Author Topic: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for  (Read 3736 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2016, 06:42:34 PM »
Yowbarb Note -  see more images in article. Pic: Only a small amount of damage from Texas wildfire, dome has since been sealed to afford better protection from fire.
...

http://www.monolithic.org/benefits/benefits-survivability

http://www.monolithic.org/benefits/benefits-survivability/monolithic-dome-survives-texas-wildfire

Monolithic Dome Survives Texas Wildfire

Mike South • Published on Oct 27, 2011

Fathers Day, 2011: On that day the Antelope Springs Ranch in Blackwell, Texas fell victim to a wildfire that blazed across the Lone Star State. This fire destroyed 100,000 acres before it was stopped.

With limited resources to fight such a big fire, Antelope Springs Ranch was hit full force. Damage to the surrounding buildings was catastrophic, but the Monolithic Dome survived with just a scar.

Bill McLeod, owner of the Antelope Springs Ranch, called me and asked me to come and visit his site. The dome at Antelope Ranch, built by Monolithic about 11 years ago, is a beautiful hunters’ lodge.

The Damage
When I arrived, I immediately saw that the landscaping was completely burned. Driving to the dome, I could see that the attached garage had burned to the ground, but the dome had survived quite well.

Mr. McLeod described the fire: It started at the garage and worked its way to the dome. Pushed by 30 and 40 mile-an-hour winds, the fire blazed toward the dome whose other side was connected to a plastic greenhouse.

“It was the greenhouse fire that caused the most damage,” said Mr. McLeod. Indeed the greenhouse fueled a fire that blazed up the side of the dome, and before it was done it left a black scar across the dome’s top.

No other building would have survived such a fire — no way!

The Repair
Monolithic was called to repair the dome. We began by removing all the blackened portion of the foam. That foam had been under severe heat, but it had only burned through about a half-inch to one inch of the three inches of foam. Once the blackened foam was removed, we replaced it by spraying a new layer of Polyurethane Foam.

When the foam was completed, we coated it with an elastomeric coating to help keep it sealed. It’s difficult to keep the foam smooth while spraying it on the outside of a structure. Next we sprayed a layer of our light composite Monolithic Stucco, topped with a coat of Poly-Sil 2200, over the foam.

Now that the dome has a concrete coating on its outside, fire will be even less of a problem. We expect this Monolithic Dome, like its brothers and sisters, to last a few centuries.

Socrates

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Straw bale dome vs fire
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2016, 10:40:49 PM »
Strawbale and dome buildings are also safe from FIRE. When a fire once ravaged an area, nothing was left standing except for a strawbale wall. Once covered in a layer of lime or cob, heat only chars a few centimeter of the hay, the outer layer, but after the oxygen is gone within the strawbale wall, the rest of the hay remains untouched and insulates while remaining as support, i.e. you're strawbale wall just becomes a few percent thinner, that's all. A test with a 1000 degree fire on one side of a strawbale wall, had the temperature on the other side go up by a mere 6 degrees.
The dome structure, too, is amazing. A fire that passed over a dome house, left it almost completely untouched, as the fire, like wind, can't get a good hold on the rounded form
The question of fire-resistance of straw bale building has, obviously, always been a big concern of a lot of people. Therefore, folks interested in straw bales as a construction material have had very detailed and professional research done into the matter and that research proves what i talked about.
One should realize that a properly cobbed straw bale wall will not only hold up well against fire but it will do so FAR BETTER than most walls. Say, you have a log cabin; say you have any wall made of timber or any such materials; such walls will be gone in MINUTES whereas the straw bale wall will not only keep standing, it will retain it's structural capacity and integrity.

can you post any data you may have on how to quickly cover the straw tops with something so it could resist fire.
My two main concerns are fire and also possibly not having the structure anchored enough, high wind etc.
When one builds with tightly packed and bundled dry organic matter (i.e. like straw bales), one usually immediately covers them with cob inside and out. Cob on the outside is necessary or your dry organic matter will soak up rain and non longer function as it should and cob inside will keep the place from smelling like straw or dead leaves or whatever you've bundled together.

