Author Topic: what is 'survival food' / what to think of  (Read 12074 times)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #120 on: August 27, 2017, 05:21:39 PM »
The Papa Chonca potato was discussed, IIRC, in the SEEDS subject, but since I've ordered and planted them, late BTW, and they are now thriving, it's time to show and tell.
The guy offering this variety said it's the closest thing to a perennial potato, so I felt compelled to have it.  It's still only August, so there's a chance of a small harvest, plus some may remain in the ground for next year.  We'll see...

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #121 on: August 27, 2017, 06:07:16 PM »
Those grew quickly for you Ilinda, and they look very healthy indeed!

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #122 on: October 10, 2017, 07:19:25 AM »
Here is a recipe for Survival Bread that is supposed to supply all the nutrients needed (?) for an adult and last indefinitely.  For those who have been prepping a while, there comes a point when we realize that bread and dry starchy foods such as cereals, chips and crackers are the weak spot in long-term storage variety because the oils go rancid, and they are ever so costly to buy in the nitrogen flushed cans, at least in quantity.  It would be great if we could bake our starchy foods from scratch daily, but Marshall cautiously warns us not to count on it, at least not at first.  So this recipe could be made ahead of time and wrapped and stored in mouse-proof buckets.  It is not quite cool enough in the daytime here for me to begin baking again, but will hope to try it soon:

http://thereliantself.blogspot.com/2010/06/survival-bread.html


ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #123 on: October 10, 2017, 11:27:46 AM »
Here is a recipe for Survival Bread that is supposed to supply all the nutrients needed (?) for an adult and last indefinitely.  For those who have been prepping a while, there comes a point when we realize that bread and dry starchy foods such as cereals, chips and crackers are the weak spot in long-term storage variety because the oils go rancid, and they are ever so costly to buy in the nitrogen flushed cans, at least in quantity.  It would be great if we could bake our starchy foods from scratch daily, but Marshall cautiously warns us not to count on it, at least not at first.  So this recipe could be made ahead of time and wrapped and stored in mouse-proof buckets.  It is not quite cool enough in the daytime here for me to begin baking again, but will hope to try it soon:

http://thereliantself.blogspot.com/2010/06/survival-bread.html


From reading the ingredient list, it looks like oats, powdered milk and honey are the most nutritious ingredients.  I wonder, do you think the sugar is even needed, being that honey is sweet and contains mineral, vitamins, etc., while white sugar is empty calories?

At any rate, the most appealing thing is the indefinite storage life.  Thanks for posting!

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #124 on: October 10, 2017, 12:31:37 PM »
I feel the same way Ilinda, and would think the honey would be enough :)

MadMax

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #125 on: December 02, 2017, 06:20:10 AM »
http://bugout.news/2017-11-27-hogpocalypse-taking-over-texas-with-millions-of-wild-pigs-but-its-also-easy-wild-food-in-a-collapse.html

HOGpocalypse taking over Texas with millions of wild pigs… but it’s also easy wild food in a collapse

Wild pig populations in Texas are continuing to expand at a rapid pace. While this may not be the best news for farmers and landowners looking to secure their property, there is an upside to the proliferation of piggies: They are a great source of wild food.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #126 on: December 02, 2017, 08:55:47 AM »
Sounds like a win-win situation, if managed right!  :)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #127 on: December 02, 2017, 04:20:55 PM »
http://bugout.news/2017-11-27-hogpocalypse-taking-over-texas-with-millions-of-wild-pigs-but-its-also-easy-wild-food-in-a-collapse.html

HOGpocalypse taking over Texas with millions of wild pigs… but it’s also easy wild food in a collapse

Wild pig populations in Texas are continuing to expand at a rapid pace. While this may not be the best news for farmers and landowners looking to secure their property, there is an upside to the proliferation of piggies: They are a great source of wild food.

Max.
Not sure which is worse, Texas wild hog numbers or those in Missouri.  They are so destructive to native species, even eating fawns, plus they eat acorns, chestnuts, and most or all of the food for deer and turkey, native animals. 

And worst of all, they are so smart that hunting them with guns has quickly shown humans their resourcefulness.  Fire at one or two in a group of hogs, and even if you're a perfect shot, the rest of them scatter and become even more human-wary. 

