example bacon and kippered herring, is meat or fish preserved or cured with salt. Salting, either with dry salt or brine, was the only widely available method of preserving meat until the 19th century. It was frequently called 'junk'[1] or 'salt horse'.[2]

Salt inhibits the growth of microorganisms by drawing water out of microbial cells through osmosis. Concentrations of salt up to 20% are required to kill most species of unwanted bacteria. Smoking, often used in the process of curing meat, adds chemicals to the surface of meat that reduce the concentration of salt required.

Salted meat and fish are a staple of the diet in North Africa, Southern China, and in the Arctic. Salted meat was a staple of the mariner's diet in the Age of Sail. It was stored in barrels, and often had to last for months spent out of sight of land. The basic Royal Navy diet consisted of salted beef, salted pork, ship's biscuit, and oatmeal, supplemented with smaller quantities of peas, cheese and butter. [1] Even in 1938, Eric Newby found the diet on the tall ship Moshulu to consist almost entirely of salted meat. Moshulu's lack of refrigeration left little choice as the ship made voyages which could exceed 100 days passage between ports.

Salt beef in the UK and Commonwealth as a cured and boiled foodstuff is sometimes known as corned beef elsewhere, though traditional salt beef is different in taste and preparation. The use of the term corned comes from the fact that the Middle English word corn could refer to grains of salt as well as cereal grains.
See also

Corned beef   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corned_beef
Curing:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curing_%28food_preservation%29
   
Jerky:         
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerky_%28food%29

Salt pork:     
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_pork

Pastrami:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastrami
   
Dried and salted cod, one of the main preserved sources of protein for centuries around the Atlantic nations:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dried_and_salted_cod  [Going to post this article, next post.]

References

    ^ http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2009/10/original-junk-food.html
    ^ Hughes. R, The Fatal Shore: The Epic of Australia's Founding, Vintage Books, 1988


Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 22, 2011, 11:48:36 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dried_and_salted_cod

Dried and salted cod
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"salt fish" redirects here. For the dish traditionally made with salt cod, see ackee and saltfish.
Salted and dried cod, produced in Norway.

Dried and salted cod, often called salt cod or clipfish (klippfisk in Norwegian, see also other names), is cod which has been preserved by drying after salting. Cod which has been dried without the addition of salt is called stockfish.

With the sharp decline in the world stocks of cod due to overfishing, other white fish are often used instead. Sometimes these other species are labeled as such, and sometimes still misleadingly called "salt cod", so the term has become to some extent a generic name.

Dried and salted cod has been produced in Canada, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Norway and Portugal for over 500 years. It forms a traditional ingredient of the cuisine of many countries around the Atlantic. Traditionally it was dried outdoors by the wind and sun, but today it is usually dried indoors with the aid of electric heaters.

The production of salt cod dates back at least 500 years, to the time of the European discoveries of the Grand Banks off Newfoundland.[citation needed] It formed a vital item of international commerce between the New World and the Old, and formed one leg of the so-called triangular trade. Thus it spread around the Atlantic and became a traditional ingredient not only in Northern European cuisine, but also in Mediterranean, West African, Caribbean, and Brazilian cuisines.

The drying of food is the world's oldest known preservation method, and dried fish has a storage life of several years. Drying preserves many nutrients and is said to make the codfish tastier.[citation needed] The method was cheap, the work could be done by the fisherman or his family, and the resulting product was easily transported to market. Salting became economically feasible during the 17th century, when cheap salt from southern Europe became available to the maritime nations of northern Europe.

Traditionally, salt cod was dried only by the wind and the sun, hanging on wooden scaffolding or lying on clean cliffs or rocks near the seaside.

Dried cod and the dishes made from it are known by many different names, as it became part of the cuisine of many European nations. For example, it is known as bacalhau (Portuguese), bacalao (Spanish), bakaiļao (Basque), bacallà (Catalan), morue (French), baccalà (Italian), ráktoguolli/goikeguolli (Sami), klippfisk/clipfish (Scandinavian), saltfiskur (Icelandic), bakalar (Croatian), and Saltfish (Caribbean).

The word compound bacal- and its variants are of unknown origin; explorer John Cabot reported that it was the name used by the indigenous inhabitants of Newfoundland.[1] When explorer Jacques Cartier 'discovered' the mouth of the St. Lawrence River in what is now Canada and claimed it for France, he noted the presence of a thousand Basque boats fishing for cod.
[edit] Process
Morue for sale at a Nice market

The fish is beheaded and eviscerated, often on board the boat or ship. (This is feasible with whitefish, whereas it would not be with oily fish.) It is then salted and dried ashore. Traditionally the fish was sun-dried on rocks or wooden frames, but today it is mainly dried indoors by electrical heating. It is sold whole or in portions, with or without bones.
Species of fish

Traditionally salt cod was made exclusively of cod. After the collapse of the Grand Banks (and other) cod stocks due to overfishing, some products sold as salt cod are in fact other whitefish, such as pollock, haddock, blue whiting, ling and tusk.
[edit] Quality grades

In Norway, there used to be five different grades of salt cod. The best grade was called superior extra. Then came (in descending order) superior, imperial, universal and popular. These appellations are no longer extensively used, although some producers still make the superior products.

The best klippfisk, the superior extra, is made only from line-caught cod. The fish is always of the skrei, the cod that once a year is caught during spawning. The fish is bled while alive, before the head is cut off. It is then cleaned, filleted and salted. Fishers and connoisseurs alike place a high importance in the fact that the fish is line-caught, because if caught in a net, the fish may be dead before caught, which may result in bruising of the fillets. For the same reason it is believed to be important that the klippfisk be bled while still alive. Superior klippfisk is salted fresh, whereas the cheaper grades of klippfisk might be frozen first. Lower grades are salted by injecting a salt-water solution into the fish, while superior grades are salted with dry salt. The superior extra is dried twice, much like Parma ham. Between the two drying sessions, the fish rests and the flavour matures.

Notes

    ^ OED, s.v. bacalao

References
   Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Dried and salted cod

    Davidson, Alan (1979). North Atlantic Seafood. ISBN 0-670-51524-8.
    Kurlansky, Mark (1997). Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World. New York: Walker. ISBN 0-8027-1326-2.

Photo:
HK Sheung Wan 李陞街 Li Sing Street 掛咸魚 Hanging 3 dried fishes July-2011
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 22, 2011, 12:04:40 PM
A Curing Salt Recipe

First, basic info:
[size=08pt]
"Curing salt contains salt, sodium nitrite, glycerin and FD&C #3 used to color cure accordance with
MDI Bulletin 656 of 1974. Never taste straight or eat on its own!

At these lower temperatures food is said to be in or near the “danger zone” where bacteria are most
able to growing. Curing salt prevents this from happening and creates a safe product to be enjoyed.
Curing salt is also a common ingredient in the preparation of corned beef."

-  http://www.savoryspiceshop.com/spices/sltcur.html   Savory Spice Shop[/size]
...
Home Cured Corned Beef Recipe

    Prep time: 5 days
    Cook time: 3 hours


The spice mix with the gallon of brine makes easily enough curing brine for a 5 pound brisket, cured in a somewhat large-ish container. If you were to use a 2-gallon freezer bag or marinating bag, you would likely need just half (or less) of the amount of brine and brine spices.
Ingredients

Pickling spices:

    1 Tbsp whole allspice berries
    1 Tbsp whole mustard seeds (brown or yellow)
    1 Tbsp coriander seeds
    1 Tbsp red pepper flakes
    1 Tbsp whole cloves
    1 Tbsp whole black peppercorns
    9 whole cardamom pods
    6 large bay leaves, crumbled
    2 teaspoons ground ginger
    1/2 stick cinnamon

Brine:

    1 gallon water
    2 cups Kosher salt
    5 teaspoons pink curing salt*
    3 Tbsp pickling spices
    1/2 cup brown sugar

*Pink curing salt, or sodium nitrite, goes by many names, such as Prague Powder #1 or DQ Curing Salt #1, and is available online and may be available at your local specialty market or butcher shop. If you don't have it, you can still make corned beef, but it is necessary for that vibrant pink color we associate with corned beef. And it adds flavor too. Without it the corned beef will be a dull grey color.

Brisket:

    1 4-5 pound beef brisket
    1 Tbsp pickling spices

Method

home-cured-corned-beef-1.jpghome-cured-corned-beef-2.jpg

1 You can either used store-bought pickling spices or you can make your own. To make your own, toast the allspice berries, mustard seeds, coriander seeds, red pepper flakes, cloves, peppercorns, and cardamom pods in a small frying pan on high heat until fragrant and you hear the mustard seeds start to pop. Remove from heat and place in a small bowl. Use a mortar and pestle to crush the spices a little (or the back of a spoon or the side of a knife on a flat surface). Add to a small bowl and stir in the crumbled bay leaves and ground ginger.

2 Add about 3 Tbsp of the spice mix (reserve the rest for cooking the corned beef after it has cured), plus the half stick of cinnamon, to a gallon of water in a large pot, along with the Kosher salt, pink salt (if using), and brown sugar. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Then refrigerate until well chilled.

home-cured-corned-beef-3.jpghome-cured-corned-beef-4.jpg

3 Place the brisket in a large, flat container or pan, and cover with the brine. The brine should cover the meat. The meat may float in which case you may want to weigh it down with a plate. Alternatively you can use a 2-gallon freezer bag (placed in a container so if it leaks it doesn't leak all over your refrigerator), place the brisket in the freezer bag and about 2 quarts of brine, squeezing out the air from the bag before sealing. Place in the refrigerator and chill from 5-7 days. Every day flip the brisket over, so that all sides get brined equally.

home-cured-corned-beef-5.jpghome-cured-corned-beef-6a.jpg

4 At the end of the cure, remove the brisket from the brine and rinse off the brine with cold water. Place the brisket in a large pot that just fits around the brisket and cover with at least one inch of water. If you want your brisket less salty, add another inch of water to the pot. Add a tablespoon of the pickling spices to the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce to a very low simmer (barely bubbling), and cook 3-4 hours, until the corned beef is fork tender. (At this point you can store in the fridge for up to a week.) Remove the meat to a cutting board. (You can use the spiced cooking liquid to cook vegetables for boiled dinner or corned beef and cabbage.) Slice thinly against the grain to serve.

Illustrations on page:  http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/home_cured_corned_beef/
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on January 13, 2012, 12:44:59 PM
Guv-n/mint info on hunting deer and butchering and preparing venison.
- Yowbarb
...
http://mdc.mo.gov/hunting-trapping/deer/butchering-and-freezing-venison

................................................................................