Usually people gather their materials [bales, clay, dirt, water, whatever] and then start building. You ask how to "quickly" fire-proof the bales; well, that's a matter of mixing your cob ingredients and smacking that onto the bales. Now, if you don't care what the end result looks like, i imagine that's a few hours work at most [how big is the house? How many people involved?].
As to your straw bales being anchored properly, that question applies to any structure, though, to be fair, the question is LESS APPROPRIATE when talking about domes because their very shape makes it very difficult for wind to get a hold on it [which is why so many tents nowadays are dome-shaped].
When building with straw bales one ALWAYS stakes them together and into the ground properly. Having said that, an earthquake will throw whole buildings up into the air unless they are properly anchored, so, yeah, i would make sure it's done properly. Of course that's about buildings in general. It's not like straw bales don't weigh anything...

The Repair
Monolithic was called to repair the dome. We began by removing all the blackened portion of the foam. That foam had been under severe heat, but it had only burned through about a half-inch to one inch of the three inches of foam. Once the blackened foam was removed, we replaced it by spraying a new layer of Polyurethane Foam.
You don't necessarily need any high-tech modern foam to be fire-resistant. The cob is dirt and clay and won't burn. Hell, if the fire is hot enough, it'll just turn it into pottery of sorts... Anyway, it will keep oxygen away from the dry organic matter you have bundled together beneath it.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 10:56:38 PM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: Straw bale dome vs fire
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2016, 11:33:35 PM »
Strawbale and dome buildings are also safe from FIRE. When a fire once ravaged an area, nothing was left standing except for a strawbale wall. Once covered in a layer of lime or cob, heat only chars a few centimeter of the hay, the outer layer, but after the oxygen is gone within the strawbale wall, the rest of the hay remains untouched and insulates while remaining as support, i.e. you're strawbale wall just becomes a few percent thinner, that's all. A test with a 1000 degree fire on one side of a strawbale wall, had the temperature on the other side go up by a mere 6 degrees.
The dome structure, too, is amazing. A fire that passed over a dome house, left it almost completely untouched, as the fire, like wind, can't get a good hold on the rounded form.
The question of fire-resistance of straw bale building has, obviously, always been a big concern of a lot of people. Therefore, folks interested in straw bales as a construction material have had very detailed and professional research done into the matter and that research proves what i talked about.
One should realize that a properly cobbed straw bale wall will not only hold up well against fire but it will do so FAR BETTER than most walls. Say, you have a log cabin; say you have any wall made of timber or any such materials; such walls will be gone in MINUTES whereas the straw bale wall will not only keep standing, it will retain it's structural capacity and integrity.

When one builds with tightly packed and bundled dry organic matter (i.e. like straw bales), one usually immediately covers them with cob inside and out. Cob on the outside is necessary or your dry organic matter will soak up rain and non longer function as it should and cob inside will keep the place from smelling like straw or dead leaves or whatever you've bundled together.

Usually people gather their materials [bales, clay, dirt, water, whatever] and then start building. You ask how to "quickly" fire-proof the bales; well, that's a matter of mixing your cob ingredients and smacking that onto the bales. Now, if you don't care what the end result looks like, i imagine that's a few hours work at most [how big is the house? How many people involved?].
As to your straw bales being anchored properly, that question applies to any structure, though, to be fair, the question is LESS APPROPRIATE when talking about domes because their very shape makes it very difficult for wind to get a hold on it [which is why so many tents nowadays are dome-shaped].
When building with straw bales one ALWAYS stakes them together and into the ground properly. Having said that, an earthquake will throw whole buildings up into the air unless they are properly anchored, so, yeah, i would make sure it's done properly. Of course that's about buildings in general. It's not like straw bales don't weigh anything...

