Author Topic: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?  (Read 60899 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #285 on: June 02, 2017, 10:59:49 PM »
Journey of the Osage 10:00   22,564 views

https://youtu.be/j_YiHIYmXn8

Uploaded on Apr 22, 2011
Made in conjunction with the Museum's 2004 exhibition entitled Art of the Osage, this video pairs visual imagery with interviews from tribal historians and members to provide a glimpse into the history of the Osage Indians. Using as a reference point the Native American tribe's past, including its forced displacement onto an Oklahoma reservation in the 19th century, the video paints a portrait of a modern, continuously evolving people.

R.R. Book

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #286 on: June 03, 2017, 08:25:00 AM »
Thanks for the lovely vid Barb!  I grew up near there, went to school with Native American kids from different tribes, and have some Cherokee ancestry as well. 

We used Howard Zinn's book as our home-schooling history text, and the boys chose their final research paper topics from passages in the book.  More here by Zinn on Native Americans: http://howardzinn.org/thanksgiving-resistance/








Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #287 on: June 04, 2017, 12:40:49 PM »
Thanks for the lovely vid Barb!  I grew up near there, went to school with Native American kids from different tribes, and have some Cherokee ancestry as well. 

We used Howard Zinn's book as our home-schooling history text, and the boys chose their final research paper topics from passages in the book.  More here by Zinn on Native Americans: http://howardzinn.org/thanksgiving-resistance/

R.R. I feel that is a wonderful thing, knowing you have Native American heritage!  :)
I have "felt" it since I was about four years old but parents said no... Finally I got a look at a closeup pic of my Grandpa Townsend. He looked to be part Native American and a touch of African American... I think we have hidden roots, middle eastern and sephardic (and Ashkenazi) Jewish. Some roots get lost.  ;)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #288 on: June 04, 2017, 03:45:45 PM »
Here is one take on Cherokee lineage. Jewish ancestry and origin of many Cherokee people, going back to 1500s, 1600s. Some of it as early as 1st - 8th century AD.

Back about 2004 I began doing ancestral studies (still mostly incomplete) and looking for hidden ethnic ancestry of various types.

I came across Melungeon data on Ancestry.com blogs, from a wonderful lady named Nancy Sparks-Morrison. She personally reached out to me and invited me to join her online group, Melungeons. The group no longer exists, Nancy has passed on. If you google Melungeons you will find gatherings, sites etc. One main concept is, Turks and Sephardic Jews were rescued from the Inquisition and dumped on the shores of America in the 1500s. After the persecution they experienced, some converted to Christianity (Primitive Babtist church) (possibly) Quakers etc. and others were crypto (hidden) Jews for centuries.  For an example there was a "Babtist" church in the south for centuries. About 2002-2005 time period they came out and announced they had been secret, "crypto" Jews for centuries, afraid of persecution. They renamed it a Temple...Read about it years ago, will post more later...

Many descendants of these Melungeon people just call themselves Irish or dutch and are Christians and have no idea of their ancestry. Some have hidden Roma gypsy, free African, turkish and/or Sephardic Jewish roots as well as the usual Scotch-Irish, Dutch etc.

I learned so much and have the (just an opinion) that my grandfather Townsend had Appalachian Melungeon roots. He did have sort of Asian eyes and coarse wiry hair which stood straight up until he began slicking it back. NA and African. As is typical for people of Melungeon ancestry we were told we only have "Irish, English, Dutch and German" ancestry.
The Melungeon theory is controversial, probably not accepted by mainstream science...
I have not done the DNA testing...
Book: The Melungeons: The Resurrection of a Proud People  I have posted about this elsewhere... Melungeon theory is tied up with NA heritage, true or not... still being discussed.
...
Short video... Hebrew-like inscriptions dating from 1st to 8th century AD. This is separate from the more recent possible influx of Jewish and Middle Eastern (Turks) influence in NA genetics and culture...  - Yowbarb 