Around here, multiple-animal traps are encouraged, and the kind with a spring trip which is located far from the entrance, so that as many pigs as possible enter the trap before the gate drops.  We trapped 39 one year, but only because of the spring-trap in a large pen.

Even the local conservation agency is warning against hunting them with guns, as it has been shown to actually increase their numbers, as each gun-toting human they encounter teaches them to be even more wary.

All of the wild ones around here are either black or muddy brown from rolling in their wallows.   See attached pics of some that were caught on our wildlife cam.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #128 on: December 02, 2017, 05:04:16 PM »
Ilinda, what did you do with the 39 that you caught?

Socrates

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Re: 'survival food' / wild hogs
« Reply #129 on: December 03, 2017, 12:10:26 AM »
Indeed; 39 pigs in one year... sounds like a business! How long to butcher one and deal with the harvest?

Reading the above, it sounds like a totally amazing strategy to have wild hogs around. Since hogs are omnivorous and have an amazing sense of smell that allows them to locate underground food sources, they probably take much better advantage of their environment than deer do. [Numbers would be nice in this regard; does anyone know how many animals per square mile can be harvested?] Squirrels, too, may be down in nuts, but a pig is a much better source of food, i should think. So in a survival situation, i'd rather the hogs get the nuts.

They are very smart creatures, surely one of the smartest on Earth, and to keep them penned up is therefore especially cruel. So cruel, in fact, that doing what's done to pigs in factories is so abhorrent i'd not even go there in a survival situation... Having a bunch of them running around making good use of a forest kinda sounds to me like the only way to go.
Smart or no, though, humans are much smarter still, so we can devise traps to catch them, even to do so humanely. The above actually sounds like a good model for acquiring food in hard times.
Thanks for the idea.

P.S. Thinking Joel Salatin on hogs, one might cordon off an area of forest and have the hogs live in there, moving the fencing around regularly so the area the hogs were before can recuperate from the destruction they cause. As Salatin puts it, nature is used to recuperating from 'natural catastrophes' and a hoard of hogs coming by can constitute just such a catastrophe for a (part of a) forest. Therefore, giving the forest a time to come back to life would likely improve it's productive capacity overal. As well, such a strategy might allow for other species to thrive alongside the hogs, so one might have deer and such as well [like what they call a guild in permaculture, in which the presence of other species can not only cause a greater total productivity, but even a greater productivity of each species reckoned separately].
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 09:26:00 AM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: 'survival food' / wild hogs
« Reply #130 on: December 03, 2017, 06:56:53 PM »
Indeed; 39 pigs in one year... sounds like a business! How long to butcher one and deal with the harvest?

Reading the above, it sounds like a totally amazing strategy to have wild hogs around. Since hogs are omnivorous and have an amazing sense of smell that allows them to locate underground food sources, they probably take much better advantage of their environment than deer do. [Numbers would be nice in this regard; does anyone know how many animals per square mile can be harvested?] Squirrels, too, may be down in nuts, but a pig is a much better source of food, i should think. So in a survival situation, i'd rather the hogs get the nuts.

They are very smart creatures, surely one of the smartest on Earth, and to keep them penned up is therefore especially cruel. So cruel, in fact, that doing what's done to pigs in factories is so abhorrent i'd not even go there in a survival situation... Having a bunch of them running around making good use of a forest kinda sounds to me like the only way to go.
Smart or no, though, humans are much smarter still, so we can devise traps to catch them, even to do so humanely. The above actually sounds like a good model for acquiring food in hard times.
Thanks for the idea.

P.S. Thinking Joel Salatin on hogs, one might cordon off an area of forest and have the hogs live in there, moving the fencing around regularly so the area the hogs were before can recuperate from the destruction they cause. As Salatin puts it, nature is used to recuperating from 'natural catastrophes' and a hoard of hogs coming by can constitute just such a catastrophe for a (part of a) forest. Therefore, giving the forest a time to come back to life would likely improve it's productive capacity overal. As well, such a strategy might allow for other species to thrive alongside the hogs, so one might have deer and such as well [like what they call a guild in permaculture, in which the presense of other species can not only cause a greater total productivity, but even a greater productivity of each species reckoned separately].
We had a sort of assemblyline of friends on our road.  The main hunter was glad to set up shop in his "Whiz Kid" (ramshackle shed he crudely hand-built).  Hunter would hang each carcass one at a time only, and proceed to do all the preliminary work (the hardest part), then large pieces would move to a table, where several guys would cut them into smaller pieces, then the weaker sex would be at the last table cutting into the right size for freezer bags.

