Author Topic: Survival Recipes  (Read 24054 times)

ilinda

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #120 on: March 03, 2015, 04:53:44 PM »
This wild food needs no recipe actually.  It is wintercress and is a broccoli relative.  I try to locate the various plants in late fall or any time in winter so that when it snows I will know exactly where some are.  This came in handy this year. 

Now that snow is here and not going away for a while I decided to rake away the snow and find one.  Sure enough there it is, under snow and ice, still green and ready to harvest.  It would not take too many leaves to make a salad.  I suppose some people will steam it, but I eat it raw, on the go, or in a salad.

Note that snow, ice, and cold temperatures do not bother it.  Now THAT is a survival food.  It will start to get bitter in the spring and then send up a stalk with flowers, then seeds.  Harvest while weather is cold.


Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #121 on: March 29, 2016, 10:30:50 PM »
http://www.buzzfeed.com/adambianchi/these-tater-tots-are-made-of-broccoli-and-theyre-amazing-as#.ht4ZQbm4KL

These “Tater Tots” Are Made Of Broccoli And They’re Amazing As Life
Tot it up!

Broccoli Tots 

video link: https://youtu.be/PG0GVNN-rm4

Tasty posted on Mar. 19, 2016, at 5:44 p.m.
Published on Mar 19, 2016

INGREDIENTS

12 ounces broccoli, cut into small florets
 ¼ cup scallions, thinly sliced
 2 large garlic cloves, finely diced
 ⅔ cup shredded cheddar cheese
 1 egg, beaten
 ⅔ cup bread crumbs
 Salt & pepper
 Optional: 2 tsp Sriracha (optional but recommended!)

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring to a boil. Aggressively season with salt. Blanch the broccoli in boiling water for about two minutes. Drain and finely chop the cooked broccoli. In a mixing bowl, add broccoli, scallions, garlic, cheddar, egg, and bread crumbs. Optional: Add hot sauce of choice. Mix well and chill in the refrigerator for 15–20 minutes.

Spray a nonstick baking sheet with nonstick spray. Shape the mixture into tot shapes and spread them evenly on the sheet.

Bake for 8–9 minutes. Flip and then bake for an additional 8–9 minutes on the other side until golden brown

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #122 on: February 26, 2017, 12:04:47 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Dried Salt Fish keeps a long, long time. If your survival location is near a river, spend some time fishing and salt and dry the fish.  ;D If tshtf the water could become polluted, so may as well lay in a store of dried fish and of course, plenty of water.
...

Excerpts from article, DIY: Dried Salt Fish

Summer is a great time to make your own dried salt fish. (You can do it in cold weather too, as long as you have good strong sun.) If you live in a dry climate so much the better, but we made our own here in Penang, where humidity levels regularly hover above seventy per cent.
To make salt fish it's best to have, or construct, some sort of hanging apparatus outside where it catches sunlight. (You can also lay your fish on a rattan mat or other material, but the more of the fish that's exposed to air and sun all at once, the more evenly they'll dry and the quicker the whole process will go.) We stuck a broomstick in a hole in the wall that surrounds our property and suspended our skewered salted fish from it with plastic twine.
Preferably you will time this project to start the fish drying early in the morning. Note that they need to wallow in salt in the fridge overnight or up to 24 hours before you hang them outside to dry.

Here's the process:

1.   Procure some fish. Any fish will do, really. Oily fish like sardines, anchovies, mackerel, smelt, ocean trout and salmon will result in the strongest flavor. If you're a salt fish newbie you might want to give it a go with a milder fish: trout, sea bass, john dory, flounder, halibut, cod etc.
2.   Clean your fish well. If the fish are small (the ones in the photo above were about 6 inches long) you can leave them whole -- just cut off the head and, if you like, fins and tail. If you're using fillets slice them into manageable pieces. A slab of salmon, for instance, I might slice into 6 by 2-inch strips. Remove as many bones as you can, but if you plan to deep-fry the little buggers the bones will become crispy enough to eat.
3.   Dry the fish, and then rub them with plenty of good quality salt -- sea salt, kosher salt, whatever. I'm convinced that the problem with alot of commercial dry salt fish is the salt that's used by the maker -- nasty heavily iodized salt makes for nasty salt fish. Put the fish in a bowl or a ceramic baking dish, cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge -- or a very cool, dark place) overnight or for up to 24 hours.
4.   Remove the fish and rinse them well to get rid of the salt, and pat them dry. Skewer the fish in a way that exposes as much surface area as possible to air and sun. For instance, if you're drying whole fish, pull the sides of the fish apart so that the gut area opens up (see photo).
5.   Hang the fish in the sun. If you're concerned about flies and other insects (strangely, despite Penang's humid heat not a single insect bothered our fish when they were hanging outside) drape your fish with cheesecloth. You may want to adjust the position of the fish throughout the day, turning them front to back or whatnot, to get even sun exposure.
6.   Bring the fish inside at the end of the day and give it a gentle squeeze. You're not looking for cardboard, but the fish should be relatively dry. If any moisture comes to your fingers they're not done -- place them, covered, back in the fridge overnight (or in a very cool, dark place) and repeat the drying process the next day. Two days should do it.
7.   Use the fish right away, or store in the fridge.
Think about variations that bring dried seasonings into play -- you might rub your fish with chili flakes before hanging it out to dry, or with lemon zest or zatar.
 
