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Author Topic: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him  (Read 9059 times)

Yowbarb

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Also posted in Notice To Members

Hi All: Marshall has been inundated with photos of varying types.
He asked me to relay this info to the Members on the Town Hall.
Any questions I will try to help, send  me a msg.
Barb Townsend



Thank you for submitting your image. Because we are a volunteer contributor site, we have limited time to review submitted images. In order to maximize our efforts, we require the following:
•   Original File Source: No thumbnails please. We need a copy of the actual original RAW file from the camera itself so that we can inspect the image metadata.
•   High Resolution: Cell phone cameras are of such poor quality that we cannot get good results from them. HD Smartphones are better, but we prefer images taken with a good prosumer or professional grade digital camera.
•   Observation Data: Without knowing the exact location the image was taken from to include date, time and direction a useful analysis is impossible.
•   Observer Personal Data: We need to know who took the image, if he or she personally witnessed the objects and if so what. Images from anonymous or reclusive sources are ignored.
•   Unobstructed view. No images shot through a car or home window. We only make exceptions for airline passengers shooting images at altitude.
If your submission fails any one of these five criteria, we will not open a file on it. However, we do encourage you to pursue your own analysis. Here are three things you can do to get started today at no cost to you:
Learn the CSI method: In our video, Planet X System Observations and Orbital Analysis, we explain the Camera Sensor Illumination (CS1) method. You can view it at: http://twosunsinthesky.com
Next, you need to obtain freely available software for your analysis. Marshall's preferred analysis tool is Snagit. A screen capture program with an advanced image editor he uses for over 90% of his work. You can download a free copy of the program to analyse your images at: http://www.techsmith.com/snagit.html
1.   Once you install the program, here are the direct steps to analyse your images:
2.   Save your images to your computer desktop.
3.   Open the Snagit editor.
4.   Open your image file in the editor.
5.   Once the image file is displayed, select the Image tab.
6.   From the image tab, you will see the Color Effects option.
7.   Select the Color Correction drop down menu option. This will display a pop up menu.
8.   Begin your analysis by reducing the Gamma setting.
For more advanced analysis, you can use a paint program such as Corel Paint, Adobe Photoshop or the freely available Gimp editor which is available for Windows at http://www.gimp.org
Again, we thank you for your submission and wish you the best of luck with your observation efforts.

CYB, Marshall 


..................

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2013, 09:50:04 PM »
I need advise to produce  high quality photos and i don't spoil this golden opportunity i have in my hands. Let me explain,  I may soon have the opportunity to gain access to a high level user of a major telescope observatory in the south of USA. Due to close personal relationships he has clearance to search the skies as he wish and my idea is to grab this opportunity to ask him to search for nibiru, ison, or whatever else we find necessary to advance the knowledge base of the civil sector on this important subject. 

I need help of professional astronomers or aficionados in this forum to teach me how to approach this opportunity with effectiveness and intelligently. I need to provide him with some clues at to where to point the telescope, over what specific region of the skies he should scan around, at what times, etc.. I have little technical training in astronomy and need to learn the jargon to talk to this guy properly. to be effective, I need to basically educate him about the nature of this project to motivate him to go for it. 

Also, I need advice about how to ask for photos of what we see, should bringing a pen drive with me would allow me to copy the telescope images (this is a huge institutional telescope) into it ? 

Any volunteers ?

Thank you.

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2013, 11:11:10 PM »
I need advise to produce  high quality photos and i don't spoil this golden opportunity i have in my hands. Let me explain,  I may soon have the opportunity to gain access to a high level user of a major telescope observatory in the south of USA. Due to close personal relationships he has clearance to search the skies as he wish and my idea is to grab this opportunity to ask him to search for nibiru, ison, or whatever else we find necessary to advance the knowledge base of the civil sector on this important subject.

I need help of professional astronomers or aficionados in this forum to teach me how to approach this opportunity with effectiveness and intelligently. I need to provide him with some clues at to where to point the telescope, over what specific region of the skies he should scan around, at what times, etc.. I have little technical training in astronomy and need to learn the jargon to talk to this guy properly. to be effective, I need to basically educate him about the nature of this project to motivate him to go for it.

Also, I need advice about how to ask for photos of what we see, should bringing a pen drive with me would allow me to copy the telescope images (this is a huge institutional telescope) into it ?

Any volunteers ?

Thank you.

Neurotek, welcome to the Town Hall.  :)
I just received this suggestion from our Researcher today. This is a start. See below in blue lettering.
Also, I forwarded your post to him so maybe he will post here.
Or, he might relay a communication to you.
Keep Looking Up,
Barb Townsend    scroll down:
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
from Researcher:
Maybe someone will locate an east facing CAM 10 – 20 degrees north.

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2013, 09:47:32 AM »
I need advise to produce  high quality photos and i don't spoil this golden opportunity i have in my hands. Let me explain,  I may soon have the opportunity to gain access to a high level user of a major telescope observatory in the south of USA. Due to close personal relationships he has clearance to search the skies as he wish and my idea is to grab this opportunity to ask him to search for nibiru, ison, or whatever else we find necessary to advance the knowledge base of the civil sector on this important subject.

