Author Topic: Fermenting Foods  (Read 4844 times)

Linda

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Fermenting Foods
« on: April 06, 2010, 06:39:02 AM »
"The process of fermenting foods to preserve them and to make them more digestible and more nutritious is as old as humanity." Fermented foods are a powerful aid to digestion and a protection against disease.

Learning the art of fermentation can be a lifesaver if we have no refrigeration and or fresh foods. This would be a great source of nutrition. Captain James Cook, the eighteenth century English explorer, was recognized for having conquered scurvy (vitamin C deficiency) among his crews by sailing with large quantities of sauerkraut. On his second round the world voyage, in the 1770's, sixty barrels of kraut lasted for twenty-seven months, and not a single crew member developed scurvy, which previously had killed huge numbers of the crews of long sea voyages.

I don't plan on a long sea voyage, but any length of time living without our conveniences and we will be in trouble food wise. We need to learn to create nutrient dense foods if we are to survive in a healthy state.

I first started with fermented pickles, kombucha tea, fermented beet drink, and keifer. These all have their own nutritional  qualities.
I would be happy to share how to's with anyone that is interested.

Books: Wild fermentation, author Sandor Ellix Katz
          Nourishing Traditions, author, Sally Fallon
          Preserving Food without freezing or canning, author. The Gardeners & Farmers of Terre Vivante
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 07:38:06 AM »
Linda I am very glad you brought up this concept.
Fermenting of foods is a very ancient human practice and practically lost. A good thing to learn.

The Japanese have been making fermented soybean soysauce (Tamari) and
the fermented rice and/or soy or wheat paste called miso (as you know.)

Regarding the saurkraut I notice when I have a little bit of fermented foods such as
saurkraut in my diet, I feel better. I think it strengthens the digestion and probably brings a concentration
of minerals, too.
Used to have the tamari and miso almost daily... a good idea to have some.

Thanks,
Yowbarb
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 07:40:25 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 07:39:10 AM »
I used to make the kombucha tea too. I moved a few too many times and sort of got out
of the habit. When I was doing that, I noticed some relief from allergies.
Yowbarb

Linda

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2010, 09:40:40 AM »
I know Barb, somehow we get busy in life and we get out of practice doing things. I just made a batch of Kombucha and flavored it with dark sweet cherries, dang it is tasty!
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2010, 03:11:49 PM »
I know Barb, somehow we get busy in life and we get out of practice doing things. I just made a batch of Kombucha and flavored it with dark sweet cherries, dang it is tasty!

That sounds really great!

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2012, 10:48:58 AM »
http://www.soya.be/make-miso.php   Make miso

"Not many people make miso at home because it’s a very lengthy process and requires some experience. Nevertheless we will try to explain how to make miso at home.

Ingredients for home made miso
To make miso you need the following ingredients:
400 g whole soybeans
600 ml water
150 g salt
300 g dried rice koji (rice fermented with special moulds, this can be bought are also made at home)

Miso production process
All utensils which you use for the production of miso should be clean and preferably be rinsed with boiling water. These are the steps to make miso at home:
Soaking the soybeans - Soak the soybeans during 3 hours in the water. By that time the soybeans should have doubled in size.

Cooking the soybeans - Put the soaked beans with the soaking water in a pressure cooker and cook at max pressure during 40 minutes. The soybeans should be soft. Open the pressure cooker and drain the beans in a colander, making sure to recover the soaking water.If you don't have a pressure cooker you will need to boil for about 3 to 4 hours to obtain soft soybeans.

Mixing the soybeans - When the beans are still hot, use a potato masher to puree the beans until about one third of the soybeans is still whole. Allow he beans to cool down to 35-40°C. If temperature is too high the koji culture could become inactive.

Making miso paste - Take 200 ml of the soaking water (add more water if you don’t have enough of it) and dissolve the salt (except for 2 teaspoon salt which you need in the following step). Add this liquid slowly to the soybeans while mixing stirring continuously. Crumble the koji into the miso mixture and with your clean hands mix until you obtain a smooth mixture.