VENISON
Butchering and Freezing Venison
This content is archived
Published on: Apr. 9, 2010

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on March 12, 2012, 07:33:19 AM
" 20 Uses for Leftover Fruit and Vegetable Rinds and Peels "  at:

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/20-uses-leftover-fruit-vegetable-rinds-and-peels.html (http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/20-uses-leftover-fruit-vegetable-rinds-and-peels.html)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: steedy on March 12, 2012, 07:59:31 AM
Last night I watched part of a show about You Don't Know Dixie, and they had some guy on there making moonshine.  I thought about it later and realized that that would be a good thing to have on hand.  With the very high alcohol content, it would be good as an antiseptic cleanser, or overall house cleaner too!  Plus, if you aged it in charred barrels, you get whiskey.  Anyway, I thought having your own still may be a practical thing.  But, how do you make it?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: probe64322 on March 12, 2012, 02:12:04 PM
Here you go steedy

Code: [Select]
http://www.ibiblio.org/moonshine/make/make.html
Code: [Select]
http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-moonshine
Code: [Select]
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-moonshine/
P.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: steedy on March 13, 2012, 07:40:04 AM
Thanks probe!  Now all I have to do is find a spot to hide my still from the revenuers!  ;)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 13, 2012, 07:41:28 AM
Last night I watched part of a show about You Don't Know Dixie, and they had some guy on there making moonshine.  I thought about it later and realized that that would be a good thing to have on hand.  With the very high alcohol content, it would be good as an antiseptic cleanser, or overall house cleaner too!  Plus, if you aged it in charred barrels, you get whiskey.  Anyway, I thought having your own still may be a practical thing.  But, how do you make it?

Great idea!
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 13, 2012, 07:43:54 AM
Here you go steedy

Code: [Select]
http://www.ibiblio.org/moonshine/make/make.html
Code: [Select]
http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-moonshine
Code: [Select]
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-moonshine/
P.[/size]

Thank You Mr. probe64322 !
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 16, 2012, 09:06:48 AM
I always do my corned beef and cabbage by guess and by golly...so I don't have a recipe to post. I always use a big piece of corned beef, with the spice packet, and add hunks of potato and cabbage and baby carrots or chopped up big carrots toward the end of the cooking time. The recipe below has a technique worth noting a way to prevent the meat from overcooking  so it is wonderfully tender...
- Yowbarb
==============================================
http://coronadelmar.patch.com/articles/recipe-for-corned-beef-and-cabbage-let-s-do-it-right-how-to-slice-cabbage-irish-recipe-for-corned-beef-and-cabbage-for-st-patricks-day

Recipe for Corned Beef And Cabbage: Let's Do It Right!
St. Patrick's Day is just around the corner and who isn't thinking about corned beef dinner already?
 
March 15, 2012

Surprisingly, corned beef and cabbage is not an Irish tradition. It is an Irish-American tradition. Corned pork and cabbage is more common in the Emerald Isles, but Irish immigrants to the U.S. found beef more plentiful in their lower Manhattan ghettos where the butchers were mostly kosher and pork was verboten.

Traditional on St. Patrick's Day when everyone is Irish -- it is not served more often -- and my guess is that people just take it out of the wrapper and throw it in a pot with carrots, potatoes, cabbage and maybe some onions, and they feel they have met their obligation. But everything is soooooo salty, the meat is tough and fatty, and the veggies and potatoes are mushy.

Here's how to do the dish properly. If you have leftovers, make Rockin' Reuben Sandwiches, or Corned Beef Hash. But if you do it right, there won't be leftovers.

Makes. 6 servings (the meat shrinks quite a bit)
Preparation time. 10 minutes
Cooking time. 3 to 4 hours

Ingredients
 1 (3 pound) slab of corned beef, preferably home made
 2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
 2 tablespoons pickling spices, preferably home made
 4 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1" segments
 2 pounds of potatoes, cleaned and cut into 2" chunks
 1 small head of cabbage, outer leaves removed, cut in quarters

A good idea. While the meat is cooking, mix up some of my Secretariat Horseradish Sauce and refrigerate for at least two hours to let the flavors marry. Serve it on the side as a sauce.

Do this
 1) Open the package the meat came in and dump out all the liquid. Rinse thoroughly. Trim off all the fat cap. If you have made your own corned beef, and you should, it is just plain better, remove it from the brine, and rinse it well.

2) Corned beef is essentially pickled in salt, and straight out of the pack it is way too salty. Before we can eat this cured meat, we need to cook it and desalinate it a bit. Place the beef in a large pot along with enough hot water to cover it by at least 1" and put the lid on.

Turn the heat to medium and bring to a low simmer for 30 minutes. Do not let it boil. If you boil it, it will get tough and shrink. Beware that the meat is cold, so when it warms the water will slowly move from simmer to boil. Keep an eye on it and do not let it boil. After 30 minutes, dump out the water and cover the meat with fresh hot water. This time add the pickling spices.

Bring to a low simmer again, this time for 1 hour. Again dump the water and pickling spices and replace it with fresh hot water. Bring to a simmer and let it simmer for 1 hour. Add the carrots. After 30 minutes add the potatoes. After 10 minutes add the cabbage. After 15 minutes the cabbage will be done and so should everything else.

3) Remove the meat and place it on a carving board. There are often two horizontal muscles separated by a thick layer of fat. Separate them by sliding a knife through the fat. Carve and/or scrape off the fat layer. Carve the meat by cutting across the grain about the thickness of a pencil. Any thinner and it will fall apart, any thicker and it will be chewy.

5) Lift out the cabbage, potatoes and carrots and divide them into serving bowls. Place the meat in the bowl. Spoon some of the cooking liquid over them and serve. Happy Holiday!

—Huffington Post
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 16, 2012, 10:09:42 AM
Recipe for Corned Beef And Cabbage: Let's Do It Right!

Makes. 6 servings (the meat shrinks quite a bit)
Preparation time. 10 minutes
Cooking time. 3 to 4 hours

Ingredients
 
 1 (3 pound) slab of corned beef, preferably home made
 2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
 2 tablespoons pickling spices, preferably home made
 4 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1" segments
 2 pounds of potatoes, cleaned and cut into 2" chunks
 1 small head of cabbage, outer leaves removed, cut in quarters

A good idea. While the meat is cooking, mix up some of my Secretariat Horseradish Sauce and refrigerate for at least two hours to let the flavors marry. Serve it on the side as a sauce.

Do this
Open the package the meat came in and dump out all the liquid. Rinse thoroughly. Trim off all the fat cap. If you have made your own corned beef, and you should, it is just plain better, remove it from the brine, and rinse it well.

Corned beef is essentially pickled in salt, and straight out of the pack it is way too salty. Before we can eat this cured meat, we need to cook it and desalinate it a bit. Place the beef in a large pot along with enough hot water to cover it by at least 1" and put the lid on.

Turn the heat to medium and bring to a low simmer for 30 minutes. Do not let it boil. If you boil it, it will get tough and shrink. Beware that the meat is cold, so when it warms the water will slowly move from simmer to boil. Keep an eye on it and do not let it boil. After 30 minutes, dump out the water and cover the meat with fresh hot water. This time add the pickling spices.

Bring to a low simmer again, this time for 1 hour. Again dump the water and pickling spices and replace it with fresh hot water. Bring to a simmer and let it simmer for 1 hour. Add the carrots. After 30 minutes add the potatoes. After 10 minutes add the cabbage. After 15 minutes the cabbage will be done and so should everything else.

Remove the meat and place it on a carving board. There are often two horizontal muscles separated by a thick layer of fat. Separate them by sliding a knife through the fat. Carve and/or scrape off the fat layer. Carve the meat by cutting across the grain about the thickness of a pencil. Any thinner and it will fall apart, any thicker and it will be chewy.

Lift out the cabbage, potatoes and carrots and divide them into serving bowls. Place the meat in the bowl. Spoon some of the cooking liquid over them and serve. Happy Holiday!

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 09, 2012, 08:06:18 AM
http://www.chiaseedrecipes.com/   Chia Seed Recipes

http://www.chiaseedrecipes.com/40-ways-to-use-chia-seeds.php

40 Ways to use Chia Seeds
How to use chia seeds.
Wondering how to use chia seeds?  Chia seeds are very easy to incorporate into your diet. Below is a list of ways I have used them in my recipes. I would love to hear of your unique ways of using chia seeds.
1. Mix 1 dessertspoon of chia seeds with a quarter cup of water to make an egg substitute for baking cakes and cookies.
2. Add chia seeds to apple juice to make “sago”.
3. Grind seeds and add to hot milk to make a “porridge”
 4. Mix seeds through yogurt.
5. Add seeds to soup to thicken.
6. Grind seeds and mix with flour, milk and eggs to make pancakes.
7. Add seeds to salad dressings.
8. Eat Chia seeds whole and raw as a snack.
9. Add whole seeds to diluted fruit juice to make  Chia Fresca.
10. Make Chia Pudding by adding whole seeds to milk, nut milk or soy milk.
11. Blend chia seeds into smoothies.
12. Make a “lassie” by blending chia seeds, yogurt and fruit juice.
13. Add chia seeds to beaten eggs, soak for 10 minutes and make an omelette.
14. Mix with worcestershire or bbq sauce and brush over barbequed meats.
 15. Add ground chia seeds to flour when making bread.
16.  Make chia pan bread by combining chia seeds, eggs, milk, flour and baking powder. Cook in a heavy based pan with a lid on.
17. Add whole chia seeds to a cake batter to make a heavy poppy seed like cake.
18. Add seeds to stews to thicken.
19. Throw some seeds into a stir fry.
20. Make a thin batter of ground chia seeds and milk and cook in a slow oven to make crackers.
21. Sprinkle seeds over a salad.
22. Pureed fruit, chia seeds and a little fruit juice is a good topping for ice cream.
23. Stir whole seeds through cooked lentils.
24. Soak seeds in beaten eggs and use this mix to make a frittata.
25. Cook brown rice in vegetable stock and stir chia seeds through when rice is cooked.
26. Top a cheesecake with chia seeds soaked in fruit juice to make a gel toppingl.
27. Add whole or ground seeds to cookie mixes.
28. Mix ground seeds with ground beef to make meatballs.
29. Cook brown rice in apple juice, add grated apple and stir whole chia seeds through the mixture for a tasty dessert.
30. Toasted ground chia seeds mixed with honey and cinnamon makes a wonderful base for cheesecake.
31. Add whole seeds to granola.
32. Mix white chia seeds that have been soaked in milk through mashed potatoes.
33. Sprout the seeds and use in salads.
34. Mix ground seeds with butter or peanut butter for a nutritious spread.
35. Cinnamon, ground chia and butter is great on hot scones.
36. Add a desert spoon of black seeds to a green jelly mix for “frogs egg jelly”.
37. Spread a mixture of honey, cinnamon, dried fruit and ground chia on to filo or puff pastry sheets, roll up and cook in a hot oven.
 38. Mix the seeds, whole or ground through Nutella.
39. Add ground seeds soaked in an egg to bind a hamburger mix.
40. Soak chia seeds in milk and mix through hot oatmeal.
.
The more I use chia seeds, the more ways I find to add them to my diet.
Here are even more ways to use chia seeds
 
