Author Topic: Chickens  (Read 13340 times)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1011
  • Karma: +15/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2017, 12:41:10 PM »
Hi all,

We began keeping chickens as a home school project years ago when my children were young, and have had a number of years to improve our methods.  Regarding how to feed them in the after-time:
Once it's safe to pasture them again, there may be an abundance of bio-degradation insects, such as beetles, as well as other small creatures for them to eat.  But what to do during the pole-shift confinement period and winter?

1. We intensively studied poultry nutrition and make all our own feed, rather than relying upon the local feed store for factory-made scratch.  However, that means we still have to come up with the raw materials, either from what we grow, what we store, or what we can obtain nearby.  Obtaining in the after-times is the largest unknown, even if we live among farm people.  So the two of three variables that we can control are what we grow and what we store.  What we can grow is likely to take a battering from the incoming debris field that we are beginning to traverse, but we still must try our hardest to do this anyway, because it is one variable that we at least have some control over.  The third variable, what we store, needs to be extended to cover the largest possible stretch of time that we can manage. 

2. We need to get creative about storage space, unless one is fortunate enough to have one or more large barns (which are not guaranteed to remain standing in the after-time).  For example, when I have an old chest freezer die on me, I never discard it, as it is the perfect place to store sacks of raw feed grains away from rodents, insects, moisture, etc.  Metal trash cans with lids are good storage places if they are placed on a wooden plank to prevent wicking moisture from a concrete floor.  Plastic buckets with tight lids, such as the largest kind we use for human storage food, can also store animal feed.  The same oxygen absorbers can be used as for human food storage.  Outdoors, hay can be stored under a deck, etc., especially if it is wrapped in plastic sheeting or contractor-size trash bags and stacked on old asphalt shingles on the ground, or on pallets / skids, with maybe a tarp tied down over the whole thing.

3.  What stores well?  One of the key components of our feed, which is vitamin and mineral impregnated black oil sunflower seed, does Not store well, so more creativity is needed.  Bulk oats in large sacks have a better storage life due to the vitamin E content of oats.    When storing large bulk feed sacks, though, they should be cycled through a working chest freezer for 72 hours to kill insect eggs.  If planning to breed your poultry in the after-times, which is necessary if depending upon them well into the future, then finer feed will be needed for the babies, so either plan to grind your own or store the finer cut instant oats.

Enriched white or parboiled rice stores well, but must be thoroughly re-hydrated before giving to poultry, as undercooked rice may swell in their crops.  Dehydrated potato flakes are an option, as are soaked and sprouted whole grains.  Most corn is now GMO in the U.S., so we don't use it at all. 

Protein: Well-soaked and cooked legumes, their own cooked eggs, a partial left-over can of pet food that can't be refrigerated without electricity, dehydrated milk from storage, earth worms, salamanders, etc.

Grit: small stones on the ground, stored oyster shell for females, stored crushed granite

Calcium: dehydrated milk from storage (you see why there's no such thing as too much dry milk), crushed oyster shell in storage, dehydrated spinach from the garden, sea salt, their own egg shells

Sodium: sea salt, iodized table salt, especially in summer.  A lack of salt, when forgotten in the mash, is the only reason that we have ever lost poultry in the summer months.

Potassium: sea salt, cooked potatoes or potato flakes, white beans, squash

Vitamin D for leg strength: if natural sunlight is not available, then consider the oil from a can of tuna or other sea food mixed into their mash, or their own egg yolks, or fortified dry milk

Vitamin A: dehydrated greens, dehydrated carrots, dehydrated tomatoes, mashed or dried sweet potatoes or squash, their own yolks if they are free-ranged at all.  Some vitamin A is in dried milk.  If forage greens are expected to be wiped out by Px for a while, may want to store rabbit pellets, especially if keeping egg-producing land ducks.  Baby chicks don't process carotenes well, so need a non-vegetable source from the list. 

Natural de-wormer: Geobond, which comes in large sacks, is a blend of diatomaceous earth and French clay.  We mix a fat pinch (using all fingers and thumb of one hand) into the mash once daily and have never had worms in our eggs.