I need help of professional astronomers or aficionados in this forum to teach me how to approach this opportunity with effectiveness and intelligently. I need to provide him with some clues at to where to point the telescope, over what specific region of the skies he should scan around, at what times, etc.. I have little technical training in astronomy and need to learn the jargon to talk to this guy properly. to be effective, I need to basically educate him about the nature of this project to motivate him to go for it.

Also, I need advice about how to ask for photos of what we see, should bringing a pen drive with me would allow me to copy the telescope images (this is a huge institutional telescope) into it ?

Any volunteers ?

Thank you.
Neurotek, just so you'll know I forwarded your post to the Researcher and Marshall.
we will see.
You can send me a Town Hall message me any time and I will give you my email too.
We do need some top notch images ...
How far south is the observatory?
Sincerely,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2013, 09:51:40 AM »
Neurotek,
PS Is this  observatory located in Atlanta, GA?
- Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2013, 01:07:17 PM »
Neurotek,

Tell the observatory you want to observe Comet ISON.  If you tell them you want to observe PX, you will not get far.

Marshall

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2013, 02:30:28 PM »
Neurotek,

Tell the observatory you want to observe Comet ISON.  If you tell them you want to observe PX, you will not get far.

Marshall

Noted. Thank you, yes, I will do that and then introduce the PX topic when we are there personally. But I need some technical advise at hand about how to locate PX to show him once I am there, otherwise I won't get far either. Help !

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2013, 02:33:15 PM »
Neurotek,
PS Is this  observatory located in Atlanta, GA?
- Yowbarb


Sorry, I won't offer any clues that would help identify my source. I will do that after my visit, not before.

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2013, 02:43:52 PM »

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
from Researcher:
Maybe someone will locate an east facing CAM 10 – 20 degrees north.

This seems to me a very general lead, can you get a bit more specific ? Does this mean to point at the east direction ? Then 10-20 degrees north ? I guess this is a huge territory to explore. I need directions for Ison, as I will start with my Ison request, before I make my move to ask for the PX hunting. Do we have idea of constellations to look for ? Is the time of the day important ? Near the sun I guess ?  I need more details please.

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2013, 11:39:12 PM »

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
from Researcher:
Maybe someone will locate an east facing CAM 10 – 20 degrees north.

This seems to me a very general lead, can you get a bit more specific ? Does this mean to point at the east direction ? Then 10-20 degrees north ? I guess this is a huge territory to explore. I need directions for Ison, as I will start with my Ison request, before I make my move to ask for the PX hunting. Do we have idea of constellations to look for ? Is the time of the day important ? Near the sun I guess ?  I need more details please.


Hello Neurotek,
•   That Latitude 10 - 20 degrees north is a general suggestion from our Researcher.
•   You are probably located farther north than that, just put latitude/longitude in notes.
•   West (sunset) East sunrise. You can observe in any direction, of course.
•   Date time stamp important. Notes on direction, location, scope, cam or camera used.
•   Sunset seems the optimal time and I would try sunrise too if that is possible.
•   Looking for a good capture of an object near the sun.
•   Also: Marshall is interested in you looking up coordinates of ISON on NASA and observing at that observatory.
•   You mentioned taking photos...is that doable?
•   You don't really need to tell the observatory staffmember you are hunting for Planet X, do you?
•   Marshall posted to you - probably best to not say that.
•   I wouldn't worry about constellations at this point.
•   To reiterate: Looking for a good capture of an object near the sun.

Well, I hope this helps. Please send me a private message about any more questions,
Sincerely,
Barb Townsend

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2013, 05:41:50 AM »
Thank you, I will start approaching my contact for an appointment at the observatory. Will keep you posted via PM. Blessings to all.

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2013, 06:16:24 AM »
..... But now I have a question, I am trying the understand the dynamics of moving celestial bodies with my limited astronomy expertise.

The question is this: if the object of interest is located near the Sun while observing, and the object is currently coming from outside the Earth orbit, let's say from the neighborhood of Saturn/Jupiter, then as the earth moves away from such line of vision with the passing weeks or months, should we expect to see the object increasingly farther from the Sun ? It should start moving away from the Sun until exactly six months later we have the object in the opposite side of the sun, I mean if I face the sun during sunset, it should be near the horizon 180 degrees in my back, right ?

So if the images captured by the Canadian businessman with his Nikon camera are showing PX near the sun in May 2013, my common sense tells me that 4 months later I should expect to see the body NOT that close to the sun anymore, right ? In theory, the only way I would continue to see the object near the sun is that the object is actually near the sun within the earth's orbit. 

Do you understand my concern ? I can draw a sketch to clarify my question graphically if needed. 

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2013, 06:53:55 AM »
..... But now I have a question, I am trying the understand the dynamics of moving celestial bodies with my limited astronomy expertise.

The question is this: if the object of interest is located near the Sun while observing, and the object is currently coming from outside the Earth orbit, let's say from the neighborhood of Saturn/Jupiter, then as the earth moves away from such line of vision with the passing weeks or months, should we expect to see the object increasingly farther from the Sun ? It should start moving away from the Sun until exactly six months later we have the object in the opposite side of the sun, I mean if I face the sun during sunset, it should be near the horizon 180 degrees in my back, right ?

