Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 41491 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #165 on: February 27, 2016, 05:51:44 PM »
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #166 on: February 28, 2016, 03:28:06 PM »
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.


steedy

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #167 on: February 29, 2016, 03:45:05 PM »
I have heard so much about rose hips that I am going to use it in my herbal treatments.  But I thought it grew wild and I was going to have to find it somewhere in the woods, but I found out you can order seeds for it and grow it on your property.  I'm pretty excited about this.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #168 on: March 01, 2016, 07:44:51 AM »
I have heard so much about rose hips that I am going to use it in my herbal treatments.  But I thought it grew wild and I was going to have to find it somewhere in the woods, but I found out you can order seeds for it and grow it on your property.  I'm pretty excited about this.
Wild roses will have rose hips, so if you have wild roses in your new area, you're "in"!  IIRC, they are blooming by June around here in southern MO and on some roadsides they are profuse where they are far enough from the pavement and shoulder that they are never mowed and are allowed to bramble and be beautiful, especially where they are against a rock outcropping.

Good luck with growing them, but also with finding some wild ones as your backup.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #169 on: March 01, 2016, 08:18:32 AM »
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 08:29:58 AM by Yowbarb »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #170 on: March 04, 2016, 07:27:15 AM »
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
Mom was diagnosed with dementia, but they never used the term Alzheimer's Disease.  She fell one day while en route to the mailbox, a 1/2-mile walk down the driveway.  She was always "in a hurry" and her doctor later even demonstrated for her how her center of gravity was out of kilter because the upper half of her body was always ahead of the rest! 
That altered center of gravity caused her to lurch forward when she fell, smacking her forehead flat on the ground, and she ended up with lots of bruises, etc., but nothing broken.  It was hubby who commented on how the dementia seemed to appear after that head injury and then a bit of research on dementia revealed a list of six or seven factors that seem to increase one's risk of dementia, one of which was a frontal lobe injury.  She did live to 92 and most of the years were good.

Your parents were equally lucky to be blessed with old age.

I tried to grow Astragulus and Ashwaghanda once (IIRÇ) and neither grew here.  IIRC the astragalus needs sandy soil and cannot recall about the Ashwagandha, but want to try again.  IIRC you mentioned wanting to have it or grow it.  Let us know how it goes.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #171 on: March 06, 2016, 07:15:21 PM »
ilinda, that's good to know!
I feel a lot of Americans need to work to heal their brains from poor diet and also to help them prevent Alzheimers. I am going to get some Ashwaganda.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/04/07/ashwaganda-effect-on-alzheimers-disease.aspx
Kind of makes you want to grow Ashwaganda as a "houseplant".  So much we Westerners need to learn about our bodies and our entire world.
Linda, I feel I definitely need to grow it... I don't want to suddenly loose my marbles or my memory...
I agree with you, we have much to learn, still from the Eastern world.
:)
Glad you brought up the topic of memory.  Don't you think that there are many signs, way ahead of time, that the memory is going?  Or, maybe that the "mind" is going?  Here's why I say this.  When mom moved from FL to live on our farm, in 1994, I noticed a difference in her logic that I'd never seen before.  It was slightly out of kilter, or skewed, or somehow not quite right.  All else seemed the same.  I can give an example, but that's a good way to condense the idea I'm trying to convey.
But it was at least five years later that memory loss began to creep in, and in fact, shortly after a hard fall causing a frontal lobe injury, something known to be implicated in later dementia, (but not always) is when the memory loss really became obvious.  But because of her slightly flawed logic, I wonder if she was headed in the direction of memory loss anyway, but will never know. 

So, one clue might be altered and seemingly flawed logic (seemingly to others).  But I didn't start her on turmeric until after the memory loss became obvious.  Too late, no doubt.