41. Add half black and half white chia seeds to custard to make “polka dot custard” – great for kids
42. Make a pasta sauce by blending chia seeds, cooked cauliflower and vegetable stock
43. Don’t waste left over liquid from a stew. Add chia seeds, allow to thicken, then heat and serve with toast
44. Add ground or whole chia seeds to your favorite stuffing mixture
45. Whisk a dessertspoon of chia seeds into coconut water. This is especially good on a hot day for keeping hydrated and an excellent idea for athletes. It’s so effective and healthy I feel it will soon be marketed as a sports drink.
46. Want a crunchy breakfast? Add half to one tablespoon of chia seeds to crunchy toasted muesli. Add milk, fruit juice, soy or nut milk and eat immediately. The chia seeds will retain their crunch.
47. Add ground chia seeds to your favorite fish cake recipe

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 09, 2012, 08:07:56 AM
http://www.chiaseedrecipes.com/chia-gel.php  Chia Gel


Chia Gel
To make Chia gel, just add liquid to chia seeds, its as simple as that, no mystery. This is because Chia seeds absorb liquid and this also makes the seed soft.
Raw, unsoaked chia seeds are hard and crunchy. They can be eaten raw, the taste being very mild and nut-like. Making a chia gel softens the seeds and makes them easier to eat and more versatile for use in recipes. An added benefit is that the soaked Chia seeds absorb the flavour of whatever liquid they are soaked in, making some interesting flavour combinations possible.
You can soak chia seeds in water, milk, nut milk, fruit juice, stock, gravies, eggs, vegetable juice, or whatever other liquid you would like to try.
I prefer to soak my chia seeds whenever I use them whole unless I want a crunchy texture.
To make a basic chia gel.
Ingredients
1 or 2 tablespoons of chia seeds
1 cup of liquid
Method
In a bowl, add the seeds to the liquid, and whisk them in with a fork or whisk.
After a few minutes you will need to whisk the gel again to make sure  seeds
don’t clump together in the bottom of your bowl. Leave to stand for 10 to 15 minutes.
This enables the seeds to absorb the liquid.  Two tablespoons of chia seeds to one cup of liquid makes a very thick gel.
To make a fruity chia gel
Ingredients
2 tablespoons chia seeds
1 cup of fruit juice. I like to use orange/mango. Any fruit juice will do and you can also use your own freshly made juice.
Method
Whisk together in a bowl and leave to stand, making sure to stir to prevent clumping.
I like to use fruity chia gel as a topping over cheesecake, icecream or yoghurt.
It can be eaten on its own. Kids seem to love its fruity taste.
Ideas
A good idea is to have some water based chia gel on hand in the fridge to add as an egg or butter substiute to cakes or cookies, one tablespoon of gel replaces one egg. Replace half the butter with an equal portion of gel.  Prepared chia gel will keep for up to 2 weeks. To make an egg substitute I use 3 teaspoons of chia seeds to one third of a cup of water to replace one egg
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 09, 2012, 08:14:22 AM
There's about 30 chia seed recipes on this site, listed below. Will be posting them individually. Chia can be used in baking.
Posting here one baking recipe. Note: Quinoa flour is rather expensive but some sites offer it at bulk discounts. A person could grind their own with a grinder.
Yowbarb
...
http://www.chiaseedrecipes.com/40-ways-to-use-chia-seeds.php

Chia Pinole Cookies
Chia pinole cookies – revised version
This version has more honey and no baking powder. I have also changed the method of mixing.
It gives a sweeter and crisper cookie, and my family likes it better.  The original recipe is below.
The ingredients below are for 16 cookies
 
Ingredients
 
4 Tablespoons of chia seeds
1 dessert spoon of cinnamon
4 Tablespoons of flour (quinoa flour if available)
2 Tablespoons of rolled oats
2 Tablespoons of chopped dried fruit
4 Tablespoons of honey
2 eggs
 
Method
 
Grind the chia seeds in a blender or coffee grinder
Add the cinnamon, flour and rolled oats
Toast these ingredients carefully in a frying pan until very slightly brown
Allow to cool
Add the dried fruit
Blend the eggs and honey in a blender and stir into the dry ingredients
Place spoonfulls of the mixture on a greased baking tray and flatten them out
Bake in a moderate oven for about 20 minutes
..
.
Chia pinole cookies original

This mixture makes 8 cookies – double the quantities below to make 16.
Eating 4 cookies will give you 1 tablespoon of chia seeds. They are very filling and very nourishing.
Ingredients
2 tablespoons chia seeds
1-2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 and a half tablespoons honey
1 Tablespoon sultanas (sultana grapes)
1 Tablespoon chopped dates
1 Tablespoons quinoa flour or other plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 Tablespoon rolled oats
1 egg
Method
Make chia pinole
Grind the chia seeds into a fine powder in a coffee grinder or blender with a grinding attachment.
In a heavy bottomed frypan heat the ground chia until it is starting to brown slightly.
Take of the heat and transfer to a mixing bowl.
Add the cinnamon and mix well.
Add the honey and mix through until the mixture is the consistency of breadcrumbs.
Put flour, baking powder and rolled oats into a bowl. Mix well.
Add the pinole mix and the dried fruits and combine together.
Beat the egg and add to the cookie mixture.
Take spoonfuls of the cookie mixture and press onto an oiled baking tray.
Cook in a medium over for 20 minutes.

Posted in Chia Recipes and ideas

http://www.chiaseedrecipes.com/40-ways-to-use-chia-seeds.php
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 15, 2012, 04:29:19 PM
http://www.nomeatathlete.com/tarahumara-pinole-chia-recipes/

Tarahumara Pinole and Chia
Written by Matt Frazier in Training Food

In case you’re one of the six remaining runners on the planet who have yet to read Born to Run, allow me to explain.  The Tarahumara are “the running people” on which most of the book is based, a Mexican tribe of superathletes who run 50 or 100 miles at a time for pure enjoyment, seemingly without effort.
   
The Tarahumara diet is described in some small detail in the book, with repeated mention of two staples — pinole and chia seeds.  The author relates a few stories that ascribe almost magical, endurance-enhancing qualities to these simple foods.
Below are two basic recipes I experimented with. 

Pinole recipe
Pinole seems to describe any of a variety of forms of parched or roasted corn, ground into a flour and combined with water and some spices or sugar.  It can be made into a drink, an oatmeal-like paste, or baked to form a more-portable “cake.”  Here’s a recipe I made using regular cornmeal; you can change the proportions and spices to suit your taste.  If you don’t want to toast your own corn, you can get pinole at Amazon.com.  (Note: Masa harina is probably more authentic than cornmeal, since that corn has been treated with lime, the way the Tarahumara maize is.)

Ingredients:

1/2 cup cornmeal, ground as fine as possible
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 Tbsp brown sugar, honey, or agave nectar
chia seeds (optional)
Toast the cornmeal in a skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until it turns light brown, about 5 minutes.  Transfer to a bowl, mix in cinnamon, and sweetener or other spices, and desired amount of water (see below).
   
You can add a lot of water to make a drink of it, but I found this kind of weird because the corn didn’t dissolve.  If you add just a few tablespoons of water instead and mix, you get an oatmeal-like consistency that can be eaten with a spoon, or even out of the palm of your hand on a run:
   
Alternatively, you can bake the paste at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-15 minutes until it has the texture of a brownie.  This more portable form is better for carrying on a long run, and a good alternative to sugary energy gels.
   
Pinole, in the form of energy bars, waffles, and more...

This tasted ok (not great), but I found it pretty inconvenient to actually bring along on a run. It was hard to keep the biscuit from crumbling, and really, who is going to make a paste in the palm of their hand on a run?

To make pinole more convenient (and the type of thing you could actually bring on a run without making a mess), I worked with a baker to come up with 15 new pinole and chia recipes, so that we could get pinole in the form of energy bars, waffles, muffins, hand pies, and other running food. The recipes turned out really well, and all of them tasted way better than these initial experiments with plain pinole did.

Click here to learn more about the project, Fuel Your Run with Pinole and Chia.
http://pinolerecipes.com/

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/tarahumara-pinole-chia-recipes/
Chia fresca (iskiate) recipe
   
Chia seeds (yep, the same ones used in Chia Pets) have enjoyed a surge in popularity recently among health-foodies.   There are many purported benefits of chia seeds, and legends abound about chia seeds reviving struggling athletes or warriors, with small amounts sustaining men for long periods of time.

As for buying chia seeds, I get white chia seeds at iHerb.com.  White chia seeds, also called salba, are an heirloom variety, so they’re the closest thing you’ll get to what the runners and warriors in the all chia legends were eating.  BONUS:  Use the coupon code RAZ652 at checkout to get $5.00 off your first order at iHerb.com.  That’s half the cost of the chia seeds!  Alternatively, you can get your chia seeds on Amazon.com.

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/tarahumara-pinole-chia-recipes/

..................
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 15, 2012, 04:31:36 PM
http://www.nomeatathlete.com/tarahumara-pinole-chia-recipes/

Chia seeds have the interesting property that when they’re left in water for a few minutes, the water begins to gel.  Supposedly this is helpful in digestion.  Here’s a recipe for chia fresca (also called iskiate), a popular drink made with chia seeds, water, and lemon or lime.

chia fresca (also called iskiate

Ingredients:

about 10 oz of water
1 Tbsp dry chia seeds
a few teaspoons lemon or lime juice
honey or agave nectar, to taste (optional)
Stir the chia seeds into the water; let them sit for about five minutes.  Stir again, and let sit for as long as you like.  The more it sits, the more gel-like the seeds and water become.  Add citrus juice and sweetener to taste.
....................   
I found chia fresca to be a refreshing drink for the morning, and I swear I felt an energy boost from it.  (But the placebo effect can be strong with me, so try for yourself.) But I really don’t like the gel consistency in the drink. I now choose to get my chia in smoothies, like the strawberry-iskiate smoothie from Fuel Your Run with Pinole and Chia.

###
(end quote)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 25, 2012, 07:37:12 AM
http://www.ehow.com/how_2119645_make-dandelion-coffee.html

How to Make Dandelion Coffee
By an eHow Contributor

"Surprisingly enough, dandelion roots make a very good coffee substitute. Naturally caffeine-free, dandelion root coffee tastes like regular coffee, but has many additional herbal benefits. Dandelion contains anti-oxidants that improve the function of the liver, gallbladder, kidneys and digestive system. You can buy dandelion root coffee, or you can make it yourself."

Instructions

Get the Right Dandelion Roots for Your Coffee

1      Grow dandelions in your garden. When you purposefully grow dandelions for harvesting, you
         can encourage large root growth by planting in loose, tilled soil. Dandelions that grow as weeds
         are often in compacted soil that produces only small roots.

