Author Topic: Extreme weather Asia  (Read 2746 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #45 on: July 08, 2015, 05:46:11 AM »
From Ben Davidson (Suspicious0bservers) -
[triple storm threat converging up north - a big concern for Japan]

Electric Fields, Space Weather | S0 News July 8, 2015     3:44      301+ views

LINK:  https://youtu.be/GaLI6WbqlKI

Published on Jul 8, 2015
Observing the Frontier Conference:  https://www.eventjoy.com/e/suspicious0bservers
www.Suspicious0bservers.org

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #46 on: July 08, 2015, 06:03:38 AM »
Image at bottom of post: The pressure-controlled water tank at the Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge Channel in Kasukabe, north of Tokyo. Photograph: Ho New/Reuters

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jul/07/tokyo-guerrilla-rainstorms-japan-resilience

Tokyo readies for the rise of the 'guerrilla rainstorm'

Japan’s capital may be known for its earthquake resilience strategies, but a recent increase in intense, sudden storms poses another threat – one that the city’s flood protection systems may not be able to manage

Philip Brasor and Masako Tsubuku
Tuesday 7 July 2015 02.00 EDT

When people speak of natural disasters in Tokyo, they usually mean the major earthquake that seismologists say will eventually strike the Japanese capital. But for the local government, weather-related disasters are as much if not more of an immediate worry. The city’s coastal location puts it in the path of the Asia-Pacific region’s most violent typhoons – and there has been a measurable increase in the strength of rainstorms in recent years.

Tokyo’s rainfall in 2014 was about 20% above normal, but the kind of storms that have struck the capital lately are different than they were in the past. Many are caused by huge cumulus clouds that form quickly and in succession when moist air from the ocean comes up against the warm air trapped among tall, closely packed buildings. Locally, these sudden, intense downpours are called “guerrilla” storms, because they seem to attack out of nowhere.

Two years ago, four workers who were reinforcing storm sewers drowned when such a storm hit unexpectedly. The main problem in these situations is that Tokyo is covered with concrete and has many levels of underground infrastructure: there is no ground soil to absorb water. The city has two sewer systems, one for runoff and one for sewage, and when rainfall exceeds 50mm/hour the water is diverted automatically into the sewage channels, which fill up and have to be diverted into the sea, meaning raw sewage ends up in the environment without being treated. Last year, during one storm, Taito Ward in eastern Tokyo received 150mm in one hour.

About 30% of the prefecture’s population lives below sea level, mostly along Tokyo Bay or the many rivers that feed into it. The levees that were built roughly 300 years ago to protect the downstream areas haven’t always been sufficient. In 1948, Typhoon Kathleen submerged most of the northwestern portion of the city under three metres of water when the Tone River breached its banks. More than 1,000 people died and 31,000 homes were destroyed. The storm was considered a once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon, and the low-lying areas have become even more populated in the intervening years, with landfill extending far into the bay. Levees have been reinforced, but the metropolitan government knows it is not enough.

One of the biggest recent flood prevention projects is an underground discharge channel that was completed six years ago about 25 miles north of the city in Kasukabe. The structure feeds overflow from five rivers into a man-made underground reservoir through a huge shaft and a tunnel more than 4 miles in length. Four pumps can handle as much as 200 cubic metres of water a second. The mechanism goes a long way toward diverting excess water that flows down from the upper reaches of the Kanto Plain, but may have less effect in the event of heavy rains that fall directly on the city.
Ward governments have asked private property owners to build special runoff systems under their land so that when there is excess rain it can be absorbed into the soil, alleviating the city’s burden for runoff. Some even offer to subsidise such construction, but without regulations that compel landowners to do so, few have undertaken the work.

Experts don’t think that structural precautions alone can safeguard a city such as Tokyo from extraordinary storms

Another flood-prevention project is the “super levees” that the central government is attempting to build along 540 miles of six rivers. The work involves increasing the elevation of existing levees. But if they are made higher, the base has to be widened in order for them to maintain their structural integrity, and since tightly packed residential neighbourhoods are already situated along the levees, houses have to be condemned and residents forced to move when the work is carried out. Japan has a very weak concept of eminent domain, and between the late 1980s when the project began and 2012 when it was suspended temporarily due to budget concerns, only 5.4% of the planned work had been done. At that rate it will take 400 years to complete, and many people in and out of the government believe the project is merely a public works boondoggle that has more to do with enriching construction companies than with saving lives.

In any case, experts don’t think that structural precautions alone can safeguard a city such as Tokyo from extraordinary storms. This spring, Japan’s public broadcaster, NHK, aired a series of special programmes on “mega-disasters”, one of which addressed guerrilla rainstorms and “super typhoons”. Worst case scenarios were simulated using computer graphics, showing how subways and underground spaces would be completely inundated and streets submerged under at least three metres of water. Though such a situation would be rare, it is also seen as inevitable. Consequently, more research has gone into predicting heavy rainfall, especially when it’s focused on a small area.
As NHK pointed out, the best way to save lives is to make sure residents know when a storm is coming and what they can expect in their area. Local governments distribute “hazard maps” that tell residents whether or not their localities are subject to inundation, whether by overwhelmed sewers or by overflowing tributaries. Combined with a storm prediction system, residents can evacuate when a warning is given. This summer, a system devised by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism that predicts rain storms of more than 30mm/hour is being tested that can give ten minute warnings to affected areas.

