Author Topic: Home Schooling  (Read 8892 times)

Yowbarb

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Home Schooling
« on: October 14, 2012, 07:42:36 AM »
(I think this is all free.) More later.

Homeschool Lesson Planning Forms

http://donnayoung.org/forms/planners/
« Last Edit: October 15, 2012, 07:32:44 AM by Montanabarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2012, 09:39:00 AM »
Yes, that Donna Young one is free...
I really couldn't tell you all what the best home lesson plans are. Will do some research.
Whatevr plan is used it is important to have one as simply worded as possibloe so the main emphasis is on actually learning the basics. Make sure there are plenty of dictionaries and some reference books since there might not be any net. -Yowbarb

.....................................
http://donnayoung.org/forms/planners/

http://donnayoung.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=72ee3f624c8036e85fd9799a8&id=4c6688b8a4

ALSO:

http://www.ehow.com/how_4464471_plan-home-school-work-schedule.html 

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2012, 09:48:27 AM »
http://www.ehow.com/how_4464471_plan-home-school-work-schedule.html

EHow Moms

eHow Education Homeschooling in Education Home School Lesson Plans How to Plan a Home School Work Schedule
How to Plan a Home School Work Schedule
By April Sanders, eHow Contributor

Homeschooling, if done effectively, can be a positive and rewarding experience for both the parent and child. To homeschool effectively, however, takes time and careful planning. One of the first--and most important--things to do is to create a work schedule. This will ensure that you are taking your child's education seriously. Here we will give you some ideas for planning a work schedule for your homeschooled child.

Instructions
1
Observe your children carefully. When do they get hungry? When do they seem to need some exercise? When are they sleepiest? Work your schedule around these things, planning some time for exercise when they need it and planning the harder subjects such as math and reading for when they are at their freshest.

2
Plan a firm beginning and ending to your day. Many homeschooled children think that homeschooling means they get to sleep in, play video games and then maybe do some work whenever their mom or dad makes them do it. This should not be the case! Make sure you start and end your school day at the same time every day. In fact, stick to the same schedule, while allowing for a little bit of flexibility, every day or as much as possible. This will help your day feel orderly and create the added benefit of allowing your children to feel like they've accomplished something every day.

3
Plan to meet the grade and age level needs of your child. Younger children can only sit still for so long! Kindergartners can only spend about 5 to 10 minutes at the most on one lesson, while a sixth grader can spend 30 to 45 minutes on a lesson. Younger children love hands-on activities, while older children should focus on writing, testing and note-taking skills in order to prepare them for college.

4
Do not try to copy a typical school day in a public school classroom. Your school day will not last as long. Your child is receiving one-on-one attention, and this will allow her to complete tasks that would take much longer in a traditional classroom. Make sure to check your state's guidelines for skills that should be mastered by the end of each grade level when planning lessons.

5
Don't forget to allow for social skills as well as academic ones! Plan some field trips and recesses into your schedule. Meet up with other homeschooling parents for special activities. Sign your child up for music lessons. Remember that a good education does not mean only mastering the three R's!

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Read more: How to Plan a Home School Work Schedule | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4464471_plan-home-school-work-schedule.html#ixzz29IBsvMCP

...

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Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2012, 10:26:37 AM »
Young teens -young adults...

http://school.familyeducation.com/home-schooling/teen/37519.html

Homeschooling Teens
by Isabel Shaw

The Whys, and the Must-Haves

The idea of homeschooling through high school can be scary. Parents tell me, "I could never homeschool my teen - I barely got through some of my own high school classes!" But homeschool advocates are discovering there's a better way for teens to learn, and homeschooling your high-schooler may be easier than you think.

Why Homeschool?
It's not uncommon for homeschooled teens to complete four years of traditional high-school studies in 24 months or less. How can that be? Teens who learn at home are able to focus their energy and resources on the task at hand. With no distractions, it's amazing how efficiently kids learn. This principle is illustrated by the requirements for schooled kids who are unable to attend classes due to illness. Most schools require 1-1/2 to 5 hours of at-home instruction for each week of missed classroom learning.

