Author Topic: What to tell your children about Planet X  (Read 7644 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2011, 08:06:08 PM »
I have been lucky, my 15 year old daughter has taken everything I've taught and shown her very well. She's always been open minded and a free thinker since birth. She normally has nightmares after horror movies but didn't after she was exposed to all the truth. You just have to know your childrens mind state and work with it not against it. Children the younger they are the more open minded they will be.

Mistah Ceza

Mistah Ceza that is really wonderful it is working out well with your daughter. It is such a blessing when
the children listen to you and it is not such a battle.
You must be doing something right,
 :)
- Yowbarb

Mistah Ceza

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2011, 11:11:04 PM »
Thanks, I am really putting forth effort towards a smooth transition, if there is such a thing?....

Yowbarb

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2011, 05:30:43 AM »
Thanks, I am really putting forth effort towards a smooth transition, if there is such a thing?....

I know what you mean...
Best O' Luck,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2012, 08:39:22 AM »
Thanks, I am really putting forth effort towards a smooth transition, if there is such a thing?....

Mistah Ceza, where'd you go? If you are reading this maybe you can re-apply.
- Yowbarb

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2012, 12:44:14 PM »
I personally think if a child is young, (under 14) you need to be careful what you say as they are at such an impressional age, it could frighten them and give them nightmares, etc.  A better way is to be more nonchalant and approach it from an Emergency Preparedness Standpoint.  For instance, the Red Cross recently held an emergency preparedness meeting in my area and they had booths and literature to hand out.  Possibly you could contact them to find out when they will be holding a meeting about Preparedness and then take the children, and make a fun outing out of it.  Then you can "brainstorm" with them about what kinds of things you should include in a B.O.B. and what kind of food should you store in case the grocery stores are unable to open or when you cannot get there. Gradually,  one thing leads to another, like the family plan for if something happens like an earthquake, etc.  Slowly work into things, and give the child time to grasp the concept of things that may happen.  If a child is not easily frightened,  or are more mature than most his/her age, you can be a bit more specific.  The important thing to keep in mind is the fact that many adults are unable to even consider the possibility due to fear and promptly go into denial. I think this subject is best worked into slowly and carefully.

NativeMom72

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2013, 09:02:44 PM »
Hello All!

I read this thread and wanted to contribute--
Recently, I bought my 12 year old a fictional book for young adults, which he just stared reading, and it is titled, "Life As We Knew It: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 1" by Susan Beth Pfeffer first published in 2006. It is a part of a  "Last Survivors Trilogy".

The following is the a brief synopsis of the book:

Quote
Synopsis:
Miranda’s disbelief turns to fear in a split second when a meteor knocks the moon closer to the earth. How should her family prepare for the future when worldwide tsunamis wipe out the coasts, earthquakes rock the continents, and volcanic ash blocks out the sun? As summer turns to Arctic winter, Miranda, her two brothers, and their mother retreat to the unexpected safe haven of their sunroom, where they subsist on stockpiled food and limited water in the warmth of a wood-burning stove.
   Told in journal entries, this is the heart-pounding story of Miranda’s struggle to hold on to the most important resource of all—hope—in an increasingly desperate and unfamiliar world.

So far he likes it! I will post again once he finishes whether or not he recommends it for others in his age group.

~pB

“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

NativeMom72

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2013, 06:15:55 PM »
Hello All!

I know that I wrote that I was going to give an update once my son finished the book but after a couple of days, I asked him what he thought of the book. He is already on the third chapter and he really likes it! I asked him to describe the details of the story he had read so far and without giving too much away, all I can say is that this book sparked up a thoughtful conversation of "what if..." scenarios and "what to do..." if a major event happens.
I just ordered book 2 of the series :)

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2013, 08:43:39 AM »
Actually, it sounds like a book I myself would love to read.

R.R. Book

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2017, 06:25:59 PM »
Hi all,

Thank you for this thread Linda.  I have twin 20-year-old sons who grew up being home schooled and were exposed to a broad mixture of ideas, and who elected on their own to study the Book of Revelation in their late teens.  Still, although we enjoy frank discussions in our house, I find it helpful to keep the Planet X discussion to a minimum while involving the boys daily in the physical preparations.  The reason for not dwelling on it verbally is that the boys still have not yet experienced all the "firsts" of their young adult lives, such as their first time living away from home, their first love, etc.  They are positive and calm boys who make friends easily, but I sense a hint of sadness as they seem to know organically that their lives may take a very different turn than the general expectation among their peers.  Together we have recently also come to the realization that all their hard work on their college degrees, which they began part-time at age 16, may be permanently interrupted by what is incoming.

This past December, as first photographs of the PX system began to appear online, I sat down with the boys and helped them to create a list of danger zones within a certain radius of our area (the beach, the city...) where young people are naturally attracted at this age.  A plan was agreed upon for the boys to intensively visit the danger zones with their peers during the winter while things were still calm, and then to gradually retract from the danger zones over the next weeks and months as they concentrate upon fun activities closer to safety. 