Ten minutes isn’t much time, but if people decide to evacuate, where do they go, especially if they live in a neighbourhood that’s below sea level? Local governments designate evacuation points in multi-story public buildings, such as schools, but depending on where a resident lives it could be a long walk – and authorities warn against moving around outside during a flood. Some communities are making their own arrangements. Yoshii Ishii, the 83-year-old head of the neighbourhood association of Minami Senju, a cramped warren of wooden houses located near the Sumida River, told us three years ago that he had come to an understanding with several high-rise condominiums that had been built in the area since 2000. “We had a meeting,” he said. “They said we can use their building in the event of an emergency.”

The proliferation of tower condos in recent years has been controversial for their performance in earthquakes, but tall buildings also exacerbate the heat island phenomenon that contributes to guerrilla storms. For the residents of Minami Senju, however, skyscrapers make up for the flooding they could be indirectly causing by providing higher, drier ground.

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #47 on: July 24, 2015, 03:38:40 AM »
TYPHOON 1512 (HALOLA) - image from JMA

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/typh/

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #48 on: July 25, 2015, 01:54:00 PM »
http://www.usno.navy.mil/JTWC/

Tropical Storm 01C (Halola) Warning #63
Issued at 25/2100Z
http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/warnings/cp0115.gif  Tropical Storm

It looks like TD 12 moving away from the Philippines

http://www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/ab/abpwweb.txt

...TROPICAL DEPRESSION 12W (TWELVE) WAS LOCATED AT 250000Z, TROPICAL DEPRESSION 12W (TWELVE) WAS LOCATED NEAR 18.2N 125.9E, APPROXIMATELY 355 NM NORTHEAST OF MANILA, PHILIPPINES, AND HAD TRACKED EAST-NORTHEASTWARD AT 08 KNOTS OVER THE PAST SIX HOURS.

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #49 on: September 03, 2015, 01:26:25 AM »
https://www.veooz.com/news/tJdNL0L.html

Hurricane "Kilo" becomes a typhoon after crossing the International Date Line

Investmentwatchblog  · 11 hrs ago

Hurricane "Kilo" formed over 1 000 km (621 miles) of the shore of Hawaii islands in the late August and has crossed an International Date Line between the eastern and western Pacific between September 1 and 2, 2015. It, thus, became known as a Typhoon "Kilo". Although, the system currently doesn't pose a threat to mainland, it requires careful monitoring as it is expected to intensify and pass close to Japan during the next week. Typhoon "Kilo", formerly know as a Hurricane "Kilo" first appeared as a tropical depression about 1 127 km (700 miles) south-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii islands, on August 20, 2015.

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #50 on: September 28, 2015, 01:55:58 AM »
Powerful Typhoon Dujuan closing in on Taiwan in the Pacific

强大台风杜鹃逼近台湾在太平洋地区

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #51 on: November 04, 2015, 09:44:07 AM »
المكلا

03 Nov 2015 | Flooding: Cyclone Chapala in Mukalla, Yemen #المكلا‬‎ #Chapala #Mukalla 2:51  9,158 views

https://youtu.be/M3BR57lxY4k

Published on Nov 3, 2015
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-...
A rare tropical cyclone is bearing down on the Yemeni mainland bringing hurricane-force winds, heavy rain and powerful waves.
Photos and videos posted online showed water pouring through the streets of the southern coastal city of Mukalla



Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #52 on: January 23, 2016, 12:03:58 AM »
I don't know what the ___ this is, yet. looks like a monster typhoon in the Indian Ocean.
OK it is called TC 085 (Corentin) on the JTWC.
..................................................................................
http://www.goes.noaa.gov/FULLDISK/GIVS.JPG

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #53 on: June 29, 2016, 03:19:31 AM »
I just saw this ... happened a few days ago...
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Jiangsu_tornado

2016 Jiangsu tornado
A tornado kills at least 98 people and injures approximately 800 others in Jiangsu Province, China.

On the afternoon of June 23, 2016, a severe thunderstorm produced a large, violent tornado over Jiangsu province, China. Striking areas along the outskirts of Yancheng around 2:30 p.m. local time, the tornado killed at least 99 people and injured 846 others (152 critically). The China Meteorological Administration later ranked the tornado as an EF4 on the Enhanced Fujita scale.
.........
Visible satellite image of an intense thunderstorm complex over eastern China at 5:25 UTC on June 23, 2016. One storm produced a strong tornado about one hour later that caused extensive damage in Jiangsu province.

