Author Topic: Alternative sources of animal feed and animal care in event of earth changes  (Read 1767 times)

Yowbarb

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This Topic is about alternative creative ways to care for and feed domestic/even some wild animals in
the event of earth changes events, cataclysms and in "The Aftertime."
When I say "Aftertime," it is a phrase I have seen referring to the times afte Planet X has passed,
and/or after whatever major event happens with this planet.
Please post your ideas here, and let's keep it positive, please.
- Yowbarb

Survival101

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I've used this source and thought I would share it with you. It has lots of good information on different feedstocks and their nutritional value.  Click on the link ~ http://www.feedipedia.org/

Most often it's best to offer a variety of feeds & forages, thereby assuring a balanced diet. You also want to consider how the feed/food matches to your animal/fowl. Example, you could feed your cattle turnips, mangels and pumpkins and they'd do well, if you were raising them for slaughter. But, if you were milking them you wouldn't want to feed them turnips, unless you were not concerned about how the milk tasted. Goats are ruminants, so they perfer to 'browse' taking little nibbles of everything, as they are a 'brush animal' so, you won't want to feed them a lot of grains. Chickens will need more grain/insects, so you will want to limit the greens. All of them seem to perform better on fermented feeds, the pre-digestion give them more nutrition, with less feed, prevents health problems and strengthens their immune system, etc. Just like it does for us, when we eat Kefir, Yogurt and Sauerkraut. Silage, which is another fermented food form, would be useful to make up for winter feeds in addition to dry forage materials like hay or grasses.

Yowbarb

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I've used this source and thought I would share it with you. It has lots of good information on different feedstocks and their nutritional value.  Click on the link ~ http://www.feedipedia.org/

Most often it's best to offer a variety of feeds & forages, thereby assuring a balanced diet. You also want to consider how the feed/food matches to your animal/fowl. Example, you could feed your cattle turnips, mangels and pumpkins and they'd do well, if you were raising them for slaughter. But, if you were milking them you wouldn't want to feed them turnips, unless you were not concerned about how the milk tasted. Goats are ruminants, so they perfer to 'browse' taking little nibbles of everything, as they are a 'brush animal' so, you won't want to feed them a lot of grains. Chickens will need more grain/insects, so you will want to limit the greens. All of them seem to perform better on fermented feeds, the pre-digestion give them more nutrition, with less feed, prevents health problems and strengthens their immune system, etc. Just like it does for us, when we eat Kefir, Yogurt and Sauerkraut. Silage, which is another fermented food form, would be useful to make up for winter feeds in addition to dry forage materials like hay or grasses.

Survival101, thanks for posting the Feedipedia link and your ideas,  :)
Yowbarb

R.R. Book

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Surival101,

What a fantastic resource, to have all that information in one place!  Was especially struck by the entry on grapevine leaves and stems, which we have growing wild in abundance in our woods.  Never thought of it as forage before!

Will try to sift through the database for a specific northern temperate permaculture list.

Hope you're still around, as it is now a few years since your post!

Socrates

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mangrove/salicornia
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2017, 01:08:49 PM »
Seawater farming is about creating a cycle of shrimp, fish, salicornia and mangrove [4 separate steps] to grow food based on seawater.

Carl Hodges has been experimenting with this, staring with a 3-year trial in Eritrea and now continuing and expanding in Mexico.
He had fed goats and camels the salicornia and mangrove leaves, though salicornia is a fine food for humans [and can be had in supermarkets here, though it's not cheap].

The great thing about seawater farming, obviously, is that it does not require soil to produce results. All one really needs are salicornia and (red) mangrove (seedlings).
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

Yowbarb

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Socrates, thanks for sharing your knowledge here!
:)

ilinda

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Re: mangrove/salicornia
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2017, 05:34:13 PM »
Seawater farming is about creating a cycle of shrimp, fish, salicornia and mangrove [4 separate steps] to grow food based on seawater.

Carl Hodges has been experimenting with this, staring with a 3-year trial in Eritrea and now continuing and expanding in Mexico.
He had fed goats and camels the salicornia and mangrove leaves, though salicornia is a fine food for humans [and can be had in supermarkets here, though it's not cheap].

The great thing about seawater farming, obviously, is that it does not require soil to produce results. All one really needs are salicornia and (red) mangrove (seedlings).
Fascinating to be able to create the various cycles of shrimp, fish, etc., plus you'd most likely be getting some iodine out of all that seawater medium.  Thanks for this, Socrates.