You don't necessarily need any high-tech modern foam to be fire-resistant. The cob is dirt and clay and won't burn. Hell, if the fire is hot enough, it'll just turn it into pottery of sorts... Anyway, it will keep oxygen away from the dry organic matter you have bundled together beneath it.

OK I really appreciate that... You have given a pretty good explanation of what can help fireproof a strawbale structure, strawbale dome, etc.
Maybe we can find some good videos of using cob or lime on the outside of the straw bale walls or roof and post them here.
I can look for them, too. Maybe that Fordhall website you had mentioned
Your knowledge and work here is much appreciated,
Yowbarb

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2016, 01:41:10 AM »
I posted a few instructional videos about strawbale, cob, new Topic, Survival Structures.

Link: http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=6356.new#new

Socrates

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Cobbing your dome...
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2016, 02:22:34 AM »
Check out this vid i ran into; it'll give you a good idea about cobbing your straw bale wall or dome.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Cobbing your dome...
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2016, 03:16:30 PM »
Check out this vid i ran into; it'll give you a good idea about cobbing your straw bale wall or dome.
Socrates, good stuff, please post it in this topic, instead:
new Topic, Survival Structures.

Link: http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=6356.new#new

Yowbarb

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2016, 10:29:35 PM »
Re Previously posted ideas on necessity for reinforcements of dome windows and doors:

Yowbarb

SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS and TORNADOES
« Reply #267 on: April 29, 2014, 08:51:05 AM »



Yowbarb Note: Any dome which you intend to build needs to have set in thick plastic windows and reinforcements on the inside to put over windows and the door. Otherwise the wind will blow the windows in and tear off that door. The dome structure is extremely strong. Don't forget to create ways to reinforce all openings to the dome shelter. This is just an example of a dome home. It needs extra reinforcements ...

My Note continued: In the news presentation of Channel 23 Heartland News - a Fox Affiliate for Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky the newscaster said some domes can withstand 350 mph. Interview with Professor Michael Cobb, Physics Professor of Southeast Missouri University
.............................................................................................
http://www.monolithic.org/stories/surviving-hurricanes-and-tornadoes

http://www.monolithic.org/stories/video-missouri-professor-touts-the-survivability-traits-of-the-monolithic-dome

Video: Missouri professor touts the survivability traits of the Monolithic Dome

Kelly Lewis  May 30, 2013, 2:35 PM
.................................................................

Yowbarb

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2016, 10:09:18 PM »
Yowbarb Note: In first video, obviously a door which only opens from the outside and locks outside would not work for a survival structure. This has some good ideas, could be modified. All structures I see would need modifications to secure windows and doors and make them less visible or able to be entered. Also more secure from high winds etc. This is a lovely little home, nice ideas. ...
Kristie Wolfe builds underground home & sets rural WA hamlet  25:36    1,875,074 views

https://youtu.be/Ix11VQ8f7uY 
...
Maharlika eco-dome home by legobrick systems and designs

https://youtu.be/TfQYb42yJOk

Published on Mar 16, 2013
green homes or eco-friendly homes by legobrick systems and designs email legobrick08@yahoo.com or text 09278587110
...
Our Brick Dome  5:24

https://youtu.be/pZ3ksh-gMVk
...

The Dome Home Timothy Oulton  3:14

https://youtu.be/UI05d1jHoXM

Ingenieurbüro Meyer-Olbersleben, Ihr Haus-Doktor
Published on Dec 27, 2015
The DOME HOME by the founder of HALO ASIA, Timothy Oulton, is a wooden house, shaped as a half ball. All material of that building are healthy and renewable. This building follow the idea of the building biology and passive house standard.
...

Yowbarb

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2016, 10:19:04 PM »
Stone House in Portugal...

