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Author Topic: Stonehenge  (Read 10019 times)

Yowbarb

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Stonehenge
« on: July 28, 2010, 10:04:40 AM »
Joe Montanna, I thought you might find Stonehenge to be an interesting Topic.
I just noticed this story on CNN.
All The Best,
Yowbarb

...
http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/europe/07/22/britain.stonehenge.discovery/index.html?iref=obnetwork
Stonehenge archaeologists discover 'wooden henge'
By Paul Armstrong, CNN
July 22, 2010 2:18 p.m. EDT

London, England (CNN) -- Archaeologists studying the iconic Stonehenge monument in southern England have uncovered a second prehistoric henge-like circle only 900 meters away, which they hope will shed more light on the mysterious stone landmark.

The remains, comprising a circular ditch surrounding a ring of 24 internal pits up to one meter in diameter and designed to allow posts to support a free-standing, timber structure up to three meters high -- are thought to date from the late Neolithic period, some 4,500 years ago.

"Although it would have been made out of timber rather than stone, it's comparable in scale to the existing Stonehenge monument," said Henry Chapman of the University of Birmingham in central England.

Chapman was one of the British-led team involved in a multi-million dollar project to "map" the World Heritage site, using state-of-the-art imaging technology to recreate "virtually" the iconic monument and its surroundings.

The images, which resemble a lunar landscape, provide an outline of the circle buried under the surface with its opposing north-east and south-west entrances, together with what archaeologists believe to be a burial mound in the center.

This discovery is completely new and extremely important in how we understand Stonehenge and its landscape.

--Professor Vince Gaffney
 
"Rather than giving us a map or plan of what is buried, this technology allows us to see it in three dimensions," Chapman told CNN. "We can almost excavate the site virtually by peeling off five centimeters at a time to see what is there."

Project leader, Professor Vince Gaffney of the University of Birmingham, hailed the find as one of the most significant yet for those researching Britain's most important prehistoric structure.

"This finding is remarkable," he said in a statement on the university's website. "It will completely change the way we think about the landscape around Stonehenge.

"People have tended to think that as Stonehenge reached its peak it was the paramount monument, existing in splendid isolation. This discovery is completely new and extremely important in how we understand Stonehenge and its landscape."

Chapman added that the find may be the start of an exciting new chapter at Stonehenge. "We're just in the first year of a four-year project, so we'd expect to find lots more between the known monuments we see at present and hopefully fill the gaps in our knowledge," he said.

Debate has raged about the origins and purpose of Stonehenge, located on Salisbury Plain approximately 90 miles west of London.

Known for its orientation in relation to the rising and setting sun, the circle of stones represented a prehistoric temple to some. Others argued it was an astronomical observatory. Or that it was a marker of time.

But last year, archaeologists unearthed a new stone circle a mile from Stonehenge that they said lent credence to the theory that the famous monument was part of a funeral complex.

Dubbed "Bluestonehenge" after the color of the 25 Welsh stones of which it was once composed, the new find sat along the banks of the nearby River Avon.

University of Bristol archaeologist Joshua Pollard suggested Neolithic peoples would have come down river by boat and literally stepped off into Bluestonehenge. They may have congregated at certain times of the year, including the winter solstice, and carried remains of the dead from Bluestonehenge down an almost two-mile funeral processional route to a cemetery at Stonehenge to bury them.

The latest project, which is supported by the site's landowner, the National Trust, and facilitated by English Heritage, brought together the most sophisticated geophysics team ever to be engaged in a single archaeological project in Britain, involving archaeologists and other specialists from the UK, Austria, Germany, Norway and Sweden.

...

augonit

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2011, 06:58:40 PM »
One morning about 12 years ago, I woke up early with the thought that Stonehenge was just a burial site.  Since I hadn't been thinking of Stonehenge for a very long time prior to that, I always thought that had to be one of those moments of truth that happen rarely.  No matter what kind of crap people believe about it, or what the latest popular theory for the day is, I'll always believe Stonehenge was a burial site, even if it served as another thing too.

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2011, 06:38:18 AM »
One morning about 12 years ago, I woke up early with the thought that Stonehenge was just a burial site.  Since I hadn't been thinking of Stonehenge for a very long time prior to that, I always thought that had to be one of those moments of truth that happen rarely.  No matter what kind of crap people believe about it, or what the latest popular theory for the day is, I'll always believe Stonehenge was a burial site, even if it served as another thing too.

