Author Topic: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?  (Read 61413 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #270 on: March 04, 2017, 05:25:28 PM »
Talking about the some of our Native history and the Pipeline  11:30  216 views

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Published on Feb 25, 2017
Talking about the some of our Native history and the Pipeline....... Please subscribe for more. And thank you for being a part of this channel

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Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #272 on: March 04, 2017, 05:55:35 PM »
30th Annual Carolina Indian Circle Powwow  1:22
UNC-Chapel Hill


video link: https://youtu.be/UvzMpigbDuo

Published on Mar 4, 2017
Explore American Indian culture at the 30th Annual Carolina Indian Circle Powwow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #273 on: April 12, 2017, 02:43:16 AM »
http://standwithstandingrock.net/category/news/

Sen. Cantwell wants more details on Corps’ Dakota Access decisions
Posted on April 6, 2017

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., wants the chief of the Army Corps of Engineers to explain the agency’s decision-making that ultimately paved the way for completion of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline.

http://standwithstandingrock.net/sen-cantwell-wants-details-corps-dakota-access-decisions/




Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #274 on: April 12, 2017, 02:45:51 AM »
http://standwithstandingrock.net/category/news/

Standing Rock Sioux applauds BNP Paribas’ decision to divest from DAPL
Posted on April 5, 2017

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce BNP Paribas has sold its shares in the loan to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

http://standwithstandingrock.net/standing-rock-sioux-applauds-bnp-paribas-decision-divest-dapl/

Cannon Ball, N.D. — The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce BNP Paribas has sold its shares in the loan to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Representatives from the bank contacted the Tribe to share the news on Wednesday, April 5, 2017.

The Tribe commends the bank’s decision, which sends a strong message about the need for banks to respect Free, Prior and Informed Consent in their lending practices. BNP Paribas is the third bank in the DAPL loan consortium to divest, following similar actions by DNB and ING.

“As corporate greed continues to fuel dirty energy projects on our land, it is heartening to see that some banks recognize the imminent harm to our people posed by DAPL, and are taking actions accordingly,” said Dave Archambault, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “We appreciate BNP Paribas, ING and DNB leadership and their advanced understanding and respect of tribal sovereignty and Indigenous Peoples rights.”

The Tribe has met with the majority of project lenders to DAPL, but few have taken concrete actions. Later this month, tribal leaders will attend Wells Fargo’s annual meeting, where shareholders will vote on a proposal instructing the bank to improve its policies and practices on the rights of Indigenous Peoples. Similar proposals are being voted on by shareholders of Enbridge and Marathon Petroleum, two oil companies with minority ownership stakes in DAPL.

The Tribe will continue to pursue divestment, shareholder advocacy and other tactics to show that Energy Transfer Partners’ conduct is unacceptable business practice. The power of people speaking out against the Dakota Access Pipeline is greatly appreciated and today’s announcement by BNP Paribas is proof the fight continues and we look forward to further progress with the investment community, as well as in the courts.

###

Contact:
Chelsea Hawkins
chawkins@pyramidcommunications.com
206.556.1653

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #275 on: April 12, 2017, 02:56:27 AM »
Cloth - 2016 Pala Pow Wow - PowWows.com  2:49   21 views

Video link:  https://youtu.be/TSnPCh6R66A

Published on Apr 11, 2017
August 26-28, 2016
Pala, California

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #276 on: May 28, 2017, 01:42:45 PM »
http://nativenewsonline.net/  NATIVE NEWS ONLINE.NET

Celebrating Native Voices

THIS DAY IN HISTORY – MAY 28, 1830 ANDREW JACKSON SIGNS INDIAN REMOVAL ACT

BY LEVI RICKERT / CURRENTS / 28 MAY 2017

WASHINGTON – On this day in 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act.

The Act established a process whereby the president could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands. As incentives, the law allowed the Indians financial and material assistance to travel to their new locations and start new lives and guaranteed that the Indians would live on their new property under the protection of the United States Government forever.

WITH THE ACT IN PLACE, JACKSON AND HIS FOLLOWERS WERE FREE TO PERSUADE, BRIBE, AND THREATEN TRIBES INTO SIGNING REMOVAL TREATIES AND LEAVING THE SOUTHEAST.

By the end of his presidency, he had signed into law almost seventy removal treaties, the result of which was to move nearly 50,000 eastern Indians to Indian Territory—defined as the region belonging to the United States west of the Mississippi River but excluding the states of Missouri and Iowa as well as the Territory of Arkansas—and open millions of acres of rich land east of the Mississippi to white settlers. Despite the vastness of the Indian Territory, the government intended that the Indians’ destination would be a more confined area—what later became eastern Oklahoma.

The Indian Removal Act set in motion the Trail of Tears, which attributed to the genocide of thousands of American Indians and the death of one-quarter Cherokee people. For this reason, Jackson is referred to by American Indians as the “Indian-killer” president and does not feel he should be honored or celebrated in any fashion.

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #277 on: May 28, 2017, 06:49:54 PM »
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #279 on: June 02, 2017, 01:18:41 PM »
June 02, 1924 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act into law, granting citizenship to all Native Americans born within the territorial limits of the United States.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Citizenship_Act

The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924, also known as the Snyder Act, was proposed by Representative Homer P. Snyder (R) of New York and granted full U.S. citizenship to America's indigenous peoples, called "Indians" in this Act. While the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution defined as citizens any person born in the U.S., the amendment had been interpreted to restrict the citizenship rights of most Native people. The act was signed into law by President Calvin Coolidge on June 2, 1924. It was enacted partially in recognition of the thousands of Indians who served in the armed forces during World War I.

Legislative history
Introduced in the House as H.R. 6355 by Homer P. Snyder (R-NY) on February 22, 1924
Committee consideration by House Indian Affairs, Senate Indian Affairs
Passed the House on March 18, 1924 (Passed)
Passed the Senate on May 15, 1924 (Passed)
Agreed to by the House on May 23, 1924 (Agreed) and by the on 
Signed into law by President Calvin Coolidge on June 2, 1924

Note: Citizenship was granted in a piecemeal fashion before the Act, which was the first more inclusive method of granting Native American citizenship. The Act did not include citizens born before the effective date of the 1924 act, or outside of the United States as an indigenous person, however, and it was not until the Nationality Act of 1940 that all born on U.S. soil were citizens.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationality_Act_of_1940

[ More  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Citizenship_Act ]

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #280 on: June 02, 2017, 01:23:51 PM »
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #281 on: June 02, 2017, 05:31:42 PM »
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #282 on: June 02, 2017, 09:53:40 PM »
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.

Maybe because it was so Cal but yes it began to be covered at the community college level... 1962 my first Sociology class. The teacher, from England really got into it, the slave ships and all that.  The whole Native American experience seemed to be confronted a bit later.  Perhaps it was a decade later...  The Native American movement was in full swing in the early 19702.
Then when I went back to college again in 1999 perhaps it was the yr 2000 when I first knew over 20 million natives perished from white man's diseases... that is in north America central and south... I had no idea that many had perished.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #283 on: June 02, 2017, 10:00:07 PM »
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.

You can say that again, blah blah blah... All about white men...Barely mentioned women, even in 1962- 1966. I didn't realize until about 1967 how propagandized we all were... including sexism and racial stereotypes in the movies, etc.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #284 on: June 02, 2017, 10:37:08 PM »
On that note, time for a Pow wow video. :)
This not recent but it is is a long video:
...
Osage River Pow Wow    7:58    1,094 views

https://youtu.be/gUHtZj9myks

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