Preparation of miso container - As a fermentation vat use a glazed ceramic cylindrical container of about 5 kg. Make sure that the ceramic container is suitable for food preparations. Rub the inside of the container with 1 teaspoon of salt and add the miso mixture. Level the miso surface and sprinkle 1 teaspoon of salt, this to prevent unwanted moulds and bacteria from spoiling the surface which is in contact with the air. Cover the miso with a round piece of kitchen paper and press it firmly on the miso. Top with a round wooden lid that just fits in the container and some weights (about 3 kg, well washed stones). Cover the container with wrapping paper and tie in place with a string or rubber. Repeat all steps as before to make more batches in the following days and add them to the container (first removing lid and rubbing the inside of the container with about 1 teaspoon salt) until the container is about 80% full.

Miso fermentation - The fermentation will start immediately. The container should be place in a clean room with moderate temperatures (15°C – 25°C). The miso will be ready after 6 to 12 months fermentation. During the fermentation some liquid (=tamari) will rice to the surface. If no liquid tamari is seen on the surface then the pressing weight must be increased.
Each time you want to inspect the fermentation process you will loose quality, so don’t do it when not necessary and not more frequently then once every 2 months. This miso can be kept in the container for a few years.
Traditional Japanese miso production
In Japan miso was traditionally produced in small miso shops. Each miso shop used its own unique process and has its own secrets. Before one can make miso he needs to be educated by a miso master during several years. Typical for these miso shops is that the soybeans are cooked in containers on open fires, that miso is fermented in wooden vats and that no motorized equipment is used. These days there’s a lot of competition from big modern miso factories. Due to optimized fermentation conditions the miso is ready after months instead of years. In Japan most miso produced will end up as miso soup.

....

Survival101

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Do you make/drink Kefir, do you have any stored away for the future?
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2013, 08:20:33 AM »

I'm always looking for opportunities to teach people about the wonderful benefits of drinking and using Kefir, to make it themselves and to always have a batch 'brewing', whenever possible and that's pretty easy to accomplish. One of the first tasks, I have new Kefir users do very soon on and as soon as they have an excess of milk or water grains, is to dehydrate them. This purpose can be to save for someone else in the future, to have as barter goods or most important, a replacement, if something would happen to your 'working' batch and you'd be out. It is always smart to have at least one 'backup' method or more of anything/everything, stashed away to have for yourself and family/community, ready when needed.

How to Dehydrate Dairy Kefir Grains
Next week in the Fundamentals eCourse, we turn to making dairy kefir. This is one of my favorite real foods, hands down. You probably know that because I talk about it all the time. I have a plethora of grains; I’ve been raising them up to share with eCourse members. However, I couldn’t raise enough because the eCourse is quite full.

But back to those dairy kefir grains. I asked Julie at Cultures for Health how to dehydrate them, because I figured they’d ship much more easily if they weren’t wet. She gave me very simple instructions, and that’s the point of my post today.

Why Dehydrate Kefir Grains?
You might wonder why’d you want to dehydrate water kefir grains. For one, if you want to ship them.  But two, and much more personally practical, you should dehydrate grains as backup cultures for the future. Perhaps your raw milk source dries up and you need to save grains for when milk is in season again.

I’ve read that grains don’t all revive (one source said 40% viability), so it is a good idea to put back several kefir grains. Dehydrating is not the only way to put back grains, though. You can keep grains in the refrigerator in a small amount of milk that you change weekly, or you can freeze grains as-is (wet). Finally, and the topic of this post, you can dehydrate them.

How To Dehydrate Kefir Grains
Rinse the grains thoroughly with good water: Well water or mineral-rich spring water. Don’t use chlorinated city water. Water from a filter is okay, even though it strips out minerals; as minerals are not so much of a concern for making the grains dormant. Lay out to drip off on a clean towel or paper towel.
 
Lay the grains on a piece of unbleached parchment paper, cover with a loose paper towel (to keep dust off), and dry at room temperature until they are hard and yellowish. Or use an Excalibur dehydrator at the lowest temperature. The ParaFlexx sheets will work, too. I chose to use parchment paper, because I knew it was sterile. Turn the dial to where it barely turns on. According to Julie, this is the perfect temperature.
 
Drying time will be 3 to 5 days for the largest grains; smaller grains will be done sooner. Store in cool storage, the refrigerator, or freezer when dry.
 
They look much smaller now, don’t they? Yellowish — no, quite yellow! — and all shriveled up. Tomorrow, many of them will be off to eCourse members.

Wondering now, if kefir is for you?