Cherokee DNA from History Channel.wmv

https://youtu.be/wHNRf9H7nD4

Uploaded on Dec 16, 2010
The History Channel's recent documentary, Who Really Discovered America? asks some profound questions. Chief Joe Sitting Owl of the Central Band of Cherokee explains Cherokee oral history and tradition that they are from Jewish ancestry. Light skinned, the Cherokee don't look like most Native Americans of Asian ancestry. The Bat Creek stone, archaeologically removed from a Hopewell burial mound by the Smithsonian, has inscribed in ancient Hebrew the phrase "For Judea" or "For the Judeans." Only 3% of Chief Sitting Owls tribe had Jewish DNA, but 94% of those tested in the Central Band showed European DNA that goes back thousands of years. It is not widely known that haplogroup X is one of the 12 primary Jewish lineages, and is found in the Cherokee.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2017, 03:57:52 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #289 on: June 04, 2017, 03:59:04 PM »
Well I hope that post wasn't too confusing...  May re-do it later... :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #290 on: June 04, 2017, 04:10:06 PM »
Yowbarb Note: I decided to start a new topic called Melungeons.
There are some other posts about the subject scattered throughout the Town Hall.
Will try to get it all in the one topic.
...

SEE:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=6632.new#new  MELUNGEONS

R.R. Book

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #291 on: June 04, 2017, 05:22:27 PM »
Hey Barb,

Lots to chew on there.  Since the Primitive Baptists out East here conserved a lot of the Appalachian hymns, I've spent a number of years getting to know them and their traditions, which have been passed down through the non-denominational public hymn-sings that they help to spread.  Interestingly, and quite unlike Southern Baptists, their written creed says that they are the Chosen People / Elect and do not encourage converts, other than to draw in young singers to preserve the music and then take it back to their own communities. 

Regarding Cherokee genealogy and ethnicity: The Lenape/Delaware people, except for a small remnant, were "persuaded" to relocate from the Eastern PA area to live among the Cherokee in Oklahoma, and it's said that their lineages are so intertwined now that they cannot be easily untangled.  The French settlers here during the pre-removal Colonial era treated Natives as equals and sought out brides from among them, producing some happy family unions if I understand correctly.  That might help to explain the fair skin phenotype.  Howard Zinn did, however, mention that American Indians and free blacks also inter-married frequently.

Looking forward to more of your research on this!


Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #292 on: June 05, 2017, 07:48:37 PM »
Hey Barb,

Lots to chew on there.  Since the Primitive Baptists out East here conserved a lot of the Appalachian hymns, I've spent a number of years getting to know them and their traditions, which have been passed down through the non-denominational public hymn-sings that they help to spread.  Interestingly, and quite unlike Southern Baptists, their written creed says that they are the Chosen People / Elect and do not encourage converts, other than to draw in young singers to preserve the music and then take it back to their own communities. 

Regarding Cherokee genealogy and ethnicity: The Lenape/Delaware people, except for a small remnant, were "persuaded" to relocate from the Eastern PA area to live among the Cherokee in Oklahoma, and it's said that their lineages are so intertwined now that they cannot be easily untangled.  The French settlers here during the pre-removal Colonial era treated Natives as equals and sought out brides from among them, producing some happy family unions if I understand correctly.  That might help to explain the fair skin phenotype.  Howard Zinn did, however, mention that American Indians and free blacks also inter-married frequently.

Looking forward to more of your research on this!

R.R. that is so wonderful that you have met some of the Primitive Baptists
-  and - studied the Appalachian music.
I had heard that or seen it in movies, perhaps how the French trappers married Native American women...  Also, yes I read it on Melungeon sites how Appalachia was a real melting pot, Portuguese, some of whom Sephardic, marrying NA (and read some few Jewish tribes left) and intermarriage with some Roma, some Turks, Free African. I think I have all that ancestry but will probably never know... not total faith in DNA testing but will try.
BTW there is a lot of opposition online to anything to do with these Melungeon theories... Oh well. :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #293 on: June 16, 2017, 03:17:35 PM »
https://nativenewsonline.net/    Native News Online

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Fraizer Reacts to U.S. District Court DAPL Decision

Published June 16, 2017 EAGLE BUTTE, SOUTH DAKOTA – On June 14, 2017, a federal judge ruled in favor

EAGLE BUTTE, SOUTH DAKOTA – On June 14, 2017, a federal judge ruled in favor of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

The 91-page opinion stated “did not adequately consider” Tribal interests when making decisions regarding the permitting of the DAPL.

The ruling on Wednesday confirmed CRST’s allegations regarding the process used by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACoE) to permit the pipeline. Although the federal judge stopped short of shutting down the pipeline citing the need for another hearing next week.