Was your Mother diagnosed with Dementia?
Also Alzheimers? Just wondering, I hope you don't mind my asking.
My Father had Alzheimers and I saw some clues decades earlier but he was able to function and take care of the household bills and maintenance until he was well past 84. Then suddenly he wasn't able to do these things. He never did lose his ability to carry on a conversation, was still witty at times and remembered everyone...
You mention your Mother had a head injury, that's sad.
My Father had some lumber slip out of place and go onto onto his head, which gave him quite a jolt. After that the Alzheimers did show up more quickly...I mean it accelerated. He was able to continue taking supplements, Coenzyme Q10 until he had his system failing (atherosclerosis can suddenly bring about heart and kidney failure.) at that point he could no longer tolerate the supplements...
We are so grateful he manage to pretty much be himself up to the end...We feel he did pretty good nearly made it to 86. My Mother had forgetful spells but did not have Alzheimers and made it to age 90 without having to go to nursing care or the hospital... Honestly I do feel the Coenzyme Q10 and multiple supplements helped them do as well as they did, Bless them.
Getting back to Ashwagandha - anyone planning to grow some?
Mom was diagnosed with dementia, but they never used the term Alzheimer's Disease.  She fell one day while en route to the mailbox, a 1/2-mile walk down the driveway.  She was always "in a hurry" and her doctor later even demonstrated for her how her center of gravity was out of kilter because the upper half of her body was always ahead of the rest! 
That altered center of gravity caused her to lurch forward when she fell, smacking her forehead flat on the ground, and she ended up with lots of bruises, etc., but nothing broken.  It was hubby who commented on how the dementia seemed to appear after that head injury and then a bit of research on dementia revealed a list of six or seven factors that seem to increase one's risk of dementia, one of which was a frontal lobe injury.  She did live to 92 and most of the years were good.

Your parents were equally lucky to be blessed with old age.

I tried to grow Astragulus and Ashwaghanda once (IIRÇ) and neither grew here.  IIRC the astragalus needs sandy soil and cannot recall about the Ashwagandha, but want to try again.  IIRC you mentioned wanting to have it or grow it.  Let us know how it goes.

ilinda, thanks for sharing about your Mother. That is fortunate she had mostly good years and lived so long. That's a Blessing.
Thanks for the info...we have sandy soil here so maybe I can grow the Astragulus.
I haven't been good at growing things, I mean I haven't been getting to it. I know I have a natural green thumb but seems all my activities are not in that down to earth area... I have grown some things and they like, sprang out of the earth, so I know I have a feeling for it...
It is very healing, too...

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #172 on: April 21, 2016, 04:00:39 AM »
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer 

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #173 on: April 21, 2016, 04:42:57 AM »
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer
One good thing is that these Turkey Tails are so common.  Very common.  I can't walk the woods without seeing some.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #174 on: May 04, 2016, 01:08:12 AM »
http://www.fungi.com/  See Turkey Tail Mushroom

also: ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer
One good thing is that these Turkey Tails are so common.  Very common.  I can't walk the woods without seeing some.

That's wonderful!
I heard about them used to help cure cancer, from my third-born daughter Jessica. :)

Jimfarmer

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #175 on: April 04, 2017, 09:16:28 PM »
I found this article today:

"Ten of the Most Powerful All-Natural Antibiotics Known to Man" at https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia2/ciencia_healthyfood33.htm

They are:
Oregano Essential Oil
Apple Cider Vinegar
Raw Honey
Garlic
Colloidal Silver
Ginger Extract
Onion Extract
Horseradish Root
Habanero Peppers
Turmeric

matrixsojourner

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Healing plants, herbs and foods - Turmeric and ginger root tea
« Reply #176 on: May 18, 2017, 07:40:42 PM »
Last month I added turmeric root and ginger root tea to my morning repertoire. It has greatly helped with inflammation and the daily aches and pains of just getting older. I have experienced less stiffness (especially in the morning) and can make it through to retiring to bed relatively pain free. I usually would take Goody powder or an NSAID a couple of times a day which was hard on my stomach. It was recommended to me by a bodybuilder friend who is 53 that said along with matcha tea, he gets through his day, the workouts and post-workout without any soreness and more energy than he has ever felt. I plan to grow some turmeric root. Word of advice: when slicing the root I recommend gloves since it will stain your hands yellow-orange. Badly. A tea is far more beneficial than the capsule supplements I was taking. I highly recommend turmeric and am so happy I tried it!