2      Harvest dandelion roots in the early spring or fall to get the most nutritional value. However,
         dandelions can be harvested anytime to make coffee.

3      Pick bunches with lots of greens above the ground to have the best chance of finding big,
        quality roots.

4      Cut the roots off the dandelion bunch with a knife.

Prepare Dandelion Roots to Make Coffee

5     Clean the dandelion roots thoroughly. You can do each root by hand or plunge the roots into water repeatedly.

6     Cut the roots into smaller pieces and grind them up in a food processor.

   Spread the ground dandelion pieces out evenly on cookie sheets. Multiple cookie sheets
       should be used to minimize cooking time.

8     Roast the dandelion roots at 250 degrees F for 2 hours.

9     Stir the dandelion roots periodically as they roast to promote even cooking.

10   Grind the roasted dandelion roots in a coffee grinder or food processor to use in an automatic
       coffee maker.

11    Brew the dandelion coffee just as you would regular coffee.


Read more: How to Make Dandelion Coffee | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2119645_make-dandelion-coffee.html#ixzz27UWEYXqL

Yowbarb Note:
How to make cancer killing dandelion root tea: VIDEO:  http://youtu.be/hvg2bd-QjM0

........................
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 25, 2012, 11:30:15 AM
I forgot to mention the cancer - killing properties of dandelion root. To be honest, this was new data for me!
Yowbarb
....................................

Also posted here:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=810.msg62595#msg62595

Survivalist / Re: Healing plants and herbs

Today at 07:50:52 AM
Video: How to make cancer killing dandelion root tea 5:45
  http://youtu.be/hvg2bd-QjM0


Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 03, 2012, 12:14:19 PM
http://www.food.com/recipe/spaghetti-for-100-or-oamc-89357  Food.com Spaghetti for 100

b]Recipe #89357    Total Time:  3 hrs 20 mins   Prep Time:  20 mins   Cook Time:  3 hrs[/b]

Note:
"A hearty meat sauce makes this spaghetti a crowd pleaser.
Even though this recipe serves 100 people, it is very easy to make. This needs to simmer for 2
or 3 hours, so make it well in advance. You can even make the sauce the day before --
on the day of your event, just boil the noodles and reheat the sauce. Allow sauce to cool, divide
into containers and freeze."


INGREDIENTS:

6 lbs ground beef
2 cups chopped onions
16 cloves garlic, minced
12 (29 ounce) cans tomato sauce
4 (18 ounce) cans tomato paste
1/4 cup salt
3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons dried basil
2 tablespoons dried oregano
2 tablespoons italian seasoning
13 lbs spaghetti noodles, cooked and drained

Directions:

1    In a large stockpot, brown beef, onion, and garlic, then drain.

2    Add tomato sauce, tomato paste, salt, sugar, and seasonings, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a
      low simmer.

3    Cover and allow to simmer for 2 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally.

4    Serve sauce over cooked noodles.

5    This recipe makes about 50 cups of sauce-if making for OAMC, allow sauce to cool completely, divide
      into appropriate portions and freeze in airtight containers.
OAMC = Once A Month Cooking.

Read more at: http://www.food.com/recipe/spaghetti-for-100-or-oamc-89357?oc=linkback

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 03, 2012, 12:38:46 PM
Most people will eat spaghetti...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: enlightenme on October 03, 2012, 02:08:53 PM
 :P  ;D
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 03, 2012, 11:01:13 PM
:P  ;D

Dang that was good spaghetti but now it's all gone!   ;D
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2012, 10:29:55 AM
Here's a survival food not everyone has heard of. It's similar to Chinese Wonton or Italian filled pastas. I do know it is filling and made of simple ingeredients which might be present in a survival community. These dumplings require eggs and sometimes goat cheese so it is possible people will be raising/producing these things. Most people would be storing large quantities of flour, salt and oil, since there are so many things which can be made of these basic ingredients, adding whatever is on hand.
- Yowbarb
...
(http://www.kosherscoop.com/editorfiles/kreplach-how-to.jpg)
...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kreplach  Kreplach

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Kreplach
Details - Dumpling
Main ingredient(s) Dough: flour, water and eggs
Filling: vegetables, ground meat, mashed potatoes or other
 
Kreplach (from Yiddish: קרעפּלעך kreplekh, קרעפפּל krepl neut. sg.) are small dumplings filled with ground meat, mashed potatoes or another filling, usually boiled and served in chicken soup. They are similar to Italian tortellini and Chinese wontons. The dough is traditionally made of flour, water and eggs, kneaded and rolled out thin. Nowadays, they are often made with frozen dough sheets or wonton wrappers. Ready-made Kreplach are also sold in the kosher freezer section of supermarkets. In many Ashkenazi homes, kreplach are served on Rosh Hashanah, at the pre-fast meal before Yom Kippur, and on Hoshana Raba.  Kreplach with vegetarian or dairy fillings are also eaten on Purim because the hidden nature of the kreplach interior mimics the "hidden" nature of the Purim miracle. A variety with a sweet cheese filling is served as a starter or main dish in dairy meals, specifically on Shavuot. Stuffed pasta may have migrated from Venice to the Ashkenazi Jews in Germany during the 14th century.
 
The word krepl is probably derived from the Old High German kraepfo meaning grape. The Middle English word grapple is related (from a grape vine hook.)
 
Similar dishes
 
Dishes similar to kreplach are Baozi, Buuz, Guotie, Gyoza, Jiaozi, Kalduny, Khinkali, Mandu, Mantı, Maultasche, Momo, Pelmeni, Pierogi, Ravioli, Tortellini, Schlutzkrapfen, Kärntner Nudeln, Tortellini and Wontons.

..............................
A sample, just one recipe for now:

http://www.joyofkosher.com/recipe/dairy-kreplach-dumplings/

Dairy Kreplach (Dumplings)
Classic Jewish Kreplach with a twist, filled with a cheese mixture.

Ingredients:
Dough 1 cup of water
2 tablespoons butter (1 oz.)
1 tsp salt
10.5 oz sifted flour about 2 cups
1 egg

Cheese Filling
 10.5 oz Farmer cheese or Ricotta
2 Tbs chopped chives
1-2 Tbs chopped dill
3 1/2 oz. soft goat's cheese
1/2 cup grated Parmesan, Pecorino or Kashkaval cheese (50 g)
1 egg yolk
Salt and pepper to taste
1 Tbs sifted flour

Directions

Bring water with butter and salt to a boil. Remove from heat, add the flour and stir with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and stir immediately.
 
Let it cool to room temperature, cover the dough with cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour.
 
In the meantime – prepare the cheese filling (you may need to double the amount but start with this basic recipe and if you need more – prepare it later). Mix all the ingredients together and refrigerate.
 
Divide dough and roll it out on a well-floured board. Make sure the dough is very thin but not paper-thin, as it has to hold the filling and not rip while cooking.
 
There are two options at this point: You can cut 2.5X2.5 inch squares to create triangular shaped Kreplach or Cut 2.5 inches (6.5 cm) circles with a cookie cutter or a glass to create tortellini-shaped dumplings.
[ PHOTOS below -  triangular shaped kreplach and the round kreplach ]

 Place a teaspoon of filling in the center of the square and fold the dough over the filling to create half a circle. Press gently with your fingers to seal the dumpling.
 
Place on a well floured pan and freeze for at least half an hour.
 
At this point you can store the Kreplach in plastic bags or boxes and freeze until using.
 
Bring a pot of water to a vigorous boil, add 1 tablespoon salt, drop in the kreplach, and cook for about 10-15 minutes.
 
Place in a serving dish, drizzle with olive oil or melted butter, sprinkle Parmesan cheese and voila !
 
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 12, 2012, 10:40:33 AM
Tina Wasserman Recipes and more Home Page:  http://www.cookingandmore.com/

http://www.cookingandmore.com/chicken-soup-with-kreplach/

Chicken Soup With Kreplach

In Medieval times Jews would place a wish for the New Year on a piece of paper and seal it in dough. They wore this sealed dough around their necks as amulets. Serving Kreplach (triangles of dough sealed around a meat filling) in soup on Kol Nidre night is an off shoot of this practice. We all wish to be sealed in the book of life for the coming year.
 
The following recipe is made easier by using prepared wonton skins. The only drawback is that these kreplach will be delicate instead of chewy like your grandmothers’s!
 
Ingredients
 1 4-5 pound fowl or yearling (soup chicken), roaster will do
 5 quarts water or water to cover
 1 parsnip, peeled and cut into thirds
 1 large onion, peeled but left whole
 1 turnip, peeled and cut into quarters
 2 stalks celery with leaves cut into thirds
 3 or more carrots, peeled and sliced into 1 inch lengths
 Fresh dill, 3 or more sprigs to taste
 Fresh parsley, 2 sprigs or more if parsnip isn’t being used
 Salt and pepper to taste
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Preparation Instructions
 1.Cut the chicken into pieces. Place pieces in a large soup pot and cover with water.
 2.Bring the water to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes skimming the top of the liquid of all the brown foam.
 3.Add the remaining ingredients and cook over a low heat until the chicken is quite tender and the vegetables are soft, about 2 to 3 hours.
 4.Remove the chicken with a slotted spoon. Discard the dill and parsley. Remove the vegetables to nibble on and save the carrot for later use in the soup. Strain the soup so that it is nice and clear.
 5.Place the soup in a clean pot and add the carrots and cooked kreplach and heat until nice and hot. Serve.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KREPLACH
 1/2-pound fresh ravioli dough or wonton skins
 2 cups cooked meat, finely chopped (meat shreds from your sliced pot roast are perfect!)
 1 medium onion finely chopped
 1-teaspoon chicken fat
 Salt and pepper to taste
 1 egg, slightly beaten
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.Cut dough into 2 inch squares.
 Combine the meat, onion (here you are using it raw, but if you like, sautéed onion may be used instead), chicken fat, salt and pepper and egg. Set aside.
 2.Place a teaspoon of filling on each square.
 3.Add a little water to the dish used for the beaten egg.
 4.Brush the top edges of the dough with a little egg/water wash.
 Fold the dough in half on the diagonal to make a triangle. Pinch the edges together to make a seal. Press the back of a fork around the edge to crimp and seal again.
 Cook in boiling salted water for 10 minutes or until done. Serve in the chicken soup or alternatively, fry in a little oil.
 
NOTE: Wonton skins will make the kreplach a little thinner than Bubbe’s!