Water: Open bucket method works best in winter, but may be wasteful during the rest of the year if water is scarce.  Other than in wintertime, consider a dripping nipple feeder, at least as a backup for water buckets if things become too rough outdoors to carry water to the flock during the pole shift and traversing the debris field.  Individual hens need to be observed at first to make sure the teat method catches on.  Land ducks need more water changes than hens, as they must have bathing water to clear out their nostrils and moisten their eyes, for which a teat waterer won't work.  Poultry could also be housed in an attached garage or in the cellar during the worst of the passage if sanitation is carefully considered (maybe newspaper or a dropcloth on the floor piled with clean hay, with the litter being bagged for when it is safe to carry and compost outdoors again, as it will be a potential fire hazard).

Iodine (especially in a nuclear winter): a pinch of iodized salt, cranberries, soaked and cooked navy beans, potatoes, a drop of Lugol's in the water trough.

Arginine for egg-producing land ducks (a good type of poultry if you need a quiet flock, and especially quiet males as opposed to roosters): dried milk, forage seeds and nuts (seeds and nuts are not good long-term storage foods though), cooked legumes.

Choline (a B vitamin necessary for healthy nerve transmission and emulsifying fats into the watery blood plasma): their own egg yolks

Phosphorous: Dried milk is the best source, followed by legumes, seeds, nuts.

Trace minerals: sea salt







« Last Edit: March 16, 2017, 02:30:40 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1774
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #31 on: March 16, 2017, 03:50:25 PM »
Hi all,

We began keeping chickens as a home school project years ago when my children were young, and have had a number of years to improve our methods.  Regarding how to feed them in the after-time:
Once it's safe to pasture them again, there may be an abundance of bio-degradation insects, such as beetles, as well as other small creatures for them to eat.  But what to do during the pole-shift confinement period and winter?

1. We intensively studied poultry nutrition and make all our own feed, rather than relying upon the local feed store for factory-made scratch.  However, that means we still have to come up with the raw materials, either from what we grow, what we store, or what we can obtain nearby.  Obtaining in the after-times is the largest unknown, even if we live among farm people.  So the two of three variables that we can control are what we grow and what we store.  What we can grow is likely to take a battering from the incoming debris field that we are beginning to traverse, but we still must try our hardest to do this anyway, because it is one variable that we at least have some control over.  The third variable, what we store, needs to be extended to cover the largest possible stretch of time that we can manage. 

2. We need to get creative about storage space, unless one is fortunate enough to have one or more large barns (which are not guaranteed to remain standing in the after-time).  For example, when I have an old chest freezer die on me, I never discard it, as it is the perfect place to store sacks of raw feed grains away from rodents, insects, moisture, etc.  Metal trash cans with lids are good storage places if they are placed on a wooden plank to prevent wicking moisture from a concrete floor.  Plastic buckets with tight lids, such as the largest kind we use for human storage food, can also store animal feed.  The same oxygen absorbers can be used as for human food storage.  Outdoors, hay can be stored under a deck, etc., especially if it is wrapped in plastic sheeting or contractor-size trash bags and stacked on old asphalt shingles on the ground, or on pallets / skids, with maybe a tarp tied down over the whole thing.

3.  What stores well?  One of the key components of our feed, which is vitamin and mineral impregnated black oil sunflower seed, does Not store well, so more creativity is needed.  Bulk oats in large sacks have a better storage life due to the vitamin E content of oats.    When storing large bulk feed sacks, though, they should be cycled through a working chest freezer for 72 hours to kill insect eggs.  If planning to breed your poultry in the after-times, which is necessary if depending upon them well into the future, then finer feed will be needed for the babies, so either plan to grind your own or store the finer cut instant oats.

Enriched white or parboiled rice stores well, but must be thoroughly re-hydrated before giving to poultry, as undercooked rice may swell in their crops.  Dehydrated potato flakes are an option, as are soaked and sprouted whole grains.  Most corn is now GMO in the U.S., so we don't use it at all. 

Protein: Well-soaked and cooked legumes, their own cooked eggs, a partial left-over can of pet food that can't be refrigerated without electricity, dehydrated milk from storage, earth worms, salamanders, etc.