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #54 on: September 14, 2016, 02:16:46 AM »
Asian typhoons are becoming more frequent and intense, researchers say

Avaneesh Pandey
International Business Times
Tue, 06 Sep 2016 06:37 UTC

The impact of warming oceans on fragile marine organisms such as corals is already well-documented. What is less well-known is the effect of warming seas on the intensity and destructive power of tropical cyclones pummeling the coastlines of countries in east and southeast Asia.

In a new study based on data collected by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center — managed by the U.S. Navy and Air Force — and the Japan Meteorological Agency, two researchers have found that over the past 40 years, typhoons in the northwest Pacific have intensified by 12 to 15 percent on average. In addition, the proportion of category 4 and 5 typhoons — those with wind speed between 130 and 156 mph or higher — have doubled, or even tripled, in some regions.

"It is a very, very substantial increase," lead author Wei Mei from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told the Guardian. "We believe the results are very important for East Asian countries because of the huge populations in these areas. People should be aware of the increase in typhoon intensity because when they make landfall these can cause much more damage."

Currently, the global average sea surface temperature is nearly 1 degree Fahrenheit higher than the 1971-2000 average. Sea water closer to land is warming much faster than water in the open ocean, creating a temperature difference that feeds tropical storms.

"If you have warming coastal water, it means that typhoons can get a little extra jolt just before they make landfall," Kerry Emanuel, a professor of meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who wasn't involved in the study, told the Verge. "And that's obviously not good news."

What this means is that typhoons like Haiyan — a category 5 storm that crashed through the central islands of the Philippines in 2013 and killed over 6,300 people — are likely to become more common in the coming years.

"The projected ocean surface warming pattern under increasing greenhouse gas forcing suggests that typhoons striking eastern mainland China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan will intensify further. Given disproportionate damages by intense typhoons, this represents a heightened threat to people and properties in the region," the authors wrote in the study.

The researchers stopped short of pinning the blame for warming oceans on anthropogenic climate change, and even cautioned that their analysis of typhoons in northwest Pacific does not apply to other regions.

However, earlier studies have shown that climate change-induced warming is, in fact, making the world stormier. A 2012 paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzed data dating back to 1923 and found that even in the Atlantic Ocean, large hurricanes were becoming more common. In 2013, a study led by MIT's Emanuel found that if global emissions of greenhouse gases continue along their current trajectory, storms in North Pacific and North Atlantic are likely to become both — stronger and more frequent.

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #55 on: September 14, 2016, 04:27:08 PM »
Strongest storm on the planet makes landfall ... video on page:  Super Typhoon Meranti wreaks havoc 01:12
...

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/09/14/asia/typhoon-meranti-weather/index.html

Typhoon batters Taiwan, barrels into mainland China

By James Griffiths, Joe Sterling, and Brandon Miller, CNN
Updated 2005 GMT (0405 HKT) September 14, 2016

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #56 on: October 06, 2016, 11:49:53 AM »
9 hours ago

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-37570852

Typhoon Chaba batters South Korea and heads to Japan

At least six people have been killed after Typhoon Chaba battered South Korea, authorities said.
The southern cities of Busan and Ulsan were worst affected, as well as the resort island of Jeju.
Transport, schools, factories and the country's main port ground to a halt. Footage showed muddy floodwaters rushing through city streets.
The storm is now hitting Japan, where the meteorological agency issued warnings and flights were cancelled.
The death toll included a fire fighter in Ulsan who was helping with rescue efforts, local media reported. Four people have been reported missing.

MadMax

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Re: Extreme weather Asia
« Reply #57 on: March 29, 2017, 03:29:53 PM »
INCREDIBLE weather updates for you! Cyclone Debbie nearly the size of France! We are also on earthquake watch as the sun is freaking out above us as well as Nibiru waves heading towards Earth. WTH?

http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2017/03/a-whopping-30000-are-evacuated-everyone-will-be-in-shock-after-the-full-impact-is-known-extremely-extreme-weather-updates-quake-watch-videos-3494675.html

Cyclone Debbie: “Everyone will be in Shock” after the full impact is known

A powerful cyclone has pummelled the north-east Australian coast, causing major damage, torrential rain and power cuts to tens of thousands of homes.

Cyclone Debbie made landfall between Bowen and Airlie Beach in Queensland as a category four storm, whipping gusts of up to 263km/h (163mph). It is moving inland as a category two storm but could cause damage for hours yet.

The extent of Cyclone Debbie’s devastation, which has a 50km-diameter eye wall, may not be known for some time, the authorities said.


Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said assessing damage was difficult because communities had been cut off from power and phone reception. “Everyone is going to be in shock tomorrow, just to see the full impact of this cyclone,” she said. “I’m bracing myself for it.”

Cyclone Debbie makes landfall in Queensland

A destructive storm carrying heavy rain and winds of more then 260 km/h has made land fall on Australia’s north east coast.

Cyclone Debbie has been upgraded to a category four – that is just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level, but forecasters say it could rise to level five as it moves inland.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

 

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