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on December 28, 2012, 10:00:47 AM
http://www.inpraiseofleftovers.com/blog/2011/1/26/fiery-homemade-kimchi.html

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/homemade-kimchi.aspx   Fiery Homemade Kimchi

Kimchi
by Debra Samuels

Homemade kimchi paste provides the flavor base for this tangy, assertive condiment. Use leftover paste to make another batch of kimchi or add it to stews, soups, or sauces for a spicy kick.Yields 2 cups kimchi paste; 6 to 8 cups kimchi

For the kimchi paste
1 cup gochu garu (coarse Korean red pepper flakes)
3 Tbs. dark brown sugar
1 Tbs. kosher salt or sea salt
1 medium apple, unpeeled, cored and quartered
1/2 medium yellow onion, peeled
6 to 8 oil-packed anchovy fillets, drained
5 medium cloves garlic, peeled
1 oz. (about 1 inch) fresh ginger, peeled and thickly sliced

For the kimchi
1 (2-lb.) napa cabbage, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 8 sections, then crosswise into 2- to 3-inch rectangular pieces (about 15 cups)
2 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. kosher salt or sea salt
3/4 lb. daikon radish, peeled and cut into matchsticks (about 2 cups)
1 tsp. granulated sugar
8 to 10 scallions, halved lengthwise and then cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces
5 medium cloves garlic, cut into matchsticks 2 oz. (about 2 inches) fresh ginger, peeled and cut into matchsticks
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Make the kimchi paste
In a medium bowl, combine the gochu garu with 1/2 cup water. Add the sugar and salt and mix well. Set aside.

In a food processor, purée the apple, onion, anchovies, garlic, and ginger until smooth. Add the purée to the red pepper paste and mix thoroughly. Refrigerate the paste in an airtight container for at least 24 hours before using. It will keep for up to 3 months in the refrigerator.
 
Prepare the kimchi
Put a third of the cabbage in an extra-large bowl. Sprinkle with 2 tsp. of the salt. Top with another third of the cabbage and sprinkle with 2 tsp. salt. Repeat with the remaining cabbage and 2 tsp. salt. Put a piece of plastic wrap directly on the cabbage and then weigh down with four 1-lb. cans. Let the cabbage rest at room temperature for 3 hours.

Remove the cans, transfer the cabbage to a colander, rinse briefly, and let drain. Clean the bowl. Take handfuls of the cabbage, squeeze out any excess liquid, and put the squeezed cabbage in the bowl; set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the daikon, the remaining 1 tsp. salt, and the sugar. Let rest for 15 minutes.

With your hands, rub the daikon strips until they’re soft and pliable. Drain the daikon in a colander. Wipe out the bowl. Gather the daikon into a ball and squeeze out any liquid; return to the bowl.

Add the scallions, garlic, and ginger to the daikon and toss to distribute. Add the daikon mixture to the cabbage and toss again.

Open a gallon-size-zip-top bag; set aside. Wearing disposable plastic gloves, use your hands to mix 3/4 cup of the kimchi paste with the cabbage mixture. Be sure the cabbage mixture is thoroughly coated with the kimchi paste; season to taste with salt.

Put the cabbage in the plastic bag. Remove and discard the gloves. Seal the bag three-quarters of the way.

 Starting from the bottom of the bag, roll the bag forward to expel air. Try to prevent liquid from seeping out of the bag. When you have almost reached the top, seal the bag completely. Unroll the bag and put it on a baking sheet. Let the kimchi ferment at room temperature for 24 hours.

 Transfer the kimchi and its liquid to a sterile wide-mouth 1.5-liter (or half-gallon) glass jar and refrigerate. (The kimchi should be stored in one jar, not divided into multiple jars.) It will be ready after 24 hours, though some may prefer the more fermented taste the kimchi acquires after 2 to 3 days. Kimchi will last in the refrigerator for at least 4 weeks.
 
nutrition information (per serving):
Size : per 1/2 cup; Calories (kcal): 100; Fat (g): 3.5; Fat Calories (kcal): 30; Saturated Fat (g): 0.5; Protein (g): 7; Monounsaturated Fat (g): 1; Carbohydrates (g): 12; Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 1; Sodium (mg): 1330; Cholesterol (mg): 15; Fiber (g): 3;

photo: Scott Phillips
 
From Fine Cooking 109 , pp. 18
 
December 30, 2010
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on April 03, 2013, 12:45:27 PM
http://foodfromtheroots.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-science-behind-kimchi.html

The science behind Kimchi

Sunday, October 7, 2012 The Science Behind Kimchi
My attempts at making homemade kimchi have led to an interesting question: how long can it be aged, and why?

The origin of fermented food was dependent upon a few key factors: nutritional value and shelf life.  Kimchi itself is from Korea and Japan and comes in hundreds of styles.  It is categorized in several ways, of which there are a few important designations: base produce (ie. cabbage, radish, cucumber), season (ie. winter kimchi, summer kimchi) and region (ie. northern Korea, southern Korea).

To maximize the value and flavor of kimchi it is necessary to understand some of the contributing factors that determine how kimchi is preserved and at what point it becomes inedible.  Within a batch of kimchi, a unique environment is created based on the acidity, pH level, sodium level and temperature.  This environment creates a very restrictive ecosystem, which is preferred by Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). In the case of kimchi the primary bacteria family is Lactobacilius, a bacteria already present in the human digestive system.  A single batch of kimchi may have hundreds of different strains of LAB, each contributing certain characteristics to their environment, but most importantly producing lactic acid, which is the main preservation agent.

(http://www.humanecologyreview.org/pastissues/her151/scottandsullivan.pdf)


So what happens when kimchi is made?  Each of the unique ingredients which make up kimchi have important roles: salt regulates the speed of fermentation, sugar and starch provide the food for the bacteria to consume, the base produce provides the body of the kimchi, the ginger and garlic provide nutrition and antibacterial qualities that regulate the freshness and fermentation of the mix.  Each of these also carries their own set of ambient yeasts and bacteria.

The warmer the storage temperature, the faster the metabolism of the bacteria and the faster the fermentation takes place.  The best results are achieved when the bacteria begins to ferment the kimchi quickly, but are then transferred to conditions that allow for the slowest ripening.  This allows less time for other, less desirable bacteria, to affect the quality and flavor of the kimchi.  There have been studies on using sherry yeast or a starter from previous batch of cold fermented kimchi (41*F) to jump start fermentation, much like a sourdough bread starter.

The initial fermentation of kimchi takes place between hetero LAB strains.  These strains of bacteria primarily produce organic acids and carbon dioxide as byproducts.  After the first fermentation, the flavor profile is at its peak, with a target pH level of 4.2-4.5 and an acidity level of 0.6-0.8% (http://cms.daegu.ac.kr/sgpark/microbiology/김치발효젖산균.pdf).  To maximize shelf life, the goal is to quickly bring the kimchi through this first fermentation and maintain the pH and acidity levels by monitoring temperature and having the right balance of salt and antiseptic/ antibacterial ingredients (ginger, garlic and optional green tea).

As kimchi ages, the pH slowly drops and the acidity level rises, this change happens quickly when the kimchi reaches its second fermentation between homo LAB strains.  These strains of bacteria produce excessive amounts of lactic acid.  This fermentation brings the kimchi out of the desired pH and acidity levels and closer to inedible acidity levels, introducing less desirable flavor profiles.  So, ideally kimchi goes quickly through its first fermentation and is then introduced to an environment that delays the secondary fermentation as long as possible.

If prepared and stored properly, a batch of kimchi may remain edible for as many as 3 years, although at this point it is well beyond the target flavor profile, pH and acidity levels.  All that’s left to do is make a hot and sour kimchi soup.  Let's take a quick look at the perfect environment for a batch of extended shelf-life kimchi.

First we need a very even and accurate level of sodium to initially dehydrate the base produce.  Applying granulated salt by hand tends to be less accurate, so a different technique serves very well.  A 15% saltwater brine (a ratio of 1:5 salt to water) provides even distribution and an accurate level of salt.  A batch of kimchi begins with a 6-hour brine.

After the ingredients have been put together and the kimchi is put in jars, preferably with a starter from a previous batch of cold fermented kimchi (41*F), the kimchi needs to spend less than 18hours in a cool (60*F), dark place and then be moved to the refrigerator.  This will allow the slow fermenting hetero LAB strains to get a head start without over acidifying the kimchi and then move into a cold environment that will allow the fermentation process to slow down and delay the second fermentation.


This is what you need to make Kimchi:
Equipment:
3 Large mixing bowls
Rubber Gloves
2 two-quart jars


Ingredients:
Raw Ingredients:
2 Napa Cabbages
1 Korean Radish
¼ c. Green Onion
Brine:
                        5 c. Salt
30 c. Water
Kimchi Paste:
1 c. Sweet Rice Flour (Tobiko)
3 c. Water
½ c. Sugar
1 tbs. Fish Sauce (I'll make this myself sometime soon)
1-3 c. Red Pepper Powder (grind yourself if you're up to it)
1 Large Onion
1 c. Garlic
3 tbsp. Ginger
Optional Additions:
1 c. Raw Oysters
1 c. Dried Shrimp
1 tbsp. Matcha green tea powder


First, create a 15% (1:5) salt-water brine by combining your salt and water and stir until completely dissolved.  Halve your napa cabbage through the heart and chop your radish into 1" cubes and rinse, retaining 1/5 of uncubed radish for the paste.  Separate the cabbage and radish into separate bowls.  Pour enough brine over the cabbage and radish to cover and let them sit for 6 hours, stirring once.  When this is complete, rinse the radish and cabbage thoroughly between each leaf at least 3 times and strain to dry.

Meanwhile, begin your kimchi paste: add your sweet rice flour and water to a small saucepan until fully dissolved.  Add the sugar and stir until the mixture just begins to bubble.  Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl.

In a food processor, combine garlic, ginger and onion and process into a paste.  Add to flour mixture with fish sauce, red pepper powder, green tea powder, chopped green onions and the rest of the julienned radish.

At this point you may add your optional seafood.
Mix the kimchi paste ingredients together and you are ready to start putting your kimchi together.  It is advisable to use some gloves for this step.  With your hands, apply the kimchi paste in between each of the leaves of the cabbage and on the outside.  Squeeze out any excess paste and you are ready to bottle your cabbage kimchi.  Add the radish to the remainder of the paste, stir and this is ready to bottle as well."
Posted by Drew at 8:27 PM   
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on May 23, 2013, 12:59:41 AM
Yowbarb Note: In this paragraph on the health benefits of kimchi the author lists many benefits and one possible detrimental effect of Kim chi.
I feel in a survival setting these types of foods such as some premade kimchi will be valuable. Note the list of pathogens it helps to combat. These are the sorts of things people would run into if the grid fails, especially at first, food storage not as good and at times very unhygienic conditions...Foods with the salt, chilies and garlic, ginger etc. do kill many germs.
...