Grit: small stones on the ground, stored oyster shell for females, stored crushed granite

Calcium: dehydrated milk from storage (you see why there's no such thing as too much dry milk), crushed oyster shell in storage, dehydrated spinach from the garden, sea salt, their own egg shells

Sodium: sea salt, iodized table salt, especially in summer.  A lack of salt, when forgotten in the mash, is the only reason that we have ever lost poultry in the summer months.

Potassium: sea salt, cooked potatoes or potato flakes, white beans, squash

Vitamin D for leg strength: if natural sunlight is not available, then consider the oil from a can of tuna or other sea food mixed into their mash, or their own egg yolks, or fortified dry milk

Vitamin A: dehydrated greens, dehydrated carrots, dehydrated tomatoes, mashed or dried sweet potatoes or squash, their own yolks if they are free-ranged at all.  Some vitamin A is in dried milk.  If forage greens are expected to be wiped out by Px for a while, may want to store rabbit pellets, especially if keeping egg-producing land ducks.  Baby chicks don't process carotenes well, so need a non-vegetable source from the list. 

Natural de-wormer: Geobond, which comes in large sacks, is a blend of diatomaceous earth and French clay.  We mix a fat pinch (using all fingers and thumb of one hand) into the mash once daily and have never had worms in our eggs.

Water: Open bucket method works best in winter, but may be wasteful during the rest of the year if water is scarce.  Other than in wintertime, consider a dripping nipple feeder, at least as a backup for water buckets if things become too rough outdoors to carry water to the flock during the pole shift and traversing the debris field.  Individual hens need to be observed at first to make sure the teat method catches on.  Land ducks need more water changes than hens, as they must have bathing water to clear out their nostrils and moisten their eyes, for which a teat waterer won't work.  Poultry could also be housed in an attached garage or in the cellar during the worst of the passage if sanitation is carefully considered (maybe newspaper or a dropcloth on the floor piled with clean hay, with the litter being bagged for when it is safe to carry and compost outdoors again, as it will be a potential fire hazard).

Iodine (especially in a nuclear winter): a pinch of iodized salt, cranberries, soaked and cooked navy beans, potatoes, a drop of Lugol's in the water trough.

Arginine for egg-producing land ducks (a good type of poultry if you need a quiet flock, and especially quiet males as opposed to roosters): dried milk, forage seeds and nuts (seeds and nuts are not good long-term storage foods though), cooked legumes.

Choline (a B vitamin necessary for healthy nerve transmission and emulsifying fats into the watery blood plasma): their own egg yolks

Phosphorous: Dried milk is the best source, followed by legumes, seeds, nuts.

Trace minerals: sea salt
Wow, quite a massive treasure trove here, and thanks for posting.

I'd add that it might be wise if using eggshells as a calcium source, to crush and pulverize them if possible, before feeding back to chickens, as this helps prevent cannibalizing of eggs.  Once they learn to do this, they usually don't stop.

Also, a few years ago I read of a method of long-term storage for fresh, raw eggs, and I cannot now find it.  Was it something like immersion in olive oil?  In lard? 

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1011
  • Karma: +15/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #32 on: March 17, 2017, 10:26:26 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

I've heard of waterglass, or sodium silicate, before, but would love to learn other methods if you think of them!

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1774
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #33 on: March 17, 2017, 04:42:54 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

I've heard of waterglass, or sodium silicate, before, but would love to learn other methods if you think of them!
How do you use either of these?  And what exctly is waterglass?  Sodium silicate sounds like "salty sand"!

Do you know of their effectiveness?  And yes, if and when I find that source, I'll post it here.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Chickens
« Reply #34 on: March 19, 2017, 03:59:30 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

I've heard of waterglass, or sodium silicate, before, but would love to learn other methods if you think of them!

Kind of a long article, but the answers are in there... will post something more concise, soon...

Just part of the data: [1] "Unwashed, fertile homestead eggs seem to store much better than washed, unfertile agribiz eggs. Why? Probably for the simple reason that they're unwashed . . . and not because they're fertile. Hen fruit, as it comes from the chicken, is coated with a light layer of a natural sealing agent called "bloom". And, while a good wash may make a batch of eggs look more attractive, it also removes this natural protective coating . . . leaving the eggs more subject to aging and attack by the air and bacteria in the air."