2 cups of water
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric root
1/2 teaspoon chopped ginger
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
1 Tablespoon of honey
1 lemon wedge

*maple syrup may be substituted for honey if desired

Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan; add turmeric, ginger, and cinnamon. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain tea into a large glass; add honey and lemon wedge. Source: allrecipes.com



Anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric and ginger

The anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric and ginger have been well researched and documented. By using the herbs separately or in a combination such as in turmeric and ginger tea, you can help reduce inflammation and relieve pain in your body.

The journal Advances in Pharmacological Studies reported that extracts of turmeric have been used for centuries to treat inflammatory conditions. Among some of these are joint swelling, indigestion, irritable bowel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Similarly, ginger is viewed as a medicinal herb with broad anti-inflammatory actions. The Journal of Medicinal Food published information that ginger has a similar effect to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in reducing pain and inflammation. The journal reported that the advantage of ginger over NSAIDs is that there are fewer side effects from using ginger to reduce pain and inflammation.

Boosts brain power

Turmeric and ginger have a positive effect on cognitive power and have an antioxidant effect against some neurological diseases.

For example, research has found that the compound 6-shogaol in ginger has an anti-inflammatory effect on neurological processes and can help to reduce memory impairment and the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Other studies have shown that ginger extracts improve the cognitive function of middle-aged women.

Turmeric has also shown to have a positive neuro-effect on people with dementia. A study showed that Alzheimer’s patients who took turmeric supplements for over a year showed significant signs of improvement.

Another study reported that in countries where turmeric is used in cooking (for example in India where curry is popular), fewer people suffer from dementia than in western countries.10

Helps digestion

Ginger on its own or a combination of ginger and turmeric can help to relieve many digestion issues.

A study from 2008 found that ginger has a positive effect on your gastrointestinal system and can help food pass through the intestines easier.

Other studies have confirmed that ginger reduces inflammation in the digestive tract and can prevent and treat indigestion.

Ginger also helps to prevent nausea and vomiting due to its power to soothe the intestines. This also helps reduce abdominal pain, stomach cramping, and other symptoms of gastric distress.

Turmeric also has an anti-inflammatory effect on the digestive system. Among the digestive diseases that curcumin has proved to be effective in helping to treat are irritable bowel disease, indigestion, stomach ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Crohn’s disease. 

Improves heart health and lowers blood pressure

A very important health benefit of both ginger and turmeric is their ability to naturally improve cardiovascular health.

The International Journal of Cardiology published studies on how curcumin extracts have protective effects on heart health. Among these are reducing the risk of blood clots, preventing irregular heartbeat, and having an anti-inflammatory effect on the cardiovascular system

Source: healthyandnaturalworld.com



Live long and prosper.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #177 on: May 19, 2017, 12:46:28 AM »
Welcome to the Planet X Town Hall, matrixsojourner. :)
What a great post!
Glad you are here.
 - Barb Townsend

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #178 on: May 23, 2017, 08:35:09 AM »
Quote
In folklore it is even claimed to be able to cure snakebite.

Barb, we have rattlesnakes and copperheads here, and because snake venom's toxicity is due in large part to very complex protein molecules ( http://www.jbc.org/content/278/41/40097.full.html ), we keep chewable papaya and pineapple enzymes on hand at all times, to use as documented in these references:

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/10091/1/IJEB%2048%289%29%20865-878.pdf

http://astore.amazon.com/wsdm-20/detail/013385857X/104-6745254-8710355

http://www.digherbs.com/papaya.html

http://thecompleteherbalguide.com/entries/digestive/digestion-problems/

Papain is one of the ingredients of a current allopathic anti-venon treatment : https://poisoncontrol.utah.edu/newsletters/pdfs/toxicology-today-archive/Vol3_No1.pdf

http://www.surgicalcriticalcare.net/Guidelines/envenomation%202010.pdf

Here is another good reason to keep your own anti-venon supply of papain or bromelain on hand:

 Unfortunately,  production  of  Antivenin Micrurus   Fulvius,   the   only   coral   snake   antivenom   currently   available   in   the   United   States,   was discontinued  by  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals  in  2003.    The  last  remaining  Antivenin  (Lot  No.  4030026)  was initially dated to expire on October 31, 2008.  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals, in conjunction  with the U.S. Food and Drug  Administration (FDA) has currently  extended the expiration date to October 31, 2011 (9).  Thecost of Antivenin Micrurus Fulvius is currently $1513.63 per vial.   If  no  other  coral  snake  antivenom  is  approved  when the  current  supply  is  exhausted  or  expires, physicians  will  have  to  rely  on  supportive  care  or non-FDA  approved  antivenom.   