Cafi Cohen -- author of And What About College? How Homeschooling Leads to Admission to the Best Colleges and Universities -- spent two full days observing public school classes. During those days, she kept track of administrative time versus on-task time. On-task time is roughly defined as students really doing something - reading, writing, listening to lectures, etc. Cohen discovered that less than one hour out of each six-hour school day was spent on-task. The bulk of the day was spent on administrative duties: taking attendance, collecting homework and reports, making announcements, passing out supplies, preparing for activities, cleaning up, and discipline - perhaps the biggest time-waster of all.

Many teens are also overwhelmed by the prospect of spending an hour or more a day on the school bus getting to and from school, only to be faced with three or more hours of homework in the evening. In the teen group I facilitate, teens stress wasted time as a major reason for homeschooling along with problems in the school environment: peer pressure, negative influences (drugs and sex), bullying, and even personal safety.

Can Anyone Homeschool?
Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states. Many states have no specific requirements regarding the educational background of parents who homeschool. Studies have shown that homeschooled students repeatedly outperform their schooled peers on standardized tests, regardless of a parent's level of formal education.

With a little planning, a little cooperation from your teen, (yes, sometimes they actually do cooperate!), and creative record keeping, you'll be packing your homeschooled kids off to college -- or wherever life's path will take them -- before you know it!

How Do I Start?
Investigate your homeschooling options, and then set up a workable plan with your teen. This should be an individualized program, based on your teen's strengths and weaknesses, passions, and learning style. Successful homeschoolers are those who break away from the "one-size-fits-all" curriculum, that most of us remember. Aim for a course of study that allows your kids the freedom to pursue their interests, cover the basics, and become a lifelong learner. The following books will show you exactly how to do this.

Must-Have Books for Homeschooling Teens
Homeschooling: The Teen Years -- Your Complete Guide to Successfully Homeschooling the 13- to 18-Year Old by Cafi Cohen. If you can buy only one homeschooling book, this is it.
Homeschoolers' College Admissions Handbook -- Preparing 12- to 18-Year-Olds for Success in the College of Their Choiceby Cafi Cohen . For kids with college in their future, Cohen provides valuable information and resources for both parents and teens.
The Teenage Liberation Handbook (a classic among homeschool families) and Real Lives: Eleven Teenagers Who Don't Go to School, both by Grace Llewellyn. These books will inspire and guide your teen with real stories about kids who learn in freedom.
The Big Book of Home Learning: Junior High Through College by Mary Pride. An enormous collection of resources and advice from a homechooling veteran.
The Homeschooling Book of Answers: The 88 Most Important Questions Answered by Homeschooling's Most Respected Voices by Linda Dobson. The best book for those new to homeschooling. Intelligent answers to just about every homeschooling question.
The Homeschooler's Guide to Portfolios and Transcripts by Loretta Heuer. Covers the most difficult aspect of homeschooling teens: maintaining accurate records.
Teaching and Record Keeping

What Subjects Do I Teach?
Homeschooling: The Teen Years by Cafi Cohen outlines how to set up and follow a high school curriculum. If your child plans to attend college, Cohen advises you to begin your studies with the following subjects:

Four years of language arts (English)
Three years of math (usually through Geometry or Algebra II)
Two to three years of science
Three to four years of social studies (History and Geography)
Two years of foreign language
Two years of electives (Music and Drama, for example)
If college is not in your teens' future, or at least not in the immediate future, he or she has more freedom choosing a course of study. The following books can help your teen decide the future path that is right for him:
The Question Is College: On Finding and Doing Work You Love, by Herbert Kohl, provides thoughtful guidance, concrete examples, and useful tools to plot a course toward achieving your goals.
The Uncollege Alternative by Danielle Wood explains how to create a profitable, exciting, and creative future without a college degree.
Success Without College by Linda Lee has suggestions for achieving personal and career goals by either delaying college plans or finding a direct route to the working world.
The Teenage Liberation Handbook by Grace Llewellyn highlights the learning styles and accomplishments of teens who are learning all the time -- but not in the traditional sense.
Covering Difficult or Unfamiliar Subjects
Covering difficult or unfamiliar subjects is not as hard as it seems. Parents can:

Purchase a curriculum from a homeschool curriculum provider.
Use a correspondence or online school.
Use educational video courses (check with your library).
Hire a tutor.
Take an online class.
Use educational computer software.
Take a class at a community college.
Learn the material along with your teen.
Start your own class
Homeschoolers are often able to team up with other parents and create the classes their kids need. My girls wanted a French class, but private sessions were too costly. Group lessons (10 or more kids) were reasonable. I contacted homeschool support groups in my area and sent email messages to local homeschooling families to see if anyone was interested. In two days, I had 15 respondents, and eventually a waiting list!