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/how-to-store-fresh-eggs-zmaz77ndzgoe?pageid=3#PageContent3

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1774
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #35 on: March 19, 2017, 04:14:27 PM »
The place I read about long-term storage of eggs indicated they might be still good after a year or two, possibly more.  It was truly long-term storage for eggs, longer than any we commonly know about.

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1774
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #36 on: March 19, 2017, 04:23:04 PM »
Hi all,

We began keeping chickens as a home school project years ago when my children were young, and have had a number of years to improve our methods.  Regarding how to feed them in the after-time:
Once it's safe to pasture them again, there may be an abundance of bio-degradation insects, such as beetles, as well as other small creatures for them to eat.  But what to do during the pole-shift confinement period and winter?

1. We intensively studied poultry nutrition and make all our own feed, rather than relying upon the local feed store for factory-made scratch.  However, that means we still have to come up with the raw materials, either from what we grow, what we store, or what we can obtain nearby.  Obtaining in the after-times is the largest unknown, even if we live among farm people.  So the two of three variables that we can control are what we grow and what we store.  What we can grow is likely to take a battering from the incoming debris field that we are beginning to traverse, but we still must try our hardest to do this anyway, because it is one variable that we at least have some control over.  The third variable, what we store, needs to be extended to cover the largest possible stretch of time that we can manage. 

2. We need to get creative about storage space, unless one is fortunate enough to have one or more large barns (which are not guaranteed to remain standing in the after-time).  For example, when I have an old chest freezer die on me, I never discard it, as it is the perfect place to store sacks of raw feed grains away from rodents, insects, moisture, etc.  Metal trash cans with lids are good storage places if they are placed on a wooden plank to prevent wicking moisture from a concrete floor.  Plastic buckets with tight lids, such as the largest kind we use for human storage food, can also store animal feed.  The same oxygen absorbers can be used as for human food storage.  Outdoors, hay can be stored under a deck, etc., especially if it is wrapped in plastic sheeting or contractor-size trash bags and stacked on old asphalt shingles on the ground, or on pallets / skids, with maybe a tarp tied down over the whole thing.

3.  What stores well?  One of the key components of our feed, which is vitamin and mineral impregnated black oil sunflower seed, does Not store well, so more creativity is needed.  Bulk oats in large sacks have a better storage life due to the vitamin E content of oats.    When storing large bulk feed sacks, though, they should be cycled through a working chest freezer for 72 hours to kill insect eggs.  If planning to breed your poultry in the after-times, which is necessary if depending upon them well into the future, then finer feed will be needed for the babies, so either plan to grind your own or store the finer cut instant oats.

Enriched white or parboiled rice stores well, but must be thoroughly re-hydrated before giving to poultry, as undercooked rice may swell in their crops.  Dehydrated potato flakes are an option, as are soaked and sprouted whole grains.  Most corn is now GMO in the U.S., so we don't use it at all. 

Protein: Well-soaked and cooked legumes, their own cooked eggs, a partial left-over can of pet food that can't be refrigerated without electricity, dehydrated milk from storage, earth worms, salamanders, etc.

Grit: small stones on the ground, stored oyster shell for females, stored crushed granite

Calcium: dehydrated milk from storage (you see why there's no such thing as too much dry milk), crushed oyster shell in storage, dehydrated spinach from the garden, sea salt, their own egg shells

Sodium: sea salt, iodized table salt, especially in summer.  A lack of salt, when forgotten in the mash, is the only reason that we have ever lost poultry in the summer months.

Potassium: sea salt, cooked potatoes or potato flakes, white beans, squash

Vitamin D for leg strength: if natural sunlight is not available, then consider the oil from a can of tuna or other sea food mixed into their mash, or their own egg yolks, or fortified dry milk

Vitamin A: dehydrated greens, dehydrated carrots, dehydrated tomatoes, mashed or dried sweet potatoes or squash, their own yolks if they are free-ranged at all.  Some vitamin A is in dried milk.  If forage greens are expected to be wiped out by Px for a while, may want to store rabbit pellets, especially if keeping egg-producing land ducks.  Baby chicks don't process carotenes well, so need a non-vegetable source from the list. 

Natural de-wormer: Geobond, which comes in large sacks, is a blend of diatomaceous earth and French clay.  We mix a fat pinch (using all fingers and thumb of one hand) into the mash once daily and have never had worms in our eggs.