It was more like a party atmosphere, with a bit of beer flowing, and we shared all of the meat with all of the people who worked.  Hunter has 3-4 chest freezers, so it was no problem storing them, as we would get three or four at a time, or as many as nine or eleven at one time.

Each "session" would occur after the trap was sprung, and it would be a most-of-the-day event.  The worst part was sensing the feelings of these animals who immediately know what's up, as soon as they see the hunters coming with guns.  One rather large male nearly cleared the 6' tall fence and most of them were charging the fence, in order to get out.  I kept eyeing up a cedar tree to climb in case a hog got out.  They're not afraid of us, when they're penned.  They're angry.  And I don't blame them.

One main problem with allowing the invasive non-native species to reproduce (and do they ever) is they have few predators around here.  Mountain lions can only eat so many, as their numbers aren't high enough yet, but wolves, if allowed to repopulate the area (they were here in MO until approx. the 1920's),  would be the perfect species to be allowed to repopulate this area, as they hunt in packs and could/would easily begin to whittle the hogs down to tolerable numbers...one would distract mom, while another would pick off a baby, and another....well you know how it goes.

Remember, hogs without predators will demolish any garden you have in minutes.  The damage a bunch of them can do in one evening truly boggles the mind.  It looks as if someone came in and plowed part of your field, but used a tractor with only three wheels!  OMG, what an uneven mess, and walking through the area the next day is hazardous to your health.  And wild hogs without predators can not only start to displace deer and turkey, but could actually have negative impact on oak tree reproduction--remember new oak trees come from acorns.  Right now our Missouri Department of Conservation has hired several sharpshooters whose sole job is to try to eliminate wild hogs from Missouri.  My own 2 cents is that without wolves, they are fighting a losing battle.  Wild hogs without controls could wipe out deer just as they had been eliminated from MO decades ago, as were turkey.  Both deer and turkey had to be re-introduced due to overharvest by humans.  But the same thing (overharvest) could occur by wild hogs.

Actually we've done a lot of recent re-fencing, leaving a rather small area that the hogs can access, but cannot reach the rest of the farm.  Our plan is to set up a smaller trap in our "open-access" area and wait for a visitor. 

I had been vegetarian for decades when we began to get wild hogs, and decided to taste it, and it was absolutely the best tasting, and smoothest-eating meat I can ever remember.  One thing some Louisiana hunters told us is that wild hogs taste gamey in their state because of their diet, whereas here in MO the acorns are plentiful and sweet, which makes delicious meat.

Sorry for the novelette, but hopefully this answered your questions.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #131 on: December 04, 2017, 05:30:49 AM »
Quote
I kept eyeing up a cedar tree to climb in case a hog got out.

 :D


ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #132 on: December 04, 2017, 06:10:36 PM »
Quote
I kept eyeing up a cedar tree to climb in case a hog got out.

 :D


LOL  LOL  ROFLMAO

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #133 on: December 05, 2017, 02:06:23 PM »
Admittedly the matching parasol may have been a bit much for farm attire   :D
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 03:14:06 PM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #134 on: December 05, 2017, 02:42:07 PM »
http://bugout.news/2017-11-27-hogpocalypse-taking-over-texas-with-millions-of-wild-pigs-but-its-also-easy-wild-food-in-a-collapse.html

HOGpocalypse taking over Texas with millions of wild pigs… but it’s also easy wild food in a collapse

Wild pig populations in Texas are continuing to expand at a rapid pace. While this may not be the best news for farmers and landowners looking to secure their property, there is an upside to the proliferation of piggies: They are a great source of wild food.

Max.

Max, I do not consume pork but it has proven to be a plentiful food source in the past and will be again. :)
In my survival group the main thing is people eat and stay alive.
As always some will be pets and some eaten. :)