“I HAVE ALWAYS HAD FAITH AND BELIEVED IN THE PEOPLE, TREATIES AND WATER PROTECTORS. THE PRAYERS OF MANY WERE ANSWERED WITH THIS DECISION. IT IS ONE VICTORY IN THE MANY BATTLES THAT WILL FACE OUR PEOPLE, BUT HISTORY HAS SHOWN THE WE WILL ALWAYS PREVAIL WITH UNITY AND PRAYER,” STATED CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE CHAIRMAN HAROLD FRAZIER.

Nicole Ducheneaux, an attorney for the CRST, stated “This is a major victory for all of Indian country, not just the Cheyenne River and Standing Rock Sioux Tribes, because it affirms that the United States must honor its solemn treaty obligations when it makes decisions that affect our resources.  While the Tribe is pleased, we also understand that we have won the battle, not the war.  In addition to the question of whether the oil should continue flowing, the Tribe remains concerned that the court has misunderstood the United States’ and the Corps’ trust responsibility to us.  There is a lot of fight left to fight.  We are ready.”

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #294 on: June 16, 2017, 03:21:11 PM »
Yowbarb Note: When it says, "The bill is cosponsored by the following representatives:" this means they are co sponsing the House Grijalva Bill which would REVERSE THE GIVEAWAY OF SACRED TRIBAL LANDS.  So the Representatives listed at the bottom of the article are supporting the  Tribe's position. Also, Senator Bernie Sanders, I, VT has introduced a companion Bill in the Senate today.
...

https://nativenewsonline.net/    Native News Online

https://nativenewsonline.net/currents/grijalva-bill-reverses-giveaway-sacred-tribal-land-foreign-owned-mining-company-sen-sanders-offering-senate-companion/

Grijalva Bill Reverses Giveaway of Sacred Tribal Land to Foreign-Owned Mining Company – Sen. Sanders Offering Senate Companion

BY NATIVE NEWS ONLINE STAFF / 16 JUN 2017

WASHINGTON – Ranking Member Raúl M. Grijalva today introduced the Save Oak Flat Act, which repeals an unjustified congressional giveaway of sacred Native American land to a mining company called Resolution Copper co-owned by multinational mining conglomerates Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is introducing a companion bill in the upper chamber today.

Section 3003 of the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act authorized the transfer of 2,422 acres in Arizona’s Tonto National Forest to Resolution Copper despite the area’s cultural importance to the San Carlos Apache and other local tribes in the region. The area, known as Oak Flat, has been home to tribal acorn gathering and traditional religious ceremonies for centuries. If Resolution Copper continues with its stated plans to establish a so-called block cave mine on the land, its environmental and cultural value will be destroyed.

Grijalva’s bill – a successor to his H.R. 2811 from the 114th Congress – would repeal section 3003, which has no connection to national defense. Grijalva has taken a leading lawmaker role in the ongoing Save Oak Flat movement and hosted a congressional forum on the issue in the last Congress.

“Using our military as an excuse to give sacred land away to a mining company is a cynical abuse of power,” Grijalva said today. “This is exactly the kind of Beltway corporate favoritism the American people can’t stand, and it needs to be undone immediately. Supporting this bill means standing up for tribal sovereignty and environmental quality. Opposing it means handing American resources over to a multinational conglomerate with no interest in our economy, let alone American Indian rights.”

“Too many times our Native American brothers and sisters have seen the profits of huge corporations put ahead of their sovereign rights,” Sen. Sanders said. “It is wrong that a backroom deal in Washington could lead to the destruction of a sacred area that is so important to so many. We must defend the hundreds of thousands of Americans who are standing in opposition to this giveaway of our natural resources to foreign corporations.”

Resolution’s proposed mine is directly adjacent to Apache Leap, a beautiful escarpment of unique archeological and historical significance, where Apaches pursued by the U.S. cavalry leapt to their deaths to avoid capture. Vernelda Grant, the tribal historic preservation officer for the San Carlos Apache Tribe, expressed concern in the respected journal Science in 2014 that, as the magazine put it, the mine is “right next door” to Apache Leap and “having a working copper mine next to the site will change how people experience it.”