I scrape aside a little fund each week to take the family out to different diners, which helps to keep us positive.  The boys tolerate playing verbal survival games, such as quizzing one another on various topics.  They earn money helping me prep, and I give them bonuses such as a little extra fund to fill an old popcorn tin full of non-perishable treats to set aside for hard times.  They have adopted an "aware" widowed neighbor as their "grandmother" in lieu of an actual living one, and enjoy thinking of bringing her into our household once things start becoming rough.  They received their first set of fishing gear for Christmas, and are eager to learn how to help feed the family as well as their friends.

Many thanks also Marshall for the February posting on how to explain the Tribulation to young people.


Yowbarb

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2017, 12:56:44 PM »
Hi all,

Thank you for this thread Linda.  I have twin 20-year-old sons who grew up being home schooled and were exposed to a broad mixture of ideas, and who elected on their own to study the Book of Revelation in their late teens.  Still, although we enjoy frank discussions in our house, I find it helpful to keep the Planet X discussion to a minimum while involving the boys daily in the physical preparations.  The reason for not dwelling on it verbally is that the boys still have not yet experienced all the "firsts" of their young adult lives, such as their first time living away from home, their first love, etc.  They are positive and calm boys who make friends easily, but I sense a hint of sadness as they seem to know organically that their lives may take a very different turn than the general expectation among their peers.  Together we have recently also come to the realization that all their hard work on their college degrees, which they began part-time at age 16, may be permanently interrupted by what is incoming.

This past December, as first photographs of the PX system began to appear online, I sat down with the boys and helped them to create a list of danger zones within a certain radius of our area (the beach, the city...) where young people are naturally attracted at this age.  A plan was agreed upon for the boys to intensively visit the danger zones with their peers during the winter while things were still calm, and then to gradually retract from the danger zones over the next weeks and months as they concentrate upon fun activities closer to safety. 

I scrape aside a little fund each week to take the family out to different diners, which helps to keep us positive.  The boys tolerate playing verbal survival games, such as quizzing one another on various topics.  They earn money helping me prep, and I give them bonuses such as a little extra fund to fill an old popcorn tin full of non-perishable treats to set aside for hard times.  They have adopted an "aware" widowed neighbor as their "grandmother" in lieu of an actual living one, and enjoy thinking of bringing her into our household once things start becoming rough.  They received their first set of fishing gear for Christmas, and are eager to learn how to help feed the family as well as their friends.

Many thanks also Marshall for the February posting on how to explain the Tribulation to young people.
R.R. Book, thanks so much for adding to this Topic.
You sound like a really wonderful mother!
Please continue to share your ideas here... you are needed,
Barb Townsend

Yowbarb

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2017, 12:59:24 PM »
Hello All!

I know that I wrote that I was going to give an update once my son finished the book but after a couple of days, I asked him what he thought of the book. He is already on the third chapter and he really likes it! I asked him to describe the details of the story he had read so far and without giving too much away, all I can say is that this book sparked up a thoughtful conversation of "what if..." scenarios and "what to do..." if a major event happens.
I just ordered book 2 of the series :)

~pB

NativeMom72, how  did I miss your posts here? :)
Great stuff.
Let us know how it went with your boys and appreciation of that book.
Appreciating all you do, both on the Town Hall and off.
- Barb Townsend

ilinda

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Re: What to tell your children about Planet X
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2017, 03:19:01 PM »
Hi all,

Thank you for this thread Linda.  I have twin 20-year-old sons who grew up being home schooled and were exposed to a broad mixture of ideas, and who elected on their own to study the Book of Revelation in their late teens.  Still, although we enjoy frank discussions in our house, I find it helpful to keep the Planet X discussion to a minimum while involving the boys daily in the physical preparations.  The reason for not dwelling on it verbally is that the boys still have not yet experienced all the "firsts" of their young adult lives, such as their first time living away from home, their first love, etc.  They are positive and calm boys who make friends easily, but I sense a hint of sadness as they seem to know organically that their lives may take a very different turn than the general expectation among their peers.  Together we have recently also come to the realization that all their hard work on their college degrees, which they began part-time at age 16, may be permanently interrupted by what is incoming.

This past December, as first photographs of the PX system began to appear online, I sat down with the boys and helped them to create a list of danger zones within a certain radius of our area (the beach, the city...) where young people are naturally attracted at this age.  A plan was agreed upon for the boys to intensively visit the danger zones with their peers during the winter while things were still calm, and then to gradually retract from the danger zones over the next weeks and months as they concentrate upon fun activities closer to safety. 

I scrape aside a little fund each week to take the family out to different diners, which helps to keep us positive.  The boys tolerate playing verbal survival games, such as quizzing one another on various topics.  They earn money helping me prep, and I give them bonuses such as a little extra fund to fill an old popcorn tin full of non-perishable treats to set aside for hard times.  They have adopted an "aware" widowed neighbor as their "grandmother" in lieu of an actual living one, and enjoy thinking of bringing her into our household once things start becoming rough.  They received their first set of fishing gear for Christmas, and are eager to learn how to help feed the family as well as their friends.

Many thanks also Marshall for the February posting on how to explain the Tribulation to young people.
Welcome to the TH, R. R.

I especially enjoyed reading how you are dealing with educating your twins.  And it is nice to know that the "surrogate grandmother" is treated as a blood relative.  It sounds like you are preparing for a rainy day in the best way possible.  Congratulations, and we hope to read more from you these days.