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2013/03/shou-chings-moms-kimchi/

Health Benefits of Kimchi

But before we share the recipe, a few reasons to make kimchi. Kimchi has been reported to:
•Reduce body weight and blood pressure in the overweight and obese. [1]
•Inhibit autoimmune diseases such as atopic dermatitis [2]
•Inhibit development of allergy. [3]
•Have anticancer effects. [4]
•Inhibit development of atherosclerosis. [5]
•Have antimicrobial effects on some of the most common gut pathogens, including Listeria, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Vibrio, and Enterobacter. [6]

Against those benefits, kimchi consumption has been associated with higher rates of stomach cancer [7], perhaps due to its high content of salt [8] or N-nitroso compounds [9].
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: enlightenme on May 23, 2013, 04:40:48 AM
Good one Barb!  Thanks!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on May 24, 2013, 11:55:56 AM
Good one Barb!  Thanks!

 :)
I hope to stock up on the Kim Chi...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on June 04, 2013, 08:31:19 AM
The Stevia plant makes a nice safe and healthy substitute for sugar, and this article tells you how to grow your own.  Courtesy of Common Sense Homesteading.  A wonderful website, I subscribe to it on Facebook.  She has lots of good information we all could use.
I hope this link will work for everyone.

http://www.commonsensehome.com/stevia-grow-your-own-sweetener/

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Endtimesgal_2012 on June 04, 2013, 08:36:08 AM
Here is a link to an article on how to make your own brown maple sugar from white sugar.  Again courtesy of the blog, "Barefeet in the kitchen."


http://barefeetinthekitchen.blogspot.com/2013/06/how-to-make-your-own-brown-sugar.html
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2013, 06:39:33 PM
The Stevia plant makes a nice safe and healthy substitute for sugar, and this article tells you how to grow your own.  Courtesy of Common Sense Homesteading.  A wonderful website, I subscribe to it on Facebook.  She has lots of good information we all could use.
I hope this link will work for everyone.

http://www.commonsensehome.com/stevia-grow-your-own-sweetener/

Thanks, Endtimesgal!
I think I will subscribe to her page also.  :)
I like Stevia...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2014, 03:44:16 PM
Yowbarb Note: If you don't eat pork substitute a beef bone or whatever...It calls for sausage, turkey or beef could be used...
This is a nice idea Tom Clinton cooked it up for homeless people; it feeds 150.
...
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=11574   

Red Beans & Rice for 150

Started By Tom Chilton, Apr 12 2008 11:01 AM

I made this for the St. Vincent de Paul Saturday morning homeless/low income people - had comments like "only people from the South can cook like that" and "I'm from Louisiana and that's some good beans and rice." Add some bread and salad, and t's a relatively cheap way to feed a crowd. I made them not very spicy and served with hot sauce. The spicy sausage from Sam's club adds a kick even with no added cayenne.

 2 pork butts, bone in
 BBQ rub
 3 lbs. smoked sausage, diced (more would be better)
 3 lbs. spicy smoked sausage, diced
 15 lbs. onions, chopped
 5 bunches celery, chopped
 16 green bell peppers, chopped
 12 lbs. small red beans, soaked overnight
 4 gallons water
 4 heads of garlic, minced
 salt
 pepper
 10 bay leaves
 4 TBS dried thyme leaves
 4 TBS. dried oregano leaves
 4 TBS paprika
 2 TBS ground white pepper
 1 #10 can tomato sauce
 1 pint Worchestire sauce
 1/2 cup hot sauce - Crystal (optional)


 Rub the butts (or just use salt and pepper) and BBQ until at pulled pork stage. Let cool slightly, pull meat off bones and chop meat so it's not stringy. Refrigerate meat and bones. (This can be done several days ahead of time).

 Do all your mise en place - chop veggies for the trinity (onion, bell pepper, celery), mince garlic, dice sausage, etc. Drain the beans. Heat over high heat 15 gallon cast iron jambalaya pot and brown sausage. (about 10 minutes) Add 1/2 of the trinity, 2 TBS. of salt and 2 TBS of pepper and cook until it's softened (about 10-15 minutes). Add the beans and cook for 5 minutes. Add the water, other 1/2 of the trinity, garlic, bay leaves, thyme, oregano, paprika, 2 TBS more salt and 2 TBS white pepper, and the bones from the pork butts. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 2 1/2 hours until beans are tender. Add more water if necessary as they cook.

 After beans are tender, add tomato sauce, pork butt meat, worchestire sauce, hot sauce (if using). Check seasonings and adjust to taste. Simmer for 1/2 hour. If they're watery, turn up the heat to reduce. Take a big bowl or two of the beans out of the pot and mash with a potato masher and return to pot. When they're the consistency you want (they should not be watery), remove and discard pork butt bones and bay leaves (if you can find them), then remove from pot to 4" deep hotel pans and then serve with rice. Serve hot sauce on the side.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2014, 04:09:33 PM
Yowbarb Note: I haven't totally checked this out...I don't know if some of this stuff is  GM or not. Neil Agrivive·seems to know what he's talking about...posting this.
...
VIDEO:
Buy Wholesale Bulk Organic Dried Navy Beans, Small Red Beans, Pinto Beans, Black Beans, Soybeans   3:03   15 views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/kZQPBkVDdr8

Published on Dec 8, 2013
Neil Agrivive·186 videos 
http://www.AGRIVIVE.com
Buy Wholesale Bulk Organic Dried Navy Beans, Small Red Beans, Pinto Beans, Black Beans, Soybeans
 

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2014, 10:45:11 AM
Yowbarb Note:  Samboosak Mil-Tawa (Chick pea dumplings)

•   I could post this in the Topic, Various kosher recipes for breads and other foods - since I was already posting Recipes by Rachel (Jewish Iraqi cooking, very eclectic...)
•   However I can see this type of food being very economical, and done in bulk quantities for a survival group.
•   I can picture 2-3 people working together to make up a huge batch of these  - chick pea dumplings -
•   using bulk stored foods, oils and spices – also –
•   onions from the garden and eggs from the chickens on the site.
•   The kinds of ingredients a lot of people would have in their storeroom.
•   Some of the spices, (make a list) you may not normally keep around.
•   This type of food is commonly used all over India, Africa the Middle East –
•   and has its place in Jewish cooking as well.
•   I have tasted foods made of chickpeas etc. and they are usually delicious. This starts out with whole dried chickpeas.

(http://www.frugallivingnw.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/IMG_5301_2613_edited-2_opt.jpg)

Yowbarb Note, continued: My next post will have some Notes and special instructions from Rachel Somekh, important to read. One Note here:
"An Arabic term that will recur in this section, as well as in many of the main
courses, is 'hashwa.'  'Hashwa' means 'filling' or 'stuffing,' and it is used to describe
the inner contents of any stuffed or filled dish, from chicken to dumplings."
...

http://recipesbyrachel.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/6.recipesbyrachel.borrowedclassics.pdf

1. Samboosak Mil-Tawa (Chick pea dumplings)

This is an Iraqi cousin of the Indian samosa and of the sambosa of various countries,including Ethiopia and Afghanistan. The filling and spicing, however, is unique to the Iraqi variant.

Hashwa (Filling):

1/2 lbs. dry chickpeas, washed and soaked overnight in a pot
2 small onions (or 1 1/2 medium), finely chopped
3 large eggs
1-2 tablespoons corn or canola oil
1 flat teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2  teaspoon cayenne
1 heaping tablespoon freshly ground cumin

Boil chickpeas in the same water in which they were soaking overnight. Water should be 1 inch higher than chickpeas. Boil until al dente – they should not be too soft. Spill out water and leave in pot until cooler (about 15 minutes). Chop in food processor until chopped into fine pieces – not a paste. Remove from food processor and set aside.
Place onions, oil, pepper, and cayenne in a large frying pan and sauté on medium flame until onions are golden brown. Beat eggs in a bowl and add a dash of pepper. Push onions to side of pan and add eggs, scrambling vigorously as eggs begin to set. When eggs harden, mix with onions; eggs should be scrambled into very small pieces. Lower flame to medium-low and gradually add chickpeas, folding into egg-onion mixture until all chickpeas added. Add salt, mix, and shut off flame. Let cool for about 1/2 hour and add cumin, folding in the cumin until evenly distributed. When finished, mixture should give off a fragrance of cumin. (If not, then cumin is weak and you should add a little more.) If not ready to make dough and fill, then refrigerate. (If refrigerating overnight, then transfer mixture to bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate.)

Dough:

2 cups white, all-purpose flour (yeast free)
2-3 teaspoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons corn or sesame oil (in Iraq, sesame used)
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup water

Put flour in a large bowl. Add all other ingredients, with water being the last added.
Knead until smooth (about 5 minutes). Consistency should be not too hard and not too soft. If it is too hard, add a drop of water; if too soft, add flour. Let dough rest for about 15 minutes in the same bowl, making sure to cover bowl with light towel (so as to prevent drying of dough).

Preparation, Filling, and Frying:

Small rolling pin
Smooth surface for working dough
2 cups corn oil
Tear dough into pieces and, using considerable pressure, kneed pieces into balls about 1 inch in diameter, roughly the size of an acorn (much smaller than a walnut, larger than a hazelnut). Coat smooth work surface and rolling pin with corn oil and flatten 10 of the round balls, one after another, into circles that are roughly 2 inches in diameter. Stack them in order of work. After flattening all 10, go back through the same 10 in the same
order (beginning with the first one on which you worked) and flatten them further into a 4-inch diameter circle (they should be as close to perfect circles as possible). In this second go around, do not apply too much pressure in the center of the circle; instead work the extremities more than the center to expand the circle. (This delicate process
requires a small, light rolling pin.)

After further flattening all 10, go back through the same 10 in the same order and fill in this manner:

Put 1 heaping teaspoon of hashwa in the middle of the dough circle and fold dough over into a perfect semi-circle, crimping the edges all the way around the circumference (not the diameter) of the semi-circle.
Lay the completed samboosak in a plate glazed with corn oil and repeat with the next one. After filling all 10, repeat process with another 10 dough balls. Do this until all the dough or all the hashwa is finished.

Put 1 cup corn oil into a deep frying pan and set on medium flame.
When oil is very hot, drop as many samboosak into pan as will fit (do not stack). Fry samboosak until brown, turning them as many times as required so that both sides are fried evenly. Remove to paper towel-lined plate. Repeat until all samboosak are fried. If oil gets low, add more. Remove to serving dish and serve.