Well here is one link... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge
we can all research this more...

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2011, 06:49:00 AM »
Stonehenge
Excerpts from Wikipedia article:
  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

Function and construction
Main article: Theories about Stonehenge
Theories about Stonehenge

In the Mesolithic period, two large wooden posts were erected at the site. Today, they are marked by circular white marks in the middle of the car park.

Stonehenge was produced by a culture that left no written records. Many aspects of Stonehenge remain subject to debate. This multiplicity of theories, some of them very colourful, are often called the "mystery of Stonehenge".

There is little or no direct evidence for the construction techniques used by the Stonehenge builders. Over the years, various authors have suggested that supernatural or anachronistic methods were used, usually asserting that the stones were impossible to move otherwise. However, conventional techniques using Neolithic technology have been demonstrably effective at moving and placing stones of a similar size.[16] Proposed functions for the site include usage as an astronomical observatory, or as a religious site.

More recently two major new theories have been proposed. Professor Mike Parker Pearson, head of the Stonehenge Riverside Project, has suggested that Stonehenge was part of a ritual landscape and was joined to Durrington Walls by their corresponding avenues and the River Avon. He suggests that the area around Durrington Walls Henge was a place of the living, whilst Stonehenge was a domain of the dead. A journey along the Avon to reach Stonehenge was part of a ritual passage from life to death, to celebrate past ancestors and the recently deceased.[14] On the other hand, Geoffery Wainwright, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Timothy Darvill of Bournemouth University have suggested that Stonehenge was a place of healing – the primeval equivalent of Lourdes.[17] They argue that this accounts for the high number of burials in the area and for the evidence of trauma deformity in some of the graves. However they do concede that the site was probably multifunctional and used for ancestor worship as well.[18] Isotope analysis indicates that some of the buried individuals were from other regions. A teenage boy buried approximately 1550 BC was raised near the Mediterranean Sea; a metal worker from 2300 BC dubbed the "Amesbury Archer" grew up near the alpine foothills of Germany; and the "Boscombe Bowmen" likely arrived from Wales or Brittany, France.[19]

Whatever religious, mystical or spiritual elements were central to Stonehenge, its design includes a celestial observatory function, which might have allowed prediction of eclipse, solstice, equinox and other celestial events important to a contemporary religion...

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2011, 06:58:27 AM »
One morning about 12 years ago, I woke up early with the thought that Stonehenge was just a burial site.  Since I hadn't been thinking of Stonehenge for a very long time prior to that, I always thought that had to be one of those moments of truth that happen rarely.  No matter what kind of crap people believe about it, or what the latest popular theory for the day is, I'll always believe Stonehenge was a burial site, even if it served as another thing too.


Lots of evidence that is was used as a funerary site. My opinion is it is more...
Just a part of the article below,
Yowbarb


Stonehenge as part of a ritual landscape
Sunset at Stonehenge

Many archaeologists believe Stonehenge was an attempt to render in permanent stone the more common timber structures that dotted Salisbury Plain at the time, such as those that stood at Durrington Walls. Modern anthropological evidence has been used by Mike Parker Pearson and the Malagasy archaeologist Ramilisonina to suggest that timber was associated with the living and stone with the ancestral dead amongst prehistoric peoples. They have argued that Stonehenge was the terminus of a long, ritualised funerary procession for treating the dead, which began in the east, during sunrise at Woodhenge and Durrington Walls, moved down the Avon and then along the Avenue reaching Stonehenge in the west at sunset. The journey from wood to stone via water was, they consider, a symbolic journey from life to death. There is no satisfactory evidence to suggest that Stonehenge's astronomical alignments were anything more than symbolic and current interpretations favour a ritual role for the monument that takes into account its numerous burials and its presence within a wider landscape of sacred sites. Many also believe that the site may have had astrological/spiritual significance attached to it.

Support for this view also comes from the historian of religions, Mircea Eliade, who compares the site to other megalithic constructions around the world devoted to the cult of the dead (ancestors).

