Author Topic: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!  (Read 2116 times)

Willsorr75

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Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« on: September 19, 2013, 08:32:58 AM »
MyFC PowerTrekk Fuel Cell Charger

This innovative new hybrid battery pack has a twist: its disposable fuel cells can be charged with water. Pour a little water into a “power puck” ($4 apiece; 1 oz.) and you’ll generate enough energy for a single smartphone charge. The PowerTrekk also has a lithium-ion battery pack that can be charged via USB cable, so you’re not wedded to the fuel cell system—at least for your first charge. At over $200, this device isn’t cheap, but does have a few advantages: it’s only 8 ounces and can power your phone or GPS off-grid faster than a typical solar charger; and it’s durable enough to bounce around in your pack and withstand splashes. IPhone adapter included.

$229 at REI



BioLite CampStove

What’s cooler than a super-efficient camp stove that weighs only two pounds and requires only twigs for fuel? How about one that charges your iPhone. The heat generated by the BioLite fuels a thermoelectric generator that powers USB-chargeable devices: smartphones, headlamps, GPS devices and more. Twenty minutes of fire will not only boil water for your morning coffee and cook your breakfast, it’ll give you 60 minutes of talk time on your iPhone or Android smartphone.
$129.95 at BioLiteStove.com



FlameStower

BioLite isn’t the only way to harness the power of your campfire for the benefit of your electronic gear. Debuting at this summer’s Outdoor Retailer product show, the FlameStower also uses a thermoelectric generator. You fill up the water reservoir and position the generator over an open flame or other heat source. Its USB output charges at about half the rate of a wall outlet, say the manufacturers, so you can completely charge an iPhone in about 3 hours, depending on the heat of the flame. Good for any USB-chargeable device, it’s only 8 ounces and collapses down to a very stowable 7.75” x 2.25” x 1”-package (inset). Available for pre-order.

$69.99 at FlameStower.com



The PowerPot

The third fire-powered charger on this list uses similar technology in a slightly different way. Whereas the BioLite is the stove itself and the FlameStower uses heat from another source, the PowerPot places the generator on the bottom of a pot you can use to boil up to 46 ounces of water. A flame-resistant USB cable will recharge your smartphone, digital camera or other device at slightly faster rate the other chargers—under 2 hours, the manufacturers claim. Like the FlameStower, you need to keep an eye on the water level, and, at 18 ounces with lid and cable, it’s a tad heavier than average camping pot. (Hint: the lid can be flipped upside down for use as a frying pan.)
$149.00 at ThePowerPot.com


Stay informed, information is our first line of defense!
-Will

Yowbarb

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Re: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2017, 01:15:22 AM »
Willsorr75 I see no one replied to your post, so long ago!
Come on back we need your ideas.
Last time you were on here I think you were getting ready to move. I hope you get this msg. :)
Barb Townsend

R.R. Book

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Re: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2017, 02:34:45 PM »
Here's a pedal power generator on Amazon that is compact and complete enough that it can be tucked into a bug-out bag, or used in any survival location, for just under $200:

https://www.amazon.com/Generator-Emergency-Portable-Lightweight-Polycarbonate/dp/B00EZS8VQS/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1475848102&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=windstream+pedal+power+generator

Might want to read the Q & A carefully.  72% of reviews were in the 4 to 5 star range. 

More from the same company here: https://www.k-tor.com/products/

I found this review to be most helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
We transported it around for awhile to see how it lent itself to keeping it easily available, bug out bag or trunk of the ...
ByOff-Grid-Geekson June 21, 2016
Just finished trying out the Power Block, evaluating it for off-grid and emergency use in crisis situations. The first thing out of the box that struck us was the size and weight. We transported it around for awhile to see how it lent itself to keeping it easily available, bug out bag or trunk of the car. It was a lot smaller and lighter than we anticipated, and was easy to keep on hand. It was rather surprising how it collapses down for storage and packing.

We also demonstrated it to our self reliance group, where it got a lot of feedback and interest. With that many folks looking at it, it got a lot of handing around and cranking, but held up fine with no issues. The "why do the pedals have reflectors" question got some laughter. From other reviews we have seen, it gets asked a lot. And yes, we know the answer...

It took a bit of getting used to its unique output. We are experienced with low voltage (12 volt) direct current power production, and with high voltage (120 volt) alternating current production, but 120 volts of direct current is uncommon. The saving grace is that any 120 volt switching power supplies don't care if the power is AC or DC. But anything with a transformer, like typical 'wallwart' supplies will not work. And it is hard to tell by looking if a supply is switching or not. The type of power supply known as a 'brick' that has an input and an output cord (as opposed to one that plugs directly into the wall like a wallwart) is usually a switching supply. And a supply that states it will use anything between 120 volts and 240 volts AC is typically a switching supply. USB chargers worked just fine, and we powered our laptops with no issues.

The Power Block is rated at 20 watts. If you want to charge a 12 volt DC battery, you will need to use a charger that uses the aforementioned switching power supply. K-Tor sells such a charger for $18. The problem is that this charger only outputs 0.8 amps at 13.8 volts, which equates to 11 watts. It would be nice if the battery charger could utilize the full 20 watts of the Power Box.

If future enhancements are ever considered, a direct USB charging port would be great, as would a direct 12 volt battery charger port, negating the need for the charger.

Overall a very nice product to keep you from sitting in the dark with no communications in a grid-down situation.


Including stock photos of pedal generator and the separate $18 12-volt charger:



« Last Edit: June 05, 2017, 02:51:10 PM by R.R. Book »

MadMax

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Re: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2017, 03:20:48 PM »
I use a pair of:

https://www.amazon.com/Renