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Author Topic: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US  (Read 5218 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2015, 10:44:07 PM »
Temperature extremes in the US...

http://youtu.be/ROc5kZZ-bPo

Yowbarb

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2015, 09:53:41 AM »
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/02/19/arctic-outbreak-shatters-records-in-eastern-u-s-coldest-yet-to-come/

It’s all connected — while the eastern U.S. freezes, Alaska is surging to more than 40 degrees above normal for this time of year thanks to a strong ridge of high pressure over western North America. (weatherbell.com)

ilinda

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2015, 07:07:33 AM »
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/02/19/arctic-outbreak-shatters-records-in-eastern-u-s-coldest-yet-to-come/

It’s all connected — while the eastern U.S. freezes, Alaska is surging to more than 40 degrees above normal for this time of year thanks to a strong ridge of high pressure over western North America. (weatherbell.com)
Morning before last we saw our outdoor thermometer reading of -30 deg. F, and that was at 9 AM, so we don't know what the lowest temp. was, but from looking at this map I now see it wasn't just in our tiny little micro-climate.  Yikes, that polar vortex from the disturbed jet stream is really looping downward.  And we're only in February.

Thanks for that really informative map, Barb.

Yowbarb

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2015, 01:15:45 PM »
Yowbarb Note: I don't know yet if this heatwave is beyond the normal for this time of year. Anyway here is what's on weather.gov
...

Dangerous heat continues across parts of southern, eastern U.S.

The heat wave that has been gripping parts of the southern and eastern U.S. will continue on Monday, with heat index values as high as 100-110 degrees. Heat Advisories are in effect or will be in effect beginning this afternoon across the southern Plains and Southeast and across the mid-Atlantic, from the Carolinas to to the New York City metropolitan area. Take extra precautions if outside.
Read More...
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/heat/index.shtml

......

enlightenme

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2016, 03:46:56 AM »
Well just heard on the local news, it is official 2015 was the warmest year overall on record here in my area of  PA (which by the way, prior to that 2014 had been the warmest year on record), after having record breaking cold temps in the first quarter, Jan-March, we then had tremendous above average months through the entire rest of the year!  We haven't had a bit of snow, nor an ice storm yet this season.  I can't ever remember that scenario in all the years I have lived here in PA, which is over 40 years now... :)
Not that I'm truly complaining, the amount of money I'm saving on my heating bill is fantastic, will probably be able to fund a nice weekend at the Jersey shore this June!!  :D :D

http://wnep.com/weather/forecast/

enlightenme

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2016, 06:33:21 AM »
This is article is not mainly about the US, but seemed the best place to put it.  From The Washington Post:


Capital Weather Gang
Freak storm pushes North Pole 50 degrees above normal to melting point
Resize Text
Print Article
Comments 1591
By Angela Fritz December 30, 2015

This storm in the far North Atlantic is the same storm that caused two tornado outbreaks and widespread flooding in the United States. Now, it’s pushing temperatures at the North Pole well above average. (earth.nullschool.net)

This story has been updated to include buoy measurements that confirm the North Pole temperature climbed above 32 degrees on Wednesday.

A powerful winter cyclone — the same storm that led to two tornado outbreaks in the United States and disastrous river flooding — has driven the North Pole to the freezing point this week, 50 degrees above average for this time of year.

From Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, a mind-boggling pressure drop was recorded in Iceland: 54 millibars in just 18 hours. This triples the criteria for “bomb” cyclogenesis, which meteorologists use to describe a rapidly intensifying mid-latitude storm. A “bomb” cyclone is defined as dropping one millibar per hour for 24 hours.

NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center said the storm’s minimum pressure dropped to 928 millibars around 1 a.m. Eastern time, which likely places it in the top five strongest storms on record in this region.

[Washington, D.C., eclipses warmest December on record by an enormous margin]

“According to the center’s records, the all-time strongest storm in this area occurred on Dec. 15, 1986, and that had a minimum central pressure of 900 millibars,” Mashable’s Andrew Freedman reported on Tuesday. “The second-strongest storm occurred in January 1993, with a pressure of 916 millibars.”

Temperatures in the Arctic Circle were hovering around 32 degrees on Wednesday morning, using data from the GFS model. (weatherbell.com)

As this storm churns north, it’s forcing warm air into the Arctic Circle. Over the North Sea, sustained winds from the south are blasting at 70 mph, and gusting to well above 100 mph, drawing heat from south to north.

[The best — worst? — TV weather bloopers of 2015]

Although there are no permanent weather stations at the North Pole (or really anywhere in the Arctic Ocean), we can use weather forecast models, which ingest data from satellites and surrounding surface observations, to estimate conditions at Earth’s most northern location.

On Wednesday morning, temperatures over a vast area around North Pole were somewhere between 30 and 35 degrees Fahrenheit, and for at least a brief moment, surpassed the 32-degree threshold at exactly 90 degrees North, according to data from the GFS forecast model.

Data from the International Arctic Buoy Programme confirms that temperatures very close to the North Pole surpassed the melting point on Wednesday. A buoy (WMO ID Buoy 6400476) at a latitude of 87.45 degrees North hit a high temperature of 0.7 degrees Celsius — or 33 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Consider the average winter temperature there is around 20 degrees below zero,” wrote the Capital Weather Gang’s Jason Samenow on Monday. A temperature around the freezing mark signifies a departure from normal of over 50 degrees, and close to typical mid-summer temperatures in this region.

In other words, the area around the North Pole was about as warm as Chicago on Wednesday, and quite a few degrees warmer than much of the Midwest.
How El Niño will affect weather conditions this year
Play Video3:06
According to the World Meteorological Organization, the El Niño of 2015-2016 is shaping up to be one of the strongest in this past century. Here are the types of weather we can expect around the world due to this year's El Niño. (World Meteorological Organization/ YouTube)

Meanwhile in habitable areas around the North Atlantic, winds are howling and waves are rocking the coastline. In Britain, a week of excessive rainfall has pushed rivers and streams well beyond their banks, stranding vehicles and buckling bridges.

[Rivers are rising to record levels in the Midwest, flooding is ‘major to historic’]

In a blog post on Monday, the U.K. Met office said that December has been a record-breaking month for rainfall in parts of the United Kingdom. A Christmas weekend storm brought up to 8 inches of addition rainfall on saturated soil. The Met Office listed just a small portion of the December records that were set this weekend, in some cases blowing away the previous December records by 10 inches.
Capital Weather Gang
Freak storm pushes North Pole 50 degrees above normal to melting point
Resize Text
Print Article
Comments 1591
By Angela Fritz December 30, 2015

This storm in the far North Atlantic is the same storm that caused two tornado outbreaks and widespread flooding in the United States. Now, it’s pushing temperatures at the North Pole well above average. (earth.nullschool.net)

This story has been updated to include buoy measurements that confirm the North Pole temperature climbed above 32 degrees on Wednesday.

A powerful winter cyclone — the same storm that led to two tornado outbreaks in the United States and disastrous river flooding — has driven the North Pole to the freezing point this week, 50 degrees above average for this time of year.

From Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, a mind-boggling pressure drop was recorded in Iceland: 54 millibars in just 18 hours. This triples the criteria for “bomb” cyclogenesis, which meteorologists use to describe a rapidly intensifying mid-latitude storm. A “bomb” cyclone is defined as dropping one millibar per hour for 24 hours.

NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center said the storm’s minimum pressure dropped to 928 millibars around 1 a.m. Eastern time, which likely places it in the top five strongest storms on record in this region.

[Washington, D.C., eclipses warmest December on record by an enormous margin]

“According to the center’s records, the all-time strongest storm in this area occurred on Dec. 15, 1986, and that had a minimum central pressure of 900 millibars,” Mashable’s Andrew Freedman reported on Tuesday. “The second-strongest storm occurred in January 1993, with a pressure of 916 millibars.”

Temperatures in the Arctic Circle were hovering around 32 degrees on Wednesday morning, using data from the GFS model. (weatherbell.com)

As this storm churns north, it’s forcing warm air into the Arctic Circle. Over the North Sea, sustained winds from the south are blasting at 70 mph, and gusting to well above 100 mph, drawing heat from south to north.

[The best — worst? — TV weather bloopers of 2015]

Although there are no permanent weather stations at the North Pole (or really anywhere in the Arctic Ocean), we can use weather forecast models, which ingest data from satellites and surrounding surface observations, to estimate conditions at Earth’s most northern location.

On Wednesday morning, temperatures over a vast area around North Pole were somewhere between 30 and 35 degrees Fahrenheit, and for at least a brief moment, surpassed the 32-degree threshold at exactly 90 degrees North, according to data from the GFS forecast model.

Data from the International Arctic Buoy Programme confirms that temperatures very close to the North Pole surpassed the melting point on Wednesday. A buoy (WMO ID Buoy 6400476) at a latitude of 87.45 degrees North hit a high temperature of 0.7 degrees Celsius — or 33 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Consider the average winter temperature there is around 20 degrees below zero,” wrote the Capital Weather Gang’s Jason Samenow on Monday. A temperature around the freezing mark signifies a departure from normal of over 50 degrees, and close to typical mid-summer temperatures in this region.

In other words, the area around the North Pole was about as warm as Chicago on Wednesday, and quite a few degrees warmer than much of the Midwest.
How El Niño will affect weather conditions this year
Play Video3:06
According to the World Meteorological Organization, the El Niño of 2015-2016 is shaping up to be one of the strongest in this past century. Here are the types of weather we can expect around the world due to this year's El Niño. (World Meteorological Organization/ YouTube)

Meanwhile in habitable areas around the North Atlantic, winds are howling and waves are rocking the coastline. In Britain, a week of excessive rainfall has pushed rivers and streams well beyond their banks, stranding vehicles and buckling bridges.

[Rivers are rising to record levels in the Midwest, flooding is ‘major to historic’]

In a blog post on Monday, the U.K. Met office said that December has been a record-breaking month for rainfall in parts of the United Kingdom. A Christmas weekend storm brought up to 8 inches of addition rainfall on saturated soil. The Met Office listed just a small portion of the December records that were set this weekend, in some cases blowing away the previous December records by 10 inches.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/12/30/freak-storm-has-pushed-north-pole-to-freezing-point-50-degrees-above-normal/

Yowbarb

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Re: EXTREMES of HEAT and COLD in the US
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2016, 09:58:14 PM »
Enlightenme, thanks for posting this.
Yes, there really has been some bizarre weather events in the world in the past several months.
On The Weather Channel I saw an article - video about bizarre weather; will try to find it.
We do know that some weather records were broken recently.

 

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