Water: Open bucket method works best in winter, but may be wasteful during the rest of the year if water is scarce.  Other than in wintertime, consider a dripping nipple feeder, at least as a backup for water buckets if things become too rough outdoors to carry water to the flock during the pole shift and traversing the debris field.  Individual hens need to be observed at first to make sure the teat method catches on.  Land ducks need more water changes than hens, as they must have bathing water to clear out their nostrils and moisten their eyes, for which a teat waterer won't work.  Poultry could also be housed in an attached garage or in the cellar during the worst of the passage if sanitation is carefully considered (maybe newspaper or a dropcloth on the floor piled with clean hay, with the litter being bagged for when it is safe to carry and compost outdoors again, as it will be a potential fire hazard).

Iodine (especially in a nuclear winter): a pinch of iodized salt, cranberries, soaked and cooked navy beans, potatoes, a drop of Lugol's in the water trough.

Arginine for egg-producing land ducks (a good type of poultry if you need a quiet flock, and especially quiet males as opposed to roosters): dried milk, forage seeds and nuts (seeds and nuts are not good long-term storage foods though), cooked legumes.

Choline (a B vitamin necessary for healthy nerve transmission and emulsifying fats into the watery blood plasma): their own egg yolks

Phosphorous: Dried milk is the best source, followed by legumes, seeds, nuts.

Trace minerals: sea salt
Lots of good info. here. 

Author Harvey Ussery wrote in The Small-Scale Poultry Flock that people have contacted him telling him that they raise chickens to get their own feed, and IIRC they do supplement with things they find in Nature such as hickory nuts, walnuts, etc., but that they can be gradually trained so they know if they want to survive, they'll have to forage better, and forage a lot.  Now I'm aware that situation may not be possible in all situations, but it does pay to ponder the breed of chicken before investing, to find a variety that can forage better than the less hardy ones.

Thanks for posting such a lot of poultry information.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Chickens
« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2017, 10:44:46 PM »
The place I read about long-term storage of eggs indicated they might be still good after a year or two, possibly more.  It was truly long-term storage for eggs, longer than any we commonly know about.

That's the one we need to find. :)

Solani

  • Trusted Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #38 on: March 19, 2017, 11:40:14 PM »
The place I read about long-term storage of eggs indicated they might be still good after a year or two, possibly more.  It was truly long-term storage for eggs, longer than any we commonly know about.

That's the one we need to find. :)

I have it since we store our eggs in waterglass. I'll post it tomorrow as I was just doing a quick check in here before stumbling to find my lair somewhere... lol
night night
//Solani
In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...

Socrates

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 565
  • Karma: +13/-0
  • literally, I've seen the end in a vision; DEADLY!
    • TEOMCROTE
Re: Chickens
« Reply #39 on: March 20, 2017, 02:27:37 AM »
Okay, never had chickens... but have been paying attention.
One of the things i learned is that chickens are in fact omnivores [not like people consider themselves omnivores, but true natural omnivores, like pigs and rats] and one of the things they do like to eat, contrary as it may seem to most 'city slickers', is carrion.
Rotting flesh is not only a normal part of a chicken diet but it also can lead to larvae that can be fed to the chickens, thereby creating a living source of protein that potentially lasts much longer than a slab of meat might.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 02:45:28 AM by Socrates »
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

Solani

  • Trusted Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2017, 10:12:37 AM »
The place I read about long-term storage of eggs indicated they might be still good after a year or two, possibly more.  It was truly long-term storage for eggs, longer than any we commonly know about.

That's the one we need to find. :)

I have it since we store our eggs in waterglass. I'll post it tomorrow as I was just doing a quick check in here before stumbling to find my lair somewhere... lol
night night
//Solani

Water glassing eggs (Water Glass - liquid sodium silicate)
Can be bought from here: https://www.lehmans.com/product/water-glass-liquid-sodium-silicate/animal-care
I know I’ve written this before but for whatever reason, my computer must have “eaten” it... :( So, I’ll write it again!! *grrrrr*

