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Author Topic: what is 'survival food' / what to think of  (Read 14809 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #135 on: December 05, 2017, 02:43:04 PM »
Quote
I kept eyeing up a cedar tree to climb in case a hog got out.

 :D



How cute! :)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #136 on: December 05, 2017, 05:08:48 PM »
Admittedly the matching parasol may have been a bit much for farm attire   :D
When I climb Cedar for our "conference", will get a shot or two from up there, maybe even a selfie.  Without parasol.

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #137 on: December 05, 2017, 05:21:02 PM »
Before anyone thinks hunting wild hogs is easy, check out the article:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/9f20d3f3-5278-375e-9769-40747d4c01e6/ss_wild-boar-turns-the-tables-on.html


R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #138 on: December 05, 2017, 05:34:54 PM »
Quote
When I climb Cedar for our "conference", will get a shot or two from up there, maybe even a selfie.  Without parasol.

 :D

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #139 on: December 06, 2017, 01:12:53 PM »
Before anyone thinks hunting wild hogs is easy, check out the article:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/9f20d3f3-5278-375e-9769-40747d4c01e6/ss_wild-boar-turns-the-tables-on.html

I believe it!! Pigs, hogs known to be the most intelligent land animal.
Armed with those tusks, wow, watch out.
I would imagine the males are protective of the group...
Years ago my husband (now ex) went wild boar hunting somewhere in CA. He said it was really dangerous.

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #140 on: December 06, 2017, 04:41:34 PM »
Before anyone thinks hunting wild hogs is easy, check out the article:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/9f20d3f3-5278-375e-9769-40747d4c01e6/ss_wild-boar-turns-the-tables-on.html

I believe it!! Pigs, hogs known to be the most intelligent land animal.
Armed with those tusks, wow, watch out.
I would imagine the males are protective of the group...
Years ago my husband (now ex) went wild boar hunting somewhere in CA. He said it was really dangerous.

I'm way more afraid of encountering wild hogs/boars than mountain lion or bear.  One lone hog is usually just opportunistically foraging, but a large group of them, on a dark and lonely night is an extremely scary proposition!  And if you see any, don't trip or fall on your way to your tree or fence.  They'll be on you in a heartbeat, as you're "down" and fair game.

We know of a guy working in a hog slaughterhouse, who tripped on the slimy floor, and the hogs were on him lickety-split, and they had eaten the flesh from his leg, all the way to the bone in the few seconds it took for co-workers to rescue him.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #141 on: December 06, 2017, 05:06:54 PM »
This must be the exception, not the rule, from your warning:


Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #142 on: January 30, 2018, 11:05:57 AM »
....However, when you're talking survival IT'S ALL ABOUT CALORIES.

In a survival situation you don't care where you're getting your energy from. All you know is that you need it (to survive). If that energy is environmentally unfriendly or even unhealthy, all of that becomes moot in survival situations.

I have learned that the best diet is one based on carbohydrates. HOWEVER, carbohydrates contain the LEAST amount of calories (i.e. talking about fats and proteins besides). Fats contain the most calories.
....
Now, obviously, 'survival' can be about getting through a tough 72 hours, a tough 72 days or a tough 72 months...
I'm mostly talking about short-term challenges when i say it's really only about calories. One can get on to the myriad of other considerations after food sources and safety have been established and safe-guarded. But I myself have in the past mixed up my priorities and focused on healthy foods mainly. Unfortunately, the healthiest foods generally contain the least amount of calories. It has been a dilemma for me but the important thing is that you don't let it be a dilemma for yourself in a pinch. Then you just go for the fats.
(LOL; i was just watching Discovery Channel and they showed albatrosses feeding their young. Guess what they give them? They reurgitate an oil that has as many calories as diesel oil! That's what these chicks live off of.)

Socrates, I quoted parts of your first post in this Topic.
This is to reiterate, to emphasize how much I agree with you on your ideas about calories.

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #143 on: January 31, 2018, 07:49:23 AM »
....However, when you're talking survival IT'S ALL ABOUT CALORIES.

In a survival situation you don't care where you're getting your energy from. All you know is that you need it (to survive). If that energy is environmentally unfriendly or even unhealthy, all of that becomes moot in survival situations.

I have learned that the best diet is one based on carbohydrates. HOWEVER, carbohydrates contain the LEAST amount of calories (i.e. talking about fats and proteins besides). Fats contain the most calories.
....
Now, obviously, 'survival' can be about getting through a tough 72 hours, a tough 72 days or a tough 72 months...
I'm mostly talking about short-term challenges when i say it's really only about calories. One can get on to the myriad of other considerations after food sources and safety have been established and safe-guarded. But I myself have in the past mixed up my priorities and focused on healthy foods mainly. Unfortunately, the healthiest foods generally contain the least amount of calories. It has been a dilemma for me but the important thing is that you don't let it be a dilemma for yourself in a pinch. Then you just go for the fats.
(LOL; i was just watching Discovery Channel and they showed albatrosses feeding their young. Guess what they give them? They reurgitate an oil that has as many calories as diesel oil! That's what these chicks live off of.)