You can often find resources right in your community — all you have to do is ask. Several parents of teens persuaded a retired chemistry teacher to teach their kids. Another group enlisted the help of a former English teacher, now a full-time mom, who set up a homeschool writing club in her home. And little persuasion was needed to convince an enthusiastic chess coach to start an official chess club for homeschoolers.

Record Keeping
It's wise to keep track of your teen's activities. Loretta Heuer's The Homeschooler's Guide to Portfolios and Transcripts will show you how. You may need to maintain accurate records to comply with your state's statutes, or to submit them if your child must reenter high school. Independent study programs also require record keeping. For college-bound kids, remember: The records you keep today will be used tomorrow to create a portfolio for college admissions.

Record keeping can be as simple as a daily journal, or filling in each activity on a large calendar. The level of detail shown in your records will depend on both your teen's goals and your homeschooling style.

Diplomas and College

High School Diploma
Do homeschoolers need a high school diploma? Sometimes. Do they need a diploma from an accredited school? According to Cafi Cohen, "The experience of thousands of families indicates that the answer is 'almost never.'"

Cohen elaborates: "Every homeschooler can have a document verifying graduation from high school because -- as the principals and administrators of small private schools -- all homeschool parents can create their own diplomas." Are these diplomas recognized? "College admissions officers rely primarily on transcripts, test scores, and letters of recommendation. Most never ask about diplomas because typical applicants, high-school seniors, do not yet have them."

What about job applications? Cohen advises parents: "Employers care mostly about experience. By granting your own diploma, your teenager can answer "yes" to the diploma question on most job applications. And, interestingly, employers never seem to phrase the question this way: 'Do you have a diploma from an accredited high school?'"

The only exception may be the military. If you know your son or daughter plans to enlist in the Army, Navy, Marines, or Air Force, consider using an accredited diploma-granting independent-study program like Clonlara School or American School (1-800-228-5600). Check with your local recruiter about current regulations for homeschool students.

GED High School Equivalency Diploma
The initials GED stand for General Education Development. The GED test measures how well someone has mastered the skills and general knowledge that are acquired in a four-year high school education. GED online is a special website dedicated to helping students prepare online for the GED High School Equivalency Test. For homeschool students desiring a formal diploma, the GED is another option.

College-Bound-Homeschoolers
If you're looking for a comprehensive guide covering just about every known approach to earning a college degree, Bear's Guide to Earning College Degrees Nontraditionally by John and Mariah Bear is for you. Read this book early - before you make your teen's college plans - it may change the way you homeschool!

Homeschoolers are accepted and welcomed at most colleges. Admissions policies vary, so plan ahead to meet the requirements of colleges that interest you. Generally speaking, testing requirements (ACT/SAT I & SAT II) are the same for homeschoolers and schooled kids. Click here for detailed information on admissions testing.

Most parents of teens who learn at home are motivated, resourceful, and determined to provide the best educational resources for their kids. When I ask parents of older homeschooled kids what they would change if they could do it over again, their replies are often the same: I would worry less, and enjoy my kids more. Sounds like good advice to me.

More on: How to Homeschool http://school.familyeducation.com/famed/ads/rb_ParentFurther-EveryKid_700-500.html?page_type=fetopic&page=%2Fhome-schooling%2Feducational-philosophy%2F34545.html%3Fdetoured%3D1 /size]

Read more on FamilyEducation: http://school.familyeducation.com/home-schooling/teen/37519.html#ixzz29IEqoEmR

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2013, 11:56:12 AM »
http://www.amazon.com/100-Top-Picks-Homeschool-Curriculum/dp/0805431381

100 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum: Choosing the Right Curriculum and Approach for Your Child's Learning Style Paperback

by Cathy Duffy   (Author)   
91 customer reviews

4 and one half stars

NativeMom72

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2013, 08:35:04 PM »
Thank you Barb for posting these great resources!