Anywho…
We use this method even though we do have a fridge. It started out as one of Dan’s (my partner) many “science projects”. Same as I have science projects of varying nature, just to see if something works and if I can perfect it somehow.
Last years “harvest” of water glassed eggs turned out way over our expectations. The last egg we cracked open, fried and ATE. (even though I was suspiciously eyeballing that thing which was viciously spitting hot grease at me from the frying pan and more than prepared to spit the potentially lethal THING out at the first hint of EEUUUWEE…) Have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised with the end result, as from what we’ve read from various sources it states that water glassed eggs can successfully be stored for up to 8 – 9 months. Dan had stored a dozen eggs in water glass mixed with distilled water in a large pickle jar and we opened 1 egg per month, looked at it, smelled it, fried it, smelled it again and on to the final test, tasting the darn thing. They were all good, even the one that was alone in the jar come month 12. So yes, it definitely works!

Here is our version of how we do the water glass eggs storage.
Will also write that we have not placed the jars with the eggs anywhere special other than directly on the kitchen floor, right between the fridge and the shelves on the outer wall. But yes, it is a bit cooler there than anywhere else in the kitchen, also not in direct light.

What we’ve found out is that the best eggs to use, are eggs that are NOT fertilized. No roster in the coop in other words… Rooster needs to be removed from the coop, or for your sanity and not having to listen to a crazy rooster LOUDLY complaining about missing his women… put a few hens that will be producing the non-fertilized eggs in a separate coop. It will take about 2 weeks before the eggs are not considered to be fertilized. Dang those roosters must be “potent”! ;)

Once you’ve got a sufficient amount of eggs from these hens, wipe them off lightly with a cloth, just enough to brush off loose debris. Do NOT wash the eggs or let them come in contact with water. Fresh eggs from the chicken coop have a thin protective layer of some sort that helps keep them fresh longer. (Prevents air to leak through the shell)

We use the large gallon pickle jars. Clean jars and dry them. To make the water glass solution for your eggs you will need to have either bought distilled water, or boiled your own water in a nonmetal pot. So far, we prefer buying the distilled water as long as it’s out there to buy and due to varying water quality, I’d go for the store bought distilled water as long as it’s out there to buy…

Carefully place your eggs in the (empty clean) jar. Have read about folks claiming that the eggs should not be touching each other. How you would be able to store multiple eggs in a jar without the eggs touching each other, is a mystery to me and something we’ve proved doesn’t matter whatsoever… Once you’ve got your eggs in the jar. Make a mixture of 1-part water glass and 9 parts distilled water, pour the mixed solution over the eggs in the jar. Make sure you have at least an inch and a half of water glass mixture covering the top eggs. Screw the lid on tight and place the jar with water glassed eggs somewhere, preferably cooler than room temperature and not in direct sunlight. I prefer a shadowy place such as on the floor between our fridge and wall… On the other hand, we do have cold floors so that in itself could be why they’re staying fresh for as long as they have.

When you decide to use the water glassed eggs, lift the jar up on the counter next to the sink. Make sure it’s sitting stable on the counter, open jar, put on rubber or latex glove (this stuff is slimy and very slippery…) carefully remove one egg at a time, if you are planning on using more than one egg. Rinse each one as you take them out of the jar under the tap in cold water to get rid of the slime. Water glass/slime is not poisonous at all but I prefer rinsing them off before using them as it makes it a lot easier to hold on to them when cracking them open…

Crack each egg you are going to use in a separate container and not all of them one after another in the same container you will be using to let’s say, bake a cake or something. All it takes is one bad egg and you’ll have to junk the whole thing. Do the look and smell test, should NOT smell bad, eggs whites should be clear, the yolks do tend to be a bit fragile especially the older they get but still good. Of course if you find a “floater” in the jar, junk it… We haven’t come across any floaters yet but you can find floaters in fresh eggs too, so I’m just waiting to bump into one sooner or later.

By the end of the year, the water glass mixture did become a bit "cloudy" but that seems to be normal and didn't cause any harm to the eggs. Don't use the same water glass mixture when making the next round of water glassed eggs.

This year we have prepared 3 gallon jars of eggs and are planning on finding out if we can push the “best before” date further than a year.

Hope this will be useful

//Solani
In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1774
  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #41 on: March 21, 2017, 03:52:55 PM »
The place I read about long-term storage of eggs indicated they might be still good after a year or two, possibly more.  It was truly long-term storage for eggs, longer than any we commonly know about.