Socrates, I quoted parts of your first post in this Topic.
This is to reiterate, to emphasize how much I agree with you on your ideas about calories.

Here is some food for thought:

If you were in a survival situation and had two choices of seven meals for a week, at one meal per day, and one of these meal choices was 1,000 calories worth of white sugar, while the other was 500 calories worth of mixed pumpkin and sunflower seeds, which would you choose?   

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Root Cellaring Year 'Round Now
« Reply #144 on: February 04, 2018, 12:26:33 PM »
Up until now, we would fill up baskets and boxes of certain "keeping" produce in the root cellar in the autumn, which didn't spoil easily and would last us until the first harvest of spring which would bring us greens and then strawberries.

With recent MSM announcements of the coming pole shift, it may be time to rethink the seasonality of this plan and begin keeping our baskets and crates topped off even if it means doing so by purchasing the "keepers" from the store, while they are still available.  In other words, if we want to avoid disruptions in our access to fresh foods, and if we want to avoid strictly eating out of a can, we may want to be proactive and disregard the fact that at this time of year these items will be imports for many of us in the Northern Hemisphere.  Those "Down Under" may want to practice the same new habit in advance of their own winter.

As a reminder of what to look for:

Tart apples (Granny Smith, etc.), acorn squash, butternut squash, cabbage, onions, garlic, potatoes, sunchokes, mushroom bed, carrots in a crate of soil or sawdust, pumpkins when available again.  Outer leaves of the cabbages may brown, but the inner cabbage head should remain green (or purple).

Categories that lend themselves to this: winter curcubits (the hard squashes), brassicas that don't yellow quickly, bulb alliums, root veggies, and some hard fruits.

They will last longer in storage if kept cool (except for pumpkins which like to be warm) and if stacked in such a way that air is allowed to circulate.  Some, but not all, hard squash may grow a white fuzzy mold on the rind.  This can be prevented by a dilute bleach or alcohol dip and then drying in the sun or on a towel before storing.

Other ideas?



« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 01:24:10 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Salt-packing Meats
« Reply #145 on: February 04, 2018, 01:20:29 PM »
I've heard, of course, of brining or preserving meats in saline, or smoking them, but here is a technique that sounds both simple and nutritious: dry salt packing (same thing as "corning").

There is no recipe as with brining: simply rinse any cut of raw meat and then coat it so thickly with salt that none is exposed or can touch the sides of the container.  It can be shelved or hung to dry in an environment of above freezing and below 60 degrees F.   If cold canning it afterwards, avoid using canning jars with metal lids. 

This article says that the effect of using sea salt is "hypermineralizing" your food by absorption:
http://longtermstoragefood.com/?p=74

There seems to be a debate over whether to use coarse or fine salt, with coarse salt being traditional (perhaps as it would survive the moisure of the "leachate" that exudes before drying is completed) but fine salt perhaps making better contact with the meat.

Here is a thread journaling one person's experience over a period of days with the process.  First he coated his meat thickly with salt in a tub, then allowed fluids to drain off, then the meat dried up and became cured.  He reported that there was never a spoilage smell or appearance.  The big drawbacks would seem to be the cost of so much salt (if using sea salt), and the amount wasted in the tub.  One pound of salt to 30# meat is recommended.  A discussion is included in the thread about whether to give the waste material to livestock.
https://permies.com/t/5326/kitchen/Dry-Salt-Cures-Meat

One would rinse off the salt well, in advance of using the meat. 

I wonder if this might be the answer to concerns about CWD in deer meat?

Thoughts?

More links:
https://modernsurvivalblog.com/survival-kitchen/curing-meat-by-dry-salting-or-with-a-salt-brine/



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt-cured_meat

http://www.mortonsalt.com/article/meat-curing-methods/

https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/drying/salting-meat-ze0z1511zdeh

https://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/nchfp/lit_rev/cure_smoke_cure.html



« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 08:39:58 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Root Cellaring Year 'Round Now
« Reply #146 on: February 05, 2018, 07:35:11 PM »

They will last longer in storage if kept cool (except for pumpkins which like to be warm) and if stacked in such a way that air is allowed to circulate. 


Now I understand why my pumpkins are rotting so fast!  They were stored in a very cold room, so a few days  ago I moved the remainder out to main area, just to save them.  The Yamiken squash can tolerate cold storage, so I assumed pumpkin would also.   Thanks for that info.!

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #147 on: February 06, 2018, 03:18:35 AM »
Thanks for letting me know how the Yamiken likes to be stored!  :)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #148 on: February 06, 2018, 07:19:27 PM »
Thanks for letting me know how the Yamiken likes to be stored!  :)
In fact the Yamiken can also be stored at room temperature, like in the 70's.  They are very flexible in their storage requirements.  I will know within a few months if that really cold storage temp. harmed them, but so far they look intact, whereas the pumpkins began forming black spots that enlarged, and rotted, and the stems fell off.  Oh, what a mess.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #149 on: February 07, 2018, 04:58:13 AM »
What a nutritious mess for the compost heap to make soil with though! :)

 

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