    "Like other similar English monuments [For example, Eliade identifies, Woodhenge, Avebury, Arminghall, and Arbor Low] the Stonehenge cromlech was situated in the middle of a field of funeral barrows. This famous ceremonial centre constituted, at least in its primitive form, a sanctuary built to insure relations with the ancestors. In terms of structure, Stonehenge can be compared with certain megalithic complexes developed, in other cultures, from a sacred area: temples or cities. We have the same valourisation of the sacred space as "centre of the world," the privileged place that affords communication with heaven and the underworld, that is, with the gods, the chtonian goddesses, and the spirits of the dead."[17]

In addition to the English sites, Eliade identifies, among others, the megalithic architecture of Malta, which represents a "spectacular expression" of the cult of the dead and worship of a Great Goddess....

[continues]  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theories_about_Stonehenge 
Theories about Stonehenge.

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2011, 07:03:57 AM »
Ley lines

British author John Michell wrote that Alfred Watkins' ley lines appeared to be in alignment with various traditional sacred sites around the country. Michell wrote that "There is a curious symmetry about the positioning of the three Perpetual Choirs in Britain. Stonehenge and Llantwit Major are equidistant from Glastonbury, some 38.9 miles away, and two straight lines drawn on the map from Glastonbury to the other two choirs form an angle of 144 degrees...The axis of Glastonbury Abbey points toward Stonehenge, and there is some evidence that it was built on a stretch on ancient trackway which once ran between the two Choirs". Michell created diagrams that illustrated correlations between the design of Stonehenge and astronomical proportions and relationships. However, the Welsh Triads refer not to Stonehenge but to the village of Amesbury which is two miles from Stonehenge.

 [ More discussion on this, later, YB ]

...............................
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 07:09:03 AM by Yowbarb »

_cj_

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2011, 11:14:07 AM »
i live on the ridgeway which follows the michael and mary ley lines  ;D

Regards,

alex

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2011, 12:31:38 AM »
i live on the ridgeway which follows the michael and mary ley lines  ;D

Regards,

alex

That's interesting...
when I visited family in England I was told about special lines and one place we went in Alderly Edge, I could sort of feel them..
Did you sense anything unusual?
Yowbarb

_cj_

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2011, 01:07:05 AM »
hi barb, i dont know really - the ridgeway does feel different, i suppose the best way i could describe it that it feels old.  Maybe thats because i know it is old though.  From our front door you can see Cymbeline's mount which is a site of an iron age fort and you know the same paths have been used for 5,000 years.

i dont know if there are any acurate maps of the M&M ley lines - if there were it might be intetresting to walk accross them - being an intertwined pair of one male and one female, i wonder if they feel different.

this is where i live http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellesborough ans st peter and st paul  is the church where i got married  ;D

Regards,

alex

_cj_

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2011, 01:10:13 AM »

augonit

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2011, 07:02:25 AM »
Are there any ley lines in America?  And if so, where are they.  I only hear about them in regards to England.

Jimfarmer

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2011, 08:07:41 AM »
"Are there any ley lines in America?"

They are everywhere.

From http://liminalthresholds.blogspot.com/2008/04/ley-line-maps.html :

_cj_

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2011, 08:35:58 AM »
Are there any ley lines in America?  And if so, where are they.  I only hear about them in regards to England.

if not telluric currents they are linked to them therefore they have to be throughout the world.  Ley line might just be a british term, the indians called them spirit lines, the aboriginals called them dream lines

regards,

alex

augonit

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2011, 08:23:07 PM »
I'll have to look up spirit lines.  According to the map provided by Jim, I'm in the circled area of a starbiome.  I don't know what that means.  I don't know if that's really good, or really bad.  I did some research earlier today, but got nowhere.

Yowbarb

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Re: Stonehenge
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2011, 07:30:23 AM »
hi barb, i dont know really - the ridgeway does feel different, i suppose the best way i could describe it that it feels old.  Maybe thats because i know it is old though.  From our front door you can see Cymbeline's mount which is a site of an iron age fort and you know the same paths have been used for 5,000 years.

i dont know if there are any acurate maps of the M&M ley lines - if there were it might be intetresting to walk accross them - being an intertwined pair of one male and one female, i wonder if they feel different.

this is where i live http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellesborough and st peter and st paul  is the church where i got married  ;D

Regards,

alex

Alex thanks for sharing that...
What I felt was a slightly heightened energy, cool peaceful and good  that was in Alderly Edge in one line my daughter pointed out to me. I can't verify just now it was in a ley line but I think so. Will be back on that.
Thanks for sharing the photo!
 ;D
- Yowbarb

 

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