This one sort of inspires me to figure out how to use natural structures...
...
VIDEO showing construction on this page:
http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/10/a-casa-do-penedo-back.jpg

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/real-life-flintstones-house-lures-tourists-in-portugal.html

"...Located in the Fafe mountains of northern Portugal, A Casa do Penedo, or "the House of Stone," was built between four large boulders found on the site. Although the house may seem rustic, it is not lacking in amenities, which include a fireplace and a swimming pool--carved out of one of the large rocks."  "For security, the house features bullet-proof windows and a steel door."

Socrates

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Re: stone house in Portugal
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2016, 11:11:29 PM »
LOL That's just funny, but it reminds me of this house-sized boulder i came across on La Gomera [second-smallest of the Canary Islands] 10 km inland...
So..."HTF did that boulder GET there in the first place?!", one might ask.

Megatsunamis... Portugal catches the brunt of Atlantic upheavals like few other European coasts. If one takes a look at bathymetric charts, it is clear that the entire coast of France is only 50m deep for hundreds of miles. Aside from that, much of north-western Europe is protected from megatsunami destruction by the presence of the UK islands. The coast of the Iberian peninsula, however, takes the brunt of Atlantic disruption head-on; it's no wonder such a large boulder can be found there.

Will even such a boulder be safe then? Well, whatever brought that boulder there might also take it away again, no....?
Yeah, it's heavy, but look at the destruction LAKES caused in North America; though the progenitor of this concept was ridiculed in this own lifetime, it is now commonly accepted that the Grand Canyon was created by great lakes of melting ice water making their way to the Mexican Gulf. When one considers the destructive potential of water in such light, moving around a boulder, even a house-sized one, is peanuts.

This picture should be a reminder of the forces we face, about how serious we need to be about our considerations and plans. Our feelings and imagination might fail us but logic can prevail and lead us to be serious about making sure our survival location is up to standing up to what will possibly (or likely) come to pass one day.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2016, 11:51:31 PM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: stone house in Portugal
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2016, 06:49:36 PM »
LOL That's just funny, but it reminds me of this house-sized boulder i came across on La Gomera [second-smallest of the Canary Islands] 10 km inland...
So..."HTF did that boulder GET there in the first place?!", one might ask.

Megatsunamis... Portugal catches the brunt of Atlantic upheavals like few other European coasts. If one takes a look at bathymetric charts, it is clear that the entire coast of France is only 50m deep for hundreds of miles. Aside from that, much of north-western Europe is protected from megatsunami destruction by the presence of the UK islands. The coast of the Iberian peninsula, however, takes the brunt of Atlantic disruption head-on; it's no wonder such a large boulder can be found there.

Will even such a boulder be safe then? Well, whatever brought that boulder there might also take it away again, no....?
Yeah, it's heavy, but look at the destruction LAKES caused in North America; though the progenitor of this concept was ridiculed in this own lifetime, it is now commonly accepted that the Grand Canyon was created by great lakes of melting ice water making their way to the Mexican Gulf. When one considers the destructive potential of water in such light, moving around a boulder, even a house-sized one, is peanuts.

This picture should be a reminder of the forces we face, about how serious we need to be about our considerations and plans. Our feelings and imagination might fail us but logic can prevail and lead us to be serious about making sure our survival location is up to standing up to what will possibly (or likely) come to pass one day.

Socrates, true, just because a house is on a hilltop and nestled or carved into boulders doesn't mean the location is safe. I agree.
Spain and Portugal never high on my list of places to go. Thanks for sharing that info about the megatsunami threat to the Iberian Peninsula...
Now, if I were in an area I consider pretty safe and it were possible to incorporate the local geographic features in my structure, I'd be willing to try that.

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2016, 07:10:30 PM »
I believe one should always keep bedrock in mind...
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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #27 on: January 12, 2017, 01:20:07 AM »
I believe one should always keep bedrock in mind...

A good idea...

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Re: DOMES, UNDERGROUND SHELTERS, etc. New Topic for
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2017, 01:18:41 PM »
Here is one other place to learn more about domes and purchase...
...
https://www.facebook.com/intershelterinc/