So if the images captured by the Canadian businessman with his Nikon camera are showing PX near the sun in May 2013, my common sense tells me that 4 months later I should expect to see the body NOT that close to the sun anymore, right ? In theory, the only way I would continue to see the object near the sun is that the object is actually near the sun within the earth's orbit.

Do you understand my concern ? I can draw a sketch to clarify my question graphically if needed.

Neurotek,

•   Sorry I really can't answer your astronomical questions.
•   I'm not sure if Marshall will post here about it, he might.
•   I made you part of the Stringers Group.
•   It certainly is not mandatory that you help, but if your goal is to help:
•   Take some photos through the telescope, capturing an object near the sun.
•   Since you have to set up an appointment time try for the sunset time slot.

Sorry not a lot of time to discuss the theory we mainly want to get some decent images...
The idea is to make it more real so people have more certainty, so people prepare better and so on...

- Barb Townsend

Neurotek

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2013, 09:10:49 PM »
Neurotek,

•   Sorry I really can't answer your astronomical questions.
•   I'm not sure if Marshall will post here about it, he might.
•   I made you part of the Stringers Group.
•   It certainly is not mandatory that you help, but if your goal is to help:
•   Take some photos through the telescope, capturing an object near the sun.
•   Since you have to set up an appointment time try for the sunset time slot.

Sorry not a lot of time to discuss the theory we mainly want to get some decent images...
The idea is to make it more real so people have more certainty, so people prepare better and so on...

- Barb Townsend
[/quote]

Thank you Barb. My  intention in asking for advise in this forum is precisely to help the advancement of civilian knowledge about PX, as I see Marshall's work and it motivates me to contribute. I want to capture the best photos ever, to share them with the world. I want to grab this opportunity of having an institutional telescope at my disposal, I am sure such equipment has the standard capability of capturing hi-res digital images of whatever we are observing optically. I can come out of the session with a pen drive full of quality images to share with the world. I feel this is the most relevant forum to ask for such advise and here i am, asking for a simple astronomy question that I must have an answer prior to facing an astronomer with my proposal to seek and observe PX. He will probably have the same question I am asking here and he most likely dismiss my project shortly thereafter if I don't have a reasonable notion of why we have to look near the sun, no matter the time of the year. I would like to think that some member of this forum has the knowledge for answering such basic question. If I don't find it here, where do I go ? If am not able to enroll the astronomer into hunting for PX, then how can I bring such decent images that we all want ?

Yowbarb

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Re: Here is what Marshall needs - the standard for photos you send him
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2013, 05:53:21 AM »
Neurotek,

•   Sorry I really can't answer your astronomical questions.
•   I'm not sure if Marshall will post here about it, he might.
•   I made you part of the Stringers Group.
•   It certainly is not mandatory that you help, but if your goal is to help:
•   Take some photos through the telescope, capturing an object near the sun.
•   Since you have to set up an appointment time try for the sunset time slot.

Sorry not a lot of time to discuss the theory we mainly want to get some decent images...
The idea is to make it more real so people have more certainty, so people prepare better and so on...

- Barb Townsend

Thank you Barb. My  intention in asking for advise in this forum is precisely to help the advancement of civilian knowledge about PX, as I see Marshall's work and it motivates me to contribute. I want to capture the best photos ever, to share them with the world. I want to grab this opportunity of having an institutional telescope at my disposal, I am sure such equipment has the standard capability of capturing hi-res digital images of whatever we are observing optically. I can come out of the session with a pen drive full of quality images to share with the world. I feel this is the most relevant forum to ask for such advise and here i am, asking for a simple astronomy question that I must have an answer prior to facing an astronomer with my proposal to seek and observe PX. He will probably have the same question I am asking here and he most likely dismiss my project shortly thereafter if I don't have a reasonable notion of why we have to look near the sun, no matter the time of the year. I would like to think that some member of this forum has the knowledge for answering such basic question. If I don't find it here, where do I go ? If am not able to enroll the astronomer into hunting for PX, then how can I bring such decent images that we all want ?
[/quote]

Neurotek - I'm really sorry...

•   I was not able to answer those questions at the moment...
•   It is probably possible to get you some answers, but my main focus is keep it running here and also receive images from the Stringers. 
•   I am sending you a private message with my email.
•   I appreciate the fact you are apparently trying to do something ground-breaking.
•   You originally asked for advice on photography...now it seems to be clarifying Marshall’s theory on PX and accompanying objects.
•   I feel your answers are to be found in Marshall’s films, etc.
•   We do have other Topics where Members discuss more on theories of PX etc.
•   This particular Topic is mainly to let Guests, Members/Stringers know Marshall’s standards for photography.
•   I have done the best I can to simply post up what Marshall is requesting.
•   Yes let's discuss it off this Topic, what I mean is, this situation with the astronomer...and your astronomical questions.
•   Let’s email a couple times. We will start there...
•   You can send me specifics on your observatory appt., when, where etc.

- Barb Townsend


 

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