I am seriously considering homeschool my younger two boys-- our school district is one of the worst in the nation. I find myself giving my 12 year old assignments on the weekends to supplement what is not taught at his school!

~pB

Wishing you good luck with this.  :)
« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 02:23:43 AM by Yowbarb »
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2013, 02:24:43 AM »
Pbutter I accidentally posted my reply in your post...and so on.
Well good luck, anyway.  ;D

NativeMom72

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2013, 01:18:21 PM »
Lol- Thank you for the encouragement Barb-- I am looking into some resources now as I write this!

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2013, 11:15:12 PM »
Lol- Thank you for the encouragement Barb-- I am looking into some resources now as I write this!

~pB

pbutter, I think I will get a stash of educational materials together. you never can tell who might need them.. I assume most survival groups will have some children there...life will go on...babies will be born...

NativeMom72

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2013, 11:04:27 PM »
Learning through play is very important to a young child's development. However, once the children are old enough to attend school, more emphasis is placed on drills and testing-- and not enough on, believe it or not...Learning
Once upon a time, our educational system was the envy of the world, but today, our children do not fare well on test scores at International level despite the constant and ever present test preparation...

In Finland, as a contrast, students are doing quite well..
We in the U.S. can learn a lot from the Finnish educational system.
Here are some articles that help illustrate why their education model is one of the most successful in the "Western World"

Why We Might Send Our Child to Schools in Finland, Not the U.S.

http://letchildrenplay.com/articles/schools-in-finland/

26 Amazing Facts About Finland's Unorthodox Education System

http://www.businessinsider.com/finland-education-school-2011-12#finnish-children-dont-start-school-until-they-are-7-1



~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2013, 07:05:34 AM »
They surely look a lot happier than a lot of American children. Probably less regimented.
- Yowbarb

NativeMom72

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2013, 08:19:57 PM »
They surely look a lot happier than a lot of American children. Probably less regimented.
- Yowbarb

Yes Barb, they sure do, and I am sure it is because their system is not as regimented as the American Education system.

~pB

“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

NativeMom72

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2013, 09:00:37 PM »
Hello Everyone,

I want to share a recent experience of mine in terms of educating my youngest child. He is 2 years old and had been in daycare since 3 months old because I had to go back to work. As he grew older, I had become unhappy with the daycare's  lack of an educational component, plus there some other issues that caused me to pull him from the center. I anguished over where to place him, all the "good" preschools had waiting lists that were years long and a nanny/babysitter was too expensive.

Fortunately, a good friend of mine had told me of a school she had place her daughter and she raved about it. But the most impressive aspect of the school was that it was a coop preschool-- a school where all the families pitch in to help run the school in order to keep costs down. Now I know this is not a new idea, but I was so super excited to find one close to home whose price was reasonable and where the children thrive.

The school has a holistic approach in learning, emphasizing in teaching self-reliance and self-responsibility while calling the student's attention to the needs of the community. There is also alot of interaction with nature, which is a plus. Every parent is responsible for a few hours "in schooling" per month which involves cleaning, sorting, and helping the teachers. Other than the in-schooling, we get to pick "jobs"  that help the school run smoothly-- my job is the Handyperson :) I am in the process of designing/building a playhouse for the backyard out of pallets-lol!

We like the school very much, my little guy is having a blast and he is learning lots- I think that this would be such a great alternative in a community with parents who would like their young children in a caring, educational setting who may not be able to afford to spend alot on a school and may not be able to afford to stay home to homeschool.

Here is a nice little article on how to start a cooperative nursery school:

Cooperative Nuts And Bolts: Starting Your Own Preschool
http://teachertomsblog.blogspot.com/2011/08/cooperative-nuts-and-bolts-starting.html

~pB

“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

bk

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bk

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Re: Home Schooling
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2013, 05:00:04 PM »
here is a link for the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica text

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica_Eleventh_Edition#External_links

This is the pdf for a to an it take awhile over 1000 pages

https://ia700300.us.archive.org/16/items/encyclopaediabri01chisrich/encyclopaediabri01chisrich.pdf

No modern age things since it is 1911 but a lot of good info for rebuilding or teaching.