Section 3003 is strongly opposed by Indian tribes across the country because of the dangerous precedent it has set. By requiring the conveyance of the land regardless of the outcome of mandated federal consultation with affected tribes, it allows Congress essentially to ignore the basic principles of federal-tribal relations. The language also requires the conveyance regardless of the outcome of a mandatory environmental review process, ignoring decades of environmental precedent requiring advance land and water impact analyses so that these analyses can help inform decision-makers about potential impacts from proposed activities before decisions are made that could have irreversible consequences.

The bill is cosponsored by the following representatives:

Grace F. Napolitano (D-Calif.)

Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.)

Mark Pocan (D-Wisc.)

Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.)

Tom Cole (R-Okla.)

Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.)

Walter B. Jones (R-N.C.)

Donald S. Beyer, Jr. (D-Va.)

Peter A. DeFazio (D-Oregon)

Diana DeGette (D-Colo.)

Jared Huffman (D-Calif.)

Ruben Gallego (D-Ariz.)

Norma J. Torres (D-Calif.)

Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.)

Niki Tsongas (D-Mass.)

Ted W. Lieu (D-Calif.)

Suzan K. DelBene (D-Wash.)

Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.)

Betty McCollum (D-Minn.)

Derek Kilmer (D-Wash.)

Alan Lowenthal (D-Calif.)

Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon)

Jared Polis (D-Colo.)

Raul Ruiz (D-Calif.)

Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md.)

Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.)

Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.)

Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-N.M.)

Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan (D-Mariana Islands)

Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #295 on: July 30, 2017, 10:07:37 PM »
VIDEO:

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2017/05/10/kamau-bell-native-americans-united-shades-orig-wl.cnn

A hard look at the treatment of Native Americans
United Shades of America

W. Kamau Bell explores the causes behind poverty, unemployment and crime among the country's indigenous people. "United Shades of America" airs Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.Source: CNN

R.R. Book

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #296 on: August 02, 2017, 10:05:04 AM »
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 10:22:35 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #297 on: August 02, 2017, 04:19:06 PM »
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States
Amazing laws that had been passed, eh?  We recently watched a Netflix series on slavery in the U.S., and OMG was it an eye-opener, especially the part about the laws passed that criminalized teaching Blacks to read.  It is easy to see why Black Studies programs now exist, as mainstream education has always downplayed the genocidal and otherwise horrific treatment of any non-whites.  And still it lives.

Thanks for sharing the photo of your lovely great grandma.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #298 on: October 19, 2017, 02:19:29 PM »
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States

Wow, RR how did I miss your wonderful post?  You can be so proud of your Native American heritage and your ancestor. I would love to know that, for sure. :) Here is my hs pic...In my thirties, some said I looked just slightly NA with cheekbones, texture of hair and etc. My hair is fairly straight but thick and a little coarse... skin is white, no record of NA heritage although Grandfather looked part.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 02:29:32 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #299 on: October 19, 2017, 02:23:09 PM »
http://www.cherokee.org/Services/Tribal-Citizenship/Citizenship

Cherokee Nation citizenship law is set by tribal law. There is no minimum blood quantum required for citizenship. Tribal citizenship requires that you have at least one direct ancestor listed on the Dawes Final Rolls, a federal census of those living in the Cherokee Nation that was used to allot Cherokee land to individual citizens in preparation for Oklahoma statehood in 1907.

To be eligible for Cherokee Nation tribal citizenship, you must be able to provide documents that connect you to a direct ancestor listed on one of the Dawes Final Rolls of Citizens of the Cherokee Nation. To be eligible for a federal Certificate Degree of Indian Blood, you must demonstrate through documentation that you descend directly from a person listed on the Dawes’ “by Blood” rolls. This group of census rolls were taken between 1899-1906 of Citizens and Freedmen residing in Indian Territory (now northeastern Oklahoma).  If your ancestor did not live in this geographical area during that time period, they will not be listed on the Dawes Rolls.

More excerpts:
If you need help with your research, please contact the Family Research office at the Cherokee Heritage Center, 918-456-6007, or at the following link: http://www.cherokeeheritage.org.   NOTE: Genealogist assisted research is a fee-based service. The Heritage Center is not able to provide research assistance by phone because of high demand and time involved.

Also, you may visit the following website: http://guides.tulsalibrary.org/genealogy

You can access the DAWES ROLLS at:

www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.htm
 or www.okhistory.org/research/dawes (fee may be required)

       General Contact for the Cherokee Nation Registration Office
        registration@cherokee.org  918-458-6980 OR 1-800-256-0671