Update 28 August 2012: See comments below for links to photos taken by Lynn Cook, an EA reader in Australia, who tried our recipe with excellent results!
http://eatingasia.typepad.com/eatingasia/2012/07/diy-dried-salt-fish.html

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #123 on: February 26, 2017, 12:08:06 AM »
This wild food needs no recipe actually.  It is wintercress and is a broccoli relative.  I try to locate the various plants in late fall or any time in winter so that when it snows I will know exactly where some are.  This came in handy this year. 

Now that snow is here and not going away for a while I decided to rake away the snow and find one.  Sure enough there it is, under snow and ice, still green and ready to harvest.  It would not take too many leaves to make a salad.  I suppose some people will steam it, but I eat it raw, on the go, or in a salad.

Note that snow, ice, and cold temperatures do not bother it.  Now THAT is a survival food.  It will start to get bitter in the spring and then send up a stalk with flowers, then seeds.  Harvest while weather is cold.
ilinda, that is great info. The sturdy dark green plants like that are so life-giving. A true survival food.

ilinda

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #124 on: February 26, 2017, 03:34:19 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Dried Salt Fish keeps a long, long time. If your survival location is near a river, spend some time fishing and salt and dry the fish.  ;D If tshtf the water could become polluted, so may as well lay in a store of dried fish and of course, plenty of water.
...

Excerpts from article, DIY: Dried Salt Fish

Summer is a great time to make your own dried salt fish. (You can do it in cold weather too, as long as you have good strong sun.) If you live in a dry climate so much the better, but we made our own here in Penang, where humidity levels regularly hover above seventy per cent.
To make salt fish it's best to have, or construct, some sort of hanging apparatus outside where it catches sunlight. (You can also lay your fish on a rattan mat or other material, but the more of the fish that's exposed to air and sun all at once, the more evenly they'll dry and the quicker the whole process will go.) We stuck a broomstick in a hole in the wall that surrounds our property and suspended our skewered salted fish from it with plastic twine.
Preferably you will time this project to start the fish drying early in the morning. Note that they need to wallow in salt in the fridge overnight or up to 24 hours before you hang them outside to dry.

Here's the process:

1.   Procure some fish. Any fish will do, really. Oily fish like sardines, anchovies, mackerel, smelt, ocean trout and salmon will result in the strongest flavor. If you're a salt fish newbie you might want to give it a go with a milder fish: trout, sea bass, john dory, flounder, halibut, cod etc.
2.   Clean your fish well. If the fish are small (the ones in the photo above were about 6 inches long) you can leave them whole -- just cut off the head and, if you like, fins and tail. If you're using fillets slice them into manageable pieces. A slab of salmon, for instance, I might slice into 6 by 2-inch strips. Remove as many bones as you can, but if you plan to deep-fry the little buggers the bones will become crispy enough to eat.
3.   Dry the fish, and then rub them with plenty of good quality salt -- sea salt, kosher salt, whatever. I'm convinced that the problem with alot of commercial dry salt fish is the salt that's used by the maker -- nasty heavily iodized salt makes for nasty salt fish. Put the fish in a bowl or a ceramic baking dish, cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge -- or a very cool, dark place) overnight or for up to 24 hours.
4.   Remove the fish and rinse them well to get rid of the salt, and pat them dry. Skewer the fish in a way that exposes as much surface area as possible to air and sun. For instance, if you're drying whole fish, pull the sides of the fish apart so that the gut area opens up (see photo).
5.   Hang the fish in the sun. If you're concerned about flies and other insects (strangely, despite Penang's humid heat not a single insect bothered our fish when they were hanging outside) drape your fish with cheesecloth. You may want to adjust the position of the fish throughout the day, turning them front to back or whatnot, to get even sun exposure.
6.   Bring the fish inside at the end of the day and give it a gentle squeeze. You're not looking for cardboard, but the fish should be relatively dry. If any moisture comes to your fingers they're not done -- place them, covered, back in the fridge overnight (or in a very cool, dark place) and repeat the drying process the next day. Two days should do it.
7.   Use the fish right away, or store in the fridge.
Think about variations that bring dried seasonings into play -- you might rub your fish with chili flakes before hanging it out to dry, or with lemon zest or zatar.
 