Source: http://gnowfglins.com/2010/04/27/how-to-dehydrate-dkefir-grains/#

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 08:25:23 AM »
OMG!  I LOVE Kefir.  And it is so good for you  Thank you for this great post.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2013, 03:59:52 PM »
OMG!  I LOVE Kefir.  And it is so good for you  Thank you for this great post.

You are right, it is good for you.  :)

Survival101

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2013, 11:38:34 AM »

Here's another idea that's useful and I didn't know could be done...

Dehydrating Your Sourdough Starter
 
When people get curious about baking with a sourdough starter and I explain how it works, I can tell they are a little freaked out by this idea of keeping the culture alive, day-in, day-out, forever and ever.

"This is too much responsibility," they say, followed by variations on "This is why I don't have kids!" or "Houseplants all die under my care!" and "What about my trip to Marrakech?"

I understand the sentiment, so I'm always quick to point out that a sourdough starter can be kept in the fridge for a little while without the skies caving in, and that if "a little while" becomes "indefinitely", you can always dehydrate the precious blob into a dormant matter that won't require regular attention.

This is a handy procedure if you're about to go through a period of time when you won't be able to care for it consistently or bake with it, but also if you'd like to share your sourdough culture with a friend who lives far away, and also if you're smart and want a backup copy to restore in the event that your live starter has a disk failure (i.e. dies).

It's very easy, and requires no special equipment.
First, you'll need to feed your starter a few hours beforehand, so that it's at its peak ripeness when you start dehydrating it -- in other words, you want it to contain a maximum number of live micro-organisms.

Plop two tablespoonfuls of the starter onto a sheet of parchment paper or a clean silicon baking mat, and use a flexible spatula to spread it as thinly as you can all over the sheet.

Place the sheet on a cooling rack (for maximum air circulation) and set aside in a warm (but not too warm) spot of the house until completely dry and crackly. Depending on the hydration of your starter, the thickness of the spread, and the weather, this could take anywhere from a few hours to a day.

Break the dehydrated starter into pieces, place in a freezer bag and crush into smaller flakes with a rolling pin. Transfer to a small jar, close tightly, and keep somewhere cool and dry until ready to rehydrate. Theoretically, it should keep for years and years, though I've only tested it for a few months myself.

To rehydrate, place about 10 grams (1/3 ounce) of the dehydrated starter flakes in a straight-sided jar and cover with the same weight in fresh water. Let stand for 10 minutes to soften, then stir to dissolve. Feed with the same weight of flour and water, as described here, and repeat daily until the starter is back on its feet, bubbling and rising in its jar.

Source: http://chocolateandzucchini.com/archives/2011/02/dehydrating_your_sourdough_starter.php

Yowbarb

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2013, 12:50:36 PM »
Survival101 -that's a great idea!
Thanks for posting on how to dehydrate sourdough starter!
- Yowbarb

ilinda

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Re: Fermenting Foods
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2017, 05:00:52 PM »
Am posting this here, just because the topic is relevant, and I'm still trying to find the original thread where this would go.  In the meantime.....


Been trying for over 10 minutes to find the article  I had promised to post, then did post, now cannot find it!!!  It was a continuation of our discussion of yogurt, kefir, buttermilk, etc., and how it all began, i.e., how we can, if necessary, start our culturing all over again.  Well just days after that, I saw an article (think Synchronicity) on internet about how the nomadic tribes made a fermented product from horses' milk and carried it in an animal skin/animal intestine, to keep it, and discovered in the process that the probiotics in the intestinal tissue converted their milk into a different product.

I had not known about the horses' milk, but had read years ago about how yak herdsmen would do something similar with yak milk, storing it in an animal intestine (cleaned, but not totally devoid of the good bacteria), and ending up with yak butter, etc.  In fact, one can envision taking whole yak milk, fresh from the yak mom, and putting it in the animal intestine vessel, then placing that vessel/container on a horse or yak, and allowing it to be jostled around for hours on end, and at a temperature of 80-100 deg. F.  Soon there would be fermemtation, then the fat, being jostled cnstantly, might actually turn to butter at the top of the container, above the yogurt, or if the fat does not rise as does cow's milk fat, then one might have butter blobs throughout the yogurt.

Well, if I find the article again, will re-post, and maybe in several places.