That's the one we need to find. :)

I have it since we store our eggs in waterglass. I'll post it tomorrow as I was just doing a quick check in here before stumbling to find my lair somewhere... lol
night night
//Solani

Water glassing eggs (Water Glass - liquid sodium silicate)
Can be bought from here: https://www.lehmans.com/product/water-glass-liquid-sodium-silicate/animal-care
I know I’ve written this before but for whatever reason, my computer must have “eaten” it... :( So, I’ll write it again!! *grrrrr*

Anywho…
We use this method even though we do have a fridge. It started out as one of Dan’s (my partner) many “science projects”. Same as I have science projects of varying nature, just to see if something works and if I can perfect it somehow.
Last years “harvest” of water glassed eggs turned out way over our expectations. The last egg we cracked open, fried and ATE. (even though I was suspiciously eyeballing that thing which was viciously spitting hot grease at me from the frying pan and more than prepared to spit the potentially lethal THING out at the first hint of EEUUUWEE…) Have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised with the end result, as from what we’ve read from various sources it states that water glassed eggs can successfully be stored for up to 8 – 9 months. Dan had stored a dozen eggs in water glass mixed with distilled water in a large pickle jar and we opened 1 egg per month, looked at it, smelled it, fried it, smelled it again and on to the final test, tasting the darn thing. They were all good, even the one that was alone in the jar come month 12. So yes, it definitely works!

Here is our version of how we do the water glass eggs storage.
Will also write that we have not placed the jars with the eggs anywhere special other than directly on the kitchen floor, right between the fridge and the shelves on the outer wall. But yes, it is a bit cooler there than anywhere else in the kitchen, also not in direct light.

What we’ve found out is that the best eggs to use, are eggs that are NOT fertilized. No roster in the coop in other words… Rooster needs to be removed from the coop, or for your sanity and not having to listen to a crazy rooster LOUDLY complaining about missing his women… put a few hens that will be producing the non-fertilized eggs in a separate coop. It will take about 2 weeks before the eggs are not considered to be fertilized. Dang those roosters must be “potent”! ;)

Once you’ve got a sufficient amount of eggs from these hens, wipe them off lightly with a cloth, just enough to brush off loose debris. Do NOT wash the eggs or let them come in contact with water. Fresh eggs from the chicken coop have a thin protective layer of some sort that helps keep them fresh longer. (Prevents air to leak through the shell)

We use the large gallon pickle jars. Clean jars and dry them. To make the water glass solution for your eggs you will need to have either bought distilled water, or boiled your own water in a nonmetal pot. So far, we prefer buying the distilled water as long as it’s out there to buy and due to varying water quality, I’d go for the store bought distilled water as long as it’s out there to buy…

Carefully place your eggs in the (empty clean) jar. Have read about folks claiming that the eggs should not be touching each other. How you would be able to store multiple eggs in a jar without the eggs touching each other, is a mystery to me and something we’ve proved doesn’t matter whatsoever… Once you’ve got your eggs in the jar. Make a mixture of 1-part water glass and 9 parts distilled water, pour the mixed solution over the eggs in the jar. Make sure you have at least an inch and a half of water glass mixture covering the top eggs. Screw the lid on tight and place the jar with water glassed eggs somewhere, preferably cooler than room temperature and not in direct sunlight. I prefer a shadowy place such as on the floor between our fridge and wall… On the other hand, we do have cold floors so that in itself could be why they’re staying fresh for as long as they have.

When you decide to use the water glassed eggs, lift the jar up on the counter next to the sink. Make sure it’s sitting stable on the counter, open jar, put on rubber or latex glove (this stuff is slimy and very slippery…) carefully remove one egg at a time, if you are planning on using more than one egg. Rinse each one as you take them out of the jar under the tap in cold water to get rid of the slime. Water glass/slime is not poisonous at all but I prefer rinsing them off before using them as it makes it a lot easier to hold on to them when cracking them open…

Crack each egg you are going to use in a separate container and not all of them one after another in the same container you will be using to let’s say, bake a cake or something. All it takes is one bad egg and you’ll have to junk the whole thing. Do the look and smell test, should NOT smell bad, eggs whites should be clear, the yolks do tend to be a bit fragile especially the older they get but still good. Of course if you find a “floater” in the jar, junk it… We haven’t come across any floaters yet but you can find floaters in fresh eggs too, so I’m just waiting to bump into one sooner or later.