Update 28 August 2012: See comments below for links to photos taken by Lynn Cook, an EA reader in Australia, who tried our recipe with excellent results!
http://eatingasia.typepad.com/eatingasia/2012/07/diy-dried-salt-fish.html
This is exactly what I've been looking for, especially ever since I had a "dream" that said something like, "you need to find a place in here to dry fish".  Besides the obvious lesson of learning how to dry fish, I think I also learned that "water levels will be way up".

Thanks so much for posting, Barb, as none of the sites I read were exactly what I was looking for.  I knew I had seen pics somewhere of the "olden days" when people would hang out salted fish to dry in the sun. 

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #125 on: February 26, 2017, 06:23:30 PM »
ilinda, that is so interesting, that you had a dream about finding a place to dry fish. I am glad if the recipe helps you. I need to memorize it and take it with me when I relocate..
Honestly I didn't give it a thought but something about Ekratz's post led me to the idea. Her area is near several waterways. As long as a person is near water they may as well spend part of their time fishing and drying the fish!

My idea is, if people have gone to their survival areas and have some time on their hands, they can fish, dry lots of fish, package it up good, keep it dry and use it as a survival resource. i saw a few recipes, so the salted fish can be reconstituted in soups, mixed with mashed potatoes to make fish cakes to fry, mixed with rice. Rice, flour, dried potatoes, dried vegetables are cheap staples so add to that a good supply of dried salted fish and you have something. :)

Sadly, it is possible some waterways or oceans or lakes might be polluted from various causes, during the passing of PX. So having a stash of fish would be good.

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #126 on: February 26, 2017, 06:27:22 PM »
I don't particularly enjoy the idea of fishing, hunting, slaughtering animals, etc. but I (would) be willing to do a lot of fishing and salting and fish drying if it meant my family in the future would have something to fall back on... Come to think of it, in a survival group that is one thing an old timer man or woman could do to contribute: Go fishing. :)
Staples:
Again, seems like a good idea to make sure one has lots of flour, oil, lots and lots of salt, dried potatoes, fishing gear, etc.
 

ilinda

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #127 on: February 27, 2017, 01:25:56 PM »
Like you, Yowbarb, I'm not a fisherperson.  However after my dream I realized two things:  1) I will probably have to learn to fish, and need to store/preserve that fish as the water will probably all come at once and then soon the waters may recede; and 2) many recent dreams tell me of the massive flooding,  including in my vicinity, and I have had one particular dream about my area being a drainage to the Mississippi River! 

Yes, it's true about the pollution of the waters, as well as aquatic life, but in an emergency, people tend to eat to survive, even if they think there might be mercury in the fish, etc.

In fact, just this morning I was reading in Mike Adam's book, Food Forensics that 90% of the mercury contamination in food is carried out of the body, if strawberries are eaten in the same time period, as strawberries are an excellent heavy metal chelator, especially if the toxic metal is in the digestive tract.  So now I suppose we'd better be drying strawberries as well!

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #128 on: March 04, 2017, 03:31:52 PM »

....Yes, it's true about the pollution of the waters, as well as aquatic life, but in an emergency, people tend to eat to survive, even if they think there might be mercury in the fish, etc.

In fact, just this morning I was reading in Mike Adam's book, Food Forensics that 90% of the mercury contamination in food is carried out of the body, if strawberries are eaten in the same time period, as strawberries are an excellent heavy metal chelator, especially if the toxic metal is in the digestive tract.  So now I suppose we'd better be drying strawberries as well!

ilinda, wow that is great info to know about the strawberries!

 

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