In other words, if you get bitten by a snake, and are able to identify what bit you, there is no guarantee that your hospital will have any or the correct anti-venon in supply.

And yet two more reasons:
The average cost to treat a venomous snake bite can be between $15,000 and $20,000 without medical complications, but almost halfof the treated bites can become complicated, e.g., an allergic reaction to horse-based sera or to the venom itself. http://www.thebestcontrol.com/lice-chapter/Chapter16.pdf

Instead of taking just one or two tablets as advised on the supplement bottle, best to chew them in larger amounts.  Papaya has a GRAS rating (generally recognized as safe) in the medical community, and one study safely used a 4g dose ( https://www.drugs.com/npp/papaya.html ).  Both snake venom and papaya or pineapple enzymes can thin the blood, so avoid blood thinners such as vitamin E, and once the immediate crisis is over, might want to supplement vitamin K and/or eat yogurt for the clotting factor.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #179 on: May 23, 2017, 05:04:56 PM »
Quote
In folklore it is even claimed to be able to cure snakebite.

Barb, we have rattlesnakes and copperheads here, and because snake venom's toxicity is due in large part to very complex protein molecules ( http://www.jbc.org/content/278/41/40097.full.html ), we keep chewable papaya and pineapple enzymes on hand at all times, to use as documented in these references:

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/10091/1/IJEB%2048%289%29%20865-878.pdf

http://astore.amazon.com/wsdm-20/detail/013385857X/104-6745254-8710355

http://www.digherbs.com/papaya.html

http://thecompleteherbalguide.com/entries/digestive/digestion-problems/

Papain is one of the ingredients of a current allopathic anti-venon treatment : https://poisoncontrol.utah.edu/newsletters/pdfs/toxicology-today-archive/Vol3_No1.pdf

http://www.surgicalcriticalcare.net/Guidelines/envenomation%202010.pdf

Here is another good reason to keep your own anti-venon supply of papain or bromelain on hand:

 Unfortunately,  production  of  Antivenin Micrurus   Fulvius,   the   only   coral   snake   antivenom   currently   available   in   the   United   States,   was discontinued  by  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals  in  2003.    The  last  remaining  Antivenin  (Lot  No.  4030026)  was initially dated to expire on October 31, 2008.  Wyeth  Pharmaceuticals, in conjunction  with the U.S. Food and Drug  Administration (FDA) has currently  extended the expiration date to October 31, 2011 (9).  Thecost of Antivenin Micrurus Fulvius is currently $1513.63 per vial.   If  no  other  coral  snake  antivenom  is  approved  when the  current  supply  is  exhausted  or  expires, physicians  will  have  to  rely  on  supportive  care  or non-FDA  approved  antivenom.   

In other words, if you get bitten by a snake, and are able to identify what bit you, there is no guarantee that your hospital will have any or the correct anti-venon in supply.

And yet two more reasons:
The average cost to treat a venomous snake bite can be between $15,000 and $20,000 without medical complications, but almost halfof the treated bites can become complicated, e.g., an allergic reaction to horse-based sera or to the venom itself. http://www.thebestcontrol.com/lice-chapter/Chapter16.pdf

Instead of taking just one or two tablets as advised on the supplement bottle, best to chew them in larger amounts.  Papaya has a GRAS rating (generally recognized as safe) in the medical community, and one study safely used a 4g dose ( https://www.drugs.com/npp/papaya.html ).  Both snake venom and papaya or pineapple enzymes can thin the blood, so avoid blood thinners such as vitamin E, and once the immediate crisis is over, might want to supplement vitamin K and/or eat yogurt for the clotting factor.
Excellent information, RR, and thanks for educating us a bit more.  So I'll be looking for organic papaya and pineapple for drying, but must first do a bit of research to see if slow, low-temp. drying harms the enzymes.  My best guess is "no".

I haven't read your links yet, but do you think the blood thinning aspect is the main way the antivenin works?  Or is there something else at work as well?