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Author Topic: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included  (Read 13301 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2013, 06:45:34 PM »

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2013, 02:48:52 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

TRIPLE CONJUNCTION OF PLANETS:
Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury are converging for a beautiful sunset conjunction. The show begins on May 11th and climaxes two weeks later.
Get the full story   http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2013/10may_sunsettriangle/

and a video          http://youtu.be/YPthe9e-T18

from Science@NASA.

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2013, 07:02:16 AM »
Yowbarb an announcement made the 14th Bright New Nova In Delphinus — You can See it Tonight With Binoculars by Bob King on August 14, 2013  How far away it is or if it is valuable info  - I don’t know yet.
Update will be in the following post.

...
Bright New Nova In Delphinus — You can See it Tonight With Binoculars
by Bob King on August 14, 2013

http://www.universetoday.com/104103/bright-new-nova-in-delphinus-you-can-see-it-tonight-with-binoculars/
 
Bright New Nova In Delphinus — You can See it Tonight With Binoculars
by Bob King on August 14, 2013

Looking around for something new to see in your binoculars or telescope tonight? How about an object whose name literally means “new”. Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki of Yamagata discovered an apparent nova or “new star” in the constellation Delphinus the Dolphin just today, August 14. He used a small 7-inch (.18-m) reflecting telescope and CCD camera to nab it. Let’s hope its mouthful of a temporary designation, PNVJ20233073+2046041, is soon changed to Nova Delphini 2013!

Several hours later it was confirmed as a new object shining at magnitude 6.8 just under the naked eye limit. This is bright especially considering that nothing was visible at the location down to a dim 13th magnitude only a day before discovery. How bright it will get is hard to know yet, but variable star observer Patrick Schmeer of Germany got his eyes on it this evening and estimated the new object at magnitude 6.0. That not only puts it within easy reach of all binoculars but right at the naked eye limit for observers under dark skies. Wow! Since it appears to have been discovered on day one of the outburst, my hunch is that it will brighten even further.

The only way to know is to go out for a look. I’ve prepared a couple charts you can use to help you find and follow our new guest. The charts show stars down to about 9th magnitude, the limit for 50mm binoculars under dark skies. The numbers on the chart are magnitudes (with decimals omitted, thus 80 = 8.0 magnitude) so you can approximate its brightness and follow the ups and downs of the star’s behavior in the coming nights.

Despite the name, a nova is not truly new but an explosion on a star otherwise too faint for anyone to have noticed.  A nova occurs in a close binary star system, where a small but extremely dense and massive (for its size) white dwarf  grabs hydrogen gas from its closely orbiting companion. After swirling about in a disk around the dwarf, it’s funneled down to the star’s 150,000 degree F surface where gravity compacts and heats the gas until it detonates like a bazillion thermonuclear bombs. Suddenly, a faint star that wasn’t on anyone’s radar vaults a dozen magnitudes to become a standout “new star”.

Novae can rise in brightness from 7 to 16 magnitudes, the equivalent of 50,000 to 100,000 times brighter than the sun, in just a few days. Meanwhile the gas they expel in the blast travels away from the binary at up to 2,000 miles per second. This one big boom! Unlike a supernova explosion, the star survives, perhaps to “go nova” again someday.

This map shows Delphinus and Sagitta, both of which are near the bright star Altair at the bottom of the Summer Triangle. You can star hop from the top of Delphinus to the star 29 Vulpeculae and from there to the nova.  Or you can point your binoculars midway between Eta Sagittae and 29 Vul. The “5.7 star” is magnitude 5.7. Stellarium

Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/104103/bright-new-nova-in-delphinus-you-can-see-it-tonight-with-binoculars/#ixzz2cEcI0oOZ

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2013, 07:06:14 AM »
http://www.universetoday.com/104192/update-on-the-bright-nova-delphini-2013-plus-a-gallery-of-images-from-our-readers/#ixzz2cEFoghzO

Update on the Bright Nova Delphini 2013; Plus a Gallery of Images from our Readers

by Nancy Atkinson on August 16, 2013

Since showing itself on August 14, 2013, a bright nova in the constellation Delphinus — now officially named Nova Delphini 2013 — has brightened even more. As of this writing, the nova is at magnitude 4.4 to 4.5, meaning that for the first time in years, there is a nova visible to the naked eye — if you have a dark enough sky. Even better, use binoculars or a telescope to see this “new star” in the sky.

The nova was discovered by Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagak. When first spotted, it was at about magnitude 6, but has since brightened. Here’s the light curve of the nova from the AAVSO (American Association of Variable Star Observers) and they’ve also provided a binocular sequence chart, too.

How and where to see the new nova? Below is a great graphic showing exactly where to look in the sky. Additionally, we’ve got some great shots from Universe Today readers around the world who have managed to capture stunning shots of Nova Delpini 2013. You can see more graphics and more about the discovery of the nova on our original ‘breaking news’ article by Bob King.

If you aren’t able to see the nova for yourself, there are a few online observing options:

The Virtual Star Party team, led by UT’s publisher Fraser Cain, will try to get a view during the next VSP, at Sunday night on Google+ — usually at this time of year, about 10 pm EDT/0200 UTC on Monday mornings. If you’d like a notification for when it’s happening, make sure you subscribe to the Universe Today channel on YouTube.

The Virtual Telescope Project, based in Italy, will have an online observing session on August 19, 2013 at 20:00 UTC, and you can join astronomer Gianluca Masi at this link.

The Slooh online telescope had an observing session yesterday (which you can see here), and we’ll post an update if they plan any additional viewing sessions.

There’s no way to predict if the nova will remain bright for a few days more, and unfortunately the Moon is getting brighter and bigger in the sky (it will be full on August 20), so take the opportunity this weekend if you can to try and see the new nova.

Now, enjoy more images from Universe Today readers:

Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/104192/update-on-the-bright-nova-delphini-2013-plus-a-gallery-of-images-from-our-readers/#ixzz2cFN4QMSK
......

« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 10:13:46 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2013, 05:01:55 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

SUNSET PLANETS:  When the sun goes down tonight, step outside and look southwest. The crescent Moon and Venus are gathering for a wide but beautiful conjunction. Denis Crute sends this picture from Parkes, NSW, Australia.

 

 


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 SPACECRAFT GOES INTO LUNAR ORBIT:  Mission controllers flying NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft are among the select few at the space agency who have exemptions allowing them to work during the government shutdown. On the morning of Oct. 6th, they fired LADEE's main engine in a braking maneuver. This slowed the spacecraft enough for it to be captured by the Moon's gravity. The insertion burn went flawlessly and LADEE is now in lunar orbit. Two more main engine burns, on Oct. 9th and 12th, will adjust LADEE's trajectory, settling it into its commissioning orbit. LADEE is on a mission to study the exotic and diaphanous lunar atmosphere, which is mightily affected by space weather. 

 SUNSET PLANETS:  When the sun goes down tonight, step outside and look southwest. The crescent Moon and Venus are gathering for a wide but beautiful conjunction. Denis Crute sends this picture from Parkes, NSW, Australia:



"What a nice view just after sunset," says Crute."This picture is a 2 second exposure @ ISO 1600."

Tonight and tomorrow, the crescent Moon will pass by Venus, forming a bright duo visible long before the sky fades to black. Also, be alert for Earthshine--a ghostly glow illuminating the crescent's dark terrain. Earthshine is sunlight reflected from our own planet onto the Moon. A crescent Moon with Earthshine framed by twilight blue is one of the most beautiful sights in the heavens. Don't miss it! Sky maps: Oct. 7, Oct. 8. [ pages don't work for some reason.]
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2014, 12:12:37 PM »
Can only read this article apparently after subscribing.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/skytel

The Red Planet Approaches
   Mars doubles in brightness during the month of March.
By Fred Schaaf   

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2014, 01:46:46 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/
APPROACHING MARS:

Mars
Taken by Maximilian Teodorescu on March 14, 2014 @ Dumitrana (Ilfov), Romania

SEE this photo full-sized at this link:  http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=95532





enlightenme

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2014, 06:02:47 PM »
Excellent!!  Thanks Barb!

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2014, 11:22:24 AM »
Excellent!!  Thanks Barb!

I'm not sure if I saw it or not. I was watching what I thought was Mars just E of SE and another reddish but not as red object what I thought was due east in the night sky...

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2014, 04:32:04 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

RED MARS, BLUE SPICA, BIG ASTEROIDS
.....................................................
Photo:
Mars And Its Two Companions
Taken by  by Jimmy Westlake on March 19, 2014 @ Stagecoach, Colorado, USA

Click here for full image: http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=95678

enlightenme

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2014, 05:04:10 AM »
Thanks Barb!  Excellent post and picture, I really liked the pic with the description!  Excellent!!  ;) :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2014, 05:13:25 AM »
Thanks Barb!  Excellent post and picture, I really liked the pic with the description!  Excellent!!  ;) :)

Ironic how it looks like the red and blue kachinas...

enlightenme

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2014, 05:25:45 AM »
Thanks Barb!  Excellent post and picture, I really liked the pic with the description!  Excellent!!  ;) :)

Ironic how it looks like the red and blue kachinas...

Yes!!  Indeed it does!

Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2014, 03:36:34 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

A NEW MOON NAMED 'PEGGY': NASA's Cassini spacecraft has photographed a small icy object forming at the edge of Saturn's rings. Informally named "Peggy," it may be a new moon caught in the act of genesis. Get the full story from Science@NASA.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/14apr_newmoon/

Possible New Moon Forming Around Saturn

April 14, 2014: NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn. Informally named "Peggy," the object may be a new moon. Details of the observations were published online today by the journal Icarus.

"We have not seen anything like this before," said Carl Murray of Queen Mary University of London, and the report's lead author. "We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right."


Yowbarb

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Re: Stars and planets to view - some new discoveries included
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2014, 11:43:07 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

MORNING PLANETS: Up before sunrise? Step outside and look east. The crescent Moon is passing close to Venus in the pre-dawn sky on April 25th and 26th. It's a beautiful way to start the day


 

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