By the end of the year, the water glass mixture did become a bit "cloudy" but that seems to be normal and didn't cause any harm to the eggs. Don't use the same water glass mixture when making the next round of water glassed eggs.

This year we have prepared 3 gallon jars of eggs and are planning on finding out if we can push the “best before” date further than a year.

Hope this will be useful

//Solani
Solani, thanks so much for posting this, as it looks like exactly what I've been looking for.  Now getting anxious to try my first experimental batch.

Also, I wonder if anyone has ever tried this on eggs that are already hard-boiled?  Still, this is really helpful info. for those of us who think we might be without electricity or any means to keep eggs cold, and worse, no means to obtain eggs for a while.

Solani

  • Trusted Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #42 on: March 21, 2017, 09:31:19 PM »
Solani, thanks so much for posting this, as it looks like exactly what I've been looking for.  Now getting anxious to try my first experimental batch.

Also, I wonder if anyone has ever tried this on eggs that are already hard-boiled?  Still, this is really helpful info. for those of us who think we might be without electricity or any means to keep eggs cold, and worse, no means to obtain eggs for a while.

Hmmm... Haven't thought about doing it with already hard-boiled eggs. Not sure how that would work. I'm guessing one would have to leave the shells on the eggs. Will have to try it out. Could also try pressure canning hard-boiled peeled egg's. I know you can pickle eggs but I totally detest the taste of pickled eggs!! *uurrk* I like most everything else that is pickled but eggs... Guess I gotta draw the line somewhere! ;D

Found an old (very old) book in one of Dan's book-boxes that had a bunch of both recipes and food storage ways from the olden days. That's where he got the water glassing eggs method from.

I am however going to try dehydrating eggs. Found an interesting article about that a few weeks ago. Might as well give that a try since I'm up to my eyeballs in canning meats, veggies, rendered beef-fat, pemmican and sealing dry goods in mylar bags. Had to leave all my preps back with my kids in Sweden when I came over here, so I've had to start from scratch again. Dan's a prepper-minded man but... He really never understood the idea of rotating his food stash... *sigh*
//Solani
In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Chickens
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2017, 11:29:36 PM »
Solani, thanks so much for posting this, as it looks like exactly what I've been looking for.  Now getting anxious to try my first experimental batch.

Also, I wonder if anyone has ever tried this on eggs that are already hard-boiled?  Still, this is really helpful info. for those of us who think we might be without electricity or any means to keep eggs cold, and worse, no means to obtain eggs for a while.

Hmmm... Haven't thought about doing it with already hard-boiled eggs. Not sure how that would work. I'm guessing one would have to leave the shells on the eggs. Will have to try it out. Could also try pressure canning hard-boiled peeled egg's. I know you can pickle eggs but I totally detest the taste of pickled eggs!! *uurrk* I like most everything else that is pickled but eggs... Guess I gotta draw the line somewhere! ;D

Found an old (very old) book in one of Dan's book-boxes that had a bunch of both recipes and food storage ways from the olden days. That's where he got the water glassing eggs method from.

I am however going to try dehydrating eggs. Found an interesting article about that a few weeks ago. Might as well give that a try since I'm up to my eyeballs in canning meats, veggies, rendered beef-fat, pemmican and sealing dry goods in mylar bags. Had to leave all my preps back with my kids in Sweden when I came over here, so I've had to start from scratch again. Dan's a prepper-minded man but... He really never understood the idea of rotating his food stash... *sigh*
//Solani

Solani, if you can locate that old book again, anything you would like to post about keeping food cool, this is one place and this is another:

Topic: Keeping food cool
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5070.msg71314#msg71314

:)
- Barb Townsend

Solani

  • Trusted Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Chickens
« Reply #44 on: March 22, 2017, 05:20:30 AM »

Solani, if you can locate that old book again, anything you would like to post about keeping food cool, this is one place and this is another:

Topic: Keeping food cool
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5070.msg71314#msg71314

:)
- Barb Townsend

Yupp, will do!  ;)
In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...