If not ready to serve, let samboosak completely cool, then place in ziplock bag and freeze. These may not be frozen before frying. When ready to serve, defrost and reheat in oven or toaster oven. (Samboosak best when served immediately after frying.)
Yield: 35-40 Samboosak
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2014, 10:51:46 AM
Notes from
Rachel Somekh  http://recipesbyrachel.com/recipes/

repicesbyrachel.com  http://recipesbyrachel.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/2.recipesbyrachel.friedappetizers.pdf
 
2. FRIED APPETIZERS:
"Among the many wonderful features of Iraqi cuisine are its delectable fried appetizers,each different from the other and all bursting with flavor. A typical Iraqi meal will usually begin with several different types of these delicious tidbits, and one must exercise great discipline in order to save room for the main course!
None of these dishes is easy to make, but the result is well worth the effort. Most of these can be made in large quantities and then frozen and kept for considerable periods of time. The quantities given below allow for this, thereby rendering the work more efficient. Of course, these quantities can be proportionally reduced if the cook does not wish to store the items. One important thing to remember is that these dishes can only be frozen at particular stages of their preparation, and the stage is different for each dish. If you wish to freeze them,
make sure to do so at the appropriate point as set forth within each recipe.
An Arabic term that will recur in this section, as well as in many of the main courses, is 'hashwa, 'Hashwa' means 'filling' or 'stuffing,' and it is used to describe the inner contents of any stuffed or filled dish, from chicken to dumplings."
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2014, 01:01:34 PM
Simple little dumplings - quickly cooked over fires - can be filled with whatever is on hand.
They would be filling and cheap and be a good complement to soups, canned or homemade.
Some people use lamp or beef, ground. Some will prefer just the chickpeas etc.
Samousek is about the same as samboosak, samosas and sambosas, - tempura, and Native American Fry breads. Universal foods.
As long as a group has a stock of bulk oils, dried things like beans and chickpeas; flour and spices tghere will always be something to eat. Tahini and various sauces would be good to have on hand too.
- Yowbarb

http://atelierchristine.com/archives/6058/recipe/sambousek-ouzi-deep-fried-savory-hand-pies
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2014, 04:08:29 PM
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: ilinda on March 18, 2014, 04:49:21 PM
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2014, 05:31:35 PM
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.

Hi that method of using the knife sounds familiar.
The only thing I did was pick the prickly pears and manually pick the spines and eat them. I was about 13 at the time on a summer trip. No one showed me how to do it but I really wanted to eat them...
Previously I have posted complete instructions on how to prepare them in many ways. I will try to find that link. I'm just trying to get the info out there that they are free and a survival food.
Back soon with the link.  :)
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2014, 07:02:50 PM
http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Just wondering, Barb, if you've ever tried to work with this cactus?  There are large spines, and then there are those tiny, almost-inpossible-to-see very fine spines, more like hairs, that are every bit as bad as the large spines.  Maybe they are worse, as you can easily id. the large spines.
It said to scrape a knife at 90 deg. across the entire pad.  Have you done this?  I might try, as they are nutritious and free.

So here is the link: Cactus, Yucca etc. as sources of food
Board: Scavenging  / Name of Topic: Cactus, Yucca etc. as sources of food

Note: I thought I had more instructions there...maybe they are posted elsewhere. I will post more preparation info there, too.
•   First is a video in Spanish made in Mexico. como limpiar los nopales   1:47 
•   (Yowbarb translation is, How to clean nopales)
•   You can view  and follow the method she uses.
•   I think this makes more sense than some other methods I have seen or heard about on the net.
•   Below that one is a video in English by a Mexican American woman - Eloise Lozano.
•   So scroll down for that one too, How To Peel And Cook Fresh Nopales/cactus  9:36
•   Only posting some illustrations from the first video for now...
- Yowbarb
...
como limpiar los nopales   1:47   
Link:
http://youtu.be/ATB3LR0fSNU

Angy Flores
...
How To Peel And Cook Fresh Nopales/cactus   9:36 

Link: http://youtu.be/A9Ufyv7pliY
Eloise Lozano
Published on Aug 27, 2013 
In this video i will be showing you how to peel and cook fresh nopales/cactus
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2014, 07:55:27 PM
Yowbarb Note: I didn't finish my post from earlier - ways to preserve the nopales...
The reason I am posting the picked okra recipe is it is referred to in the article. This is a recipe Mr. Homegrown has successfully used to prepare the nopales (prickly pear pads.)

http://www.rootsimple.com/2012/06/four-ways-to-preserve-prickly-pear-pads-nopales/

Four Ways To Preserve Prickly Pear Pads - Nopales by Mr. Homegrown
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2014, 08:17:28 PM
http://www.rootsimple.com/2010/08/low-sugar-prickly-pear-jelly-recipe/
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: ilinda on March 19, 2014, 06:43:31 AM
Now I have a MUCH better idea of how to process the cactus.  We have a smaller version here in Missouri's Ozarks, and it is also called Prickley Pear Cactus.  After removing the thorns I'm thinking of just sun drying them just as I have done with okra.  It seems the slime factor is about the same, but after drying, not as bad.
Thanks so much for all the posts/links about cactus processing, Barb.  Excellent info., as these cacti are here and there and will be there when you need them.  They seem so hardy, much more than things we plant.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 19, 2014, 11:29:22 AM
Now I have a MUCH better idea of how to process the cactus.  We have a smaller version here in Missouri's Ozarks, and it is also called Prickley Pear Cactus.  After removing the thorns I'm thinking of just sun drying them just as I have done with okra.  It seems the slime factor is about the same, but after drying, not as bad.
Thanks so much for all the posts/links about cactus processing, Barb.  Excellent info., as these cacti are here and there and will be there when you need them.  They seem so hardy, much more than things we plant.
ilinda, I'm glad if the post and the videos helped.  :)
It actually is pretty amazing these plants. They grow in arid climates with no cultivation or extra help, apparently. They are loaded with nutrition.
Although I personally have not got into preparing them (aside from my one time with the fruit) I'm willing to try it. That recipe from Mr. Homegrown a couple posts back seems about as easy as anything. He dried them after soaking them in teriyaki because that way they have a jerky flavor.
The cactus, along with anything growing on the ground could be destroyed by salt water flooding, fire, etc. but I think it would be a good idea to have some in big planter pots or boxed and keep them at a survival location. My general plan is to have a container of some kind with live plants.
Shipping container, partly buried for stability and/or a concrete box set into the ground with a lid.
If conditions worsen, the plants and trees and herbs could be wheel barrowed into there and Oh yes, seeds and gardening implements too.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on April 18, 2014, 05:07:55 PM
For now, just going to post this Business Insider article on depression Era recipes. Will post up each recipe with images, at some point in time.
- Yowbarb
...
http://www.businessinsider.com/depression-era-recipes-2011-11?op=1
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 11, 2014, 01:06:55 PM
Yowbarb's food thought of the day - chia seeds - either alone or mixed with other ingredients as a highly nutritious and energy - producing snack.
I first read about chia seeds back in the early 1970s. Read that the Native Americans used to chew them slowly while on long treks. For whatever reason, chia just popped into my mind again. It's been a really long time since I bought any. I consider these a good survival food to keep around and put in a bugout bag, vehicle, etc. So I just googled chia for a current article... This article has three innovative concoctions of trail mixes. Posting the one with chia seeds.
...http://laurenconrad.com/blog/2014/03/snack-attack-3-healthy-trail-mix-recipes/

Midnight Snack Trail Mix

“Since you don’t want your blood sugar to spike right before bed, I’d recommend going for a slower-release carb like popcorn, with coconut oil and chia seeds,” says Shira. Chia seeds are loaded with complexion-enhancing omega fatty acids, which help us achieve that dewy skin. I would recommend buying popcorn kernels and popping them over the stove with the rosemary, orange zest and Himalayan salt in the pan. This will give the popcorn the flavors and make the rosemary and orange zest easier to eat. Then, use about a tablespoon of coconut oil to mix everything together.
●Popcorn
●Coconut oil
●Orange peel zest
●Chia seeds
●Rosemary
●Pink Himalayan salt

These three trail mixes are healthy snack choices for any time of the day. Just think about how much better you will feel after eating one of these energizing mixes than soda, chips, or candy!

What healthy ingredient will you add to your trail mix?

XO Lauren

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: steedy on July 11, 2014, 01:48:14 PM
I think chia seeds can get pretty slimy in your mouth.
Title: chia seeds
Post by: SocratesR on July 11, 2014, 03:09:46 PM
Link to info on chia seeds and other superfoods: http://b2012overleven.runboard.com/t409

Traditionally drunk in water with sugar and lime.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 18, 2014, 07:25:48 AM
I think chia seeds can get pretty slimy in your mouth.

They do have a gelatinous texture. Although I ahve read Native Americans took the seeds and kept them in their mouths on long treks, the current info I am seeing is to soak them, and then mix with foods and beverages. I personally have chewed them...no adverse affects that I know of...An energy boost.
.......................................................................

http://www.versagrain.com/chia-seeds.html  How to Use and Eat Chia Seed

The fact that they are tiny but packed with nutritional value and virtually tasteless, makes these seeds an easy and healthy addition to soups, breads, smoothies, and yogurt. Soak them to form a jell (absorbing 12 times their weight in water) that can be mixed into fruit juices, smoothies, and yogurt. They can also act as a binder in flat breads to reduce or eliminate the need for lard or oil. Explore the possibilities.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: steedy on July 18, 2014, 08:04:05 AM
I've had them too, which is how I know they get slimy in your mouth.  They do provide energy throughout the day.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 18, 2014, 02:34:35 PM
I've had them too, which is how I know they get slimy in your mouth.  They do provide energy throughout the day.

 ;)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: ilinda on March 03, 2015, 04:53:44 PM
This wild food needs no recipe actually.  It is wintercress and is a broccoli relative.  I try to locate the various plants in late fall or any time in winter so that when it snows I will know exactly where some are.  This came in handy this year. 

Now that snow is here and not going away for a while I decided to rake away the snow and find one.  Sure enough there it is, under snow and ice, still green and ready to harvest.  It would not take too many leaves to make a salad.  I suppose some people will steam it, but I eat it raw, on the go, or in a salad.

Note that snow, ice, and cold temperatures do not bother it.  Now THAT is a survival food.  It will start to get bitter in the spring and then send up a stalk with flowers, then seeds.  Harvest while weather is cold.

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 29, 2016, 10:30:50 PM
http://www.buzzfeed.com/adambianchi/these-tater-tots-are-made-of-broccoli-and-theyre-amazing-as#.ht4ZQbm4KL

These “Tater Tots” Are Made Of Broccoli And They’re Amazing As Life
Tot it up!

Broccoli Tots 

video link: https://youtu.be/PG0GVNN-rm4

Tasty posted on Mar. 19, 2016, at 5:44 p.m.
Published on Mar 19, 2016

INGREDIENTS

12 ounces broccoli, cut into small florets
 ¼ cup scallions, thinly sliced
 2 large garlic cloves, finely diced
 ⅔ cup shredded cheddar cheese
 1 egg, beaten
 ⅔ cup bread crumbs
 Salt & pepper
 Optional: 2 tsp Sriracha (optional but recommended!)

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring to a boil. Aggressively season with salt. Blanch the broccoli in boiling water for about two minutes. Drain and finely chop the cooked broccoli. In a mixing bowl, add broccoli, scallions, garlic, cheddar, egg, and bread crumbs. Optional: Add hot sauce of choice. Mix well and chill in the refrigerator for 15–20 minutes.

Spray a nonstick baking sheet with nonstick spray. Shape the mixture into tot shapes and spread them evenly on the sheet.

Bake for 8–9 minutes. Flip and then bake for an additional 8–9 minutes on the other side until golden brown
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2017, 12:04:47 AM
Yowbarb Note: Dried Salt Fish keeps a long, long time. If your survival location is near a river, spend some time fishing and salt and dry the fish.  ;D If tshtf the water could become polluted, so may as well lay in a store of dried fish and of course, plenty of water.
...
Excerpts from article, DIY: Dried Salt Fish

Summer is a great time to make your own dried salt fish. (You can do it in cold weather too, as long as you have good strong sun.) If you live in a dry climate so much the better, but we made our own here in Penang, where humidity levels regularly hover above seventy per cent.
To make salt fish it's best to have, or construct, some sort of hanging apparatus outside where it catches sunlight. (You can also lay your fish on a rattan mat or other material, but the more of the fish that's exposed to air and sun all at once, the more evenly they'll dry and the quicker the whole process will go.) We stuck a broomstick in a hole in the wall that surrounds our property and suspended our skewered salted fish from it with plastic twine.
Preferably you will time this project to start the fish drying early in the morning. Note that they need to wallow in salt in the fridge overnight or up to 24 hours before you hang them outside to dry.

Here's the process:

1.   Procure some fish. Any fish will do, really. Oily fish like sardines, anchovies, mackerel, smelt, ocean trout and salmon will result in the strongest flavor. If you're a salt fish newbie you might want to give it a go with a milder fish: trout, sea bass, john dory, flounder, halibut, cod etc.
2.   Clean your fish well. If the fish are small (the ones in the photo above were about 6 inches long) you can leave them whole -- just cut off the head and, if you like, fins and tail. If you're using fillets slice them into manageable pieces. A slab of salmon, for instance, I might slice into 6 by 2-inch strips. Remove as many bones as you can, but if you plan to deep-fry the little buggers the bones will become crispy enough to eat.
3.   Dry the fish, and then rub them with plenty of good quality salt -- sea salt, kosher salt, whatever. I'm convinced that the problem with alot of commercial dry salt fish is the salt that's used by the maker -- nasty heavily iodized salt makes for nasty salt fish. Put the fish in a bowl or a ceramic baking dish, cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge -- or a very cool, dark place) overnight or for up to 24 hours.
4.   Remove the fish and rinse them well to get rid of the salt, and pat them dry. Skewer the fish in a way that exposes as much surface area as possible to air and sun. For instance, if you're drying whole fish, pull the sides of the fish apart so that the gut area opens up (see photo).
5.   Hang the fish in the sun. If you're concerned about flies and other insects (strangely, despite Penang's humid heat not a single insect bothered our fish when they were hanging outside) drape your fish with cheesecloth. You may want to adjust the position of the fish throughout the day, turning them front to back or whatnot, to get even sun exposure.
6.   Bring the fish inside at the end of the day and give it a gentle squeeze. You're not looking for cardboard, but the fish should be relatively dry. If any moisture comes to your fingers they're not done -- place them, covered, back in the fridge overnight (or in a very cool, dark place) and repeat the drying process the next day. Two days should do it.
7.   Use the fish right away, or store in the fridge.
Think about variations that bring dried seasonings into play -- you might rub your fish with chili flakes before hanging it out to dry, or with lemon zest or zatar.
 
Update 28 August 2012: See comments below for links to photos taken by Lynn Cook, an EA reader in Australia, who tried our recipe with excellent results!
http://eatingasia.typepad.com/eatingasia/2012/07/diy-dried-salt-fish.html
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2017, 12:08:06 AM
This wild food needs no recipe actually.  It is wintercress and is a broccoli relative.  I try to locate the various plants in late fall or any time in winter so that when it snows I will know exactly where some are.  This came in handy this year. 

Now that snow is here and not going away for a while I decided to rake away the snow and find one.  Sure enough there it is, under snow and ice, still green and ready to harvest.  It would not take too many leaves to make a salad.  I suppose some people will steam it, but I eat it raw, on the go, or in a salad.

Note that snow, ice, and cold temperatures do not bother it.  Now THAT is a survival food.  It will start to get bitter in the spring and then send up a stalk with flowers, then seeds.  Harvest while weather is cold.
ilinda, that is great info. The sturdy dark green plants like that are so life-giving. A true survival food.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: ilinda on February 26, 2017, 03:34:19 PM
Yowbarb Note: Dried Salt Fish keeps a long, long time. If your survival location is near a river, spend some time fishing and salt and dry the fish.  ;D If tshtf the water could become polluted, so may as well lay in a store of dried fish and of course, plenty of water.
...
Excerpts from article, DIY: Dried Salt Fish

Summer is a great time to make your own dried salt fish. (You can do it in cold weather too, as long as you have good strong sun.) If you live in a dry climate so much the better, but we made our own here in Penang, where humidity levels regularly hover above seventy per cent.
To make salt fish it's best to have, or construct, some sort of hanging apparatus outside where it catches sunlight. (You can also lay your fish on a rattan mat or other material, but the more of the fish that's exposed to air and sun all at once, the more evenly they'll dry and the quicker the whole process will go.) We stuck a broomstick in a hole in the wall that surrounds our property and suspended our skewered salted fish from it with plastic twine.
Preferably you will time this project to start the fish drying early in the morning. Note that they need to wallow in salt in the fridge overnight or up to 24 hours before you hang them outside to dry.

Here's the process:

1.   Procure some fish. Any fish will do, really. Oily fish like sardines, anchovies, mackerel, smelt, ocean trout and salmon will result in the strongest flavor. If you're a salt fish newbie you might want to give it a go with a milder fish: trout, sea bass, john dory, flounder, halibut, cod etc.
2.   Clean your fish well. If the fish are small (the ones in the photo above were about 6 inches long) you can leave them whole -- just cut off the head and, if you like, fins and tail. If you're using fillets slice them into manageable pieces. A slab of salmon, for instance, I might slice into 6 by 2-inch strips. Remove as many bones as you can, but if you plan to deep-fry the little buggers the bones will become crispy enough to eat.
3.   Dry the fish, and then rub them with plenty of good quality salt -- sea salt, kosher salt, whatever. I'm convinced that the problem with alot of commercial dry salt fish is the salt that's used by the maker -- nasty heavily iodized salt makes for nasty salt fish. Put the fish in a bowl or a ceramic baking dish, cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge -- or a very cool, dark place) overnight or for up to 24 hours.
4.   Remove the fish and rinse them well to get rid of the salt, and pat them dry. Skewer the fish in a way that exposes as much surface area as possible to air and sun. For instance, if you're drying whole fish, pull the sides of the fish apart so that the gut area opens up (see photo).
5.   Hang the fish in the sun. If you're concerned about flies and other insects (strangely, despite Penang's humid heat not a single insect bothered our fish when they were hanging outside) drape your fish with cheesecloth. You may want to adjust the position of the fish throughout the day, turning them front to back or whatnot, to get even sun exposure.
6.   Bring the fish inside at the end of the day and give it a gentle squeeze. You're not looking for cardboard, but the fish should be relatively dry. If any moisture comes to your fingers they're not done -- place them, covered, back in the fridge overnight (or in a very cool, dark place) and repeat the drying process the next day. Two days should do it.
7.   Use the fish right away, or store in the fridge.
Think about variations that bring dried seasonings into play -- you might rub your fish with chili flakes before hanging it out to dry, or with lemon zest or zatar.
 
Update 28 August 2012: See comments below for links to photos taken by Lynn Cook, an EA reader in Australia, who tried our recipe with excellent results!
http://eatingasia.typepad.com/eatingasia/2012/07/diy-dried-salt-fish.html
This is exactly what I've been looking for, especially ever since I had a "dream" that said something like, "you need to find a place in here to dry fish".  Besides the obvious lesson of learning how to dry fish, I think I also learned that "water levels will be way up".

Thanks so much for posting, Barb, as none of the sites I read were exactly what I was looking for.  I knew I had seen pics somewhere of the "olden days" when people would hang out salted fish to dry in the sun. 
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2017, 06:23:30 PM
ilinda, that is so interesting, that you had a dream about finding a place to dry fish. I am glad if the recipe helps you. I need to memorize it and take it with me when I relocate..
Honestly I didn't give it a thought but something about Ekratz's post led me to the idea. Her area is near several waterways. As long as a person is near water they may as well spend part of their time fishing and drying the fish!

My idea is, if people have gone to their survival areas and have some time on their hands, they can fish, dry lots of fish, package it up good, keep it dry and use it as a survival resource. i saw a few recipes, so the salted fish can be reconstituted in soups, mixed with mashed potatoes to make fish cakes to fry, mixed with rice. Rice, flour, dried potatoes, dried vegetables are cheap staples so add to that a good supply of dried salted fish and you have something. :)

Sadly, it is possible some waterways or oceans or lakes might be polluted from various causes, during the passing of PX. So having a stash of fish would be good.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 26, 2017, 06:27:22 PM
I don't particularly enjoy the idea of fishing, hunting, slaughtering animals, etc. but I (would) be willing to do a lot of fishing and salting and fish drying if it meant my family in the future would have something to fall back on... Come to think of it, in a survival group that is one thing an old timer man or woman could do to contribute: Go fishing. :)
Staples:
Again, seems like a good idea to make sure one has lots of flour, oil, lots and lots of salt, dried potatoes, fishing gear, etc.
 
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: ilinda on February 27, 2017, 01:25:56 PM
Like you, Yowbarb, I'm not a fisherperson.  However after my dream I realized two things:  1) I will probably have to learn to fish, and need to store/preserve that fish as the water will probably all come at once and then soon the waters may recede; and 2) many recent dreams tell me of the massive flooding,  including in my vicinity, and I have had one particular dream about my area being a drainage to the Mississippi River! 

Yes, it's true about the pollution of the waters, as well as aquatic life, but in an emergency, people tend to eat to survive, even if they think there might be mercury in the fish, etc.

In fact, just this morning I was reading in Mike Adam's book, Food Forensics that 90% of the mercury contamination in food is carried out of the body, if strawberries are eaten in the same time period, as strawberries are an excellent heavy metal chelator, especially if the toxic metal is in the digestive tract.  So now I suppose we'd better be drying strawberries as well!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 04, 2017, 03:31:52 PM

....Yes, it's true about the pollution of the waters, as well as aquatic life, but in an emergency, people tend to eat to survive, even if they think there might be mercury in the fish, etc.

In fact, just this morning I was reading in Mike Adam's book, Food Forensics that 90% of the mercury contamination in food is carried out of the body, if strawberries are eaten in the same time period, as strawberries are an excellent heavy metal chelator, especially if the toxic metal is in the digestive tract.  So now I suppose we'd better be drying strawberries as well!

ilinda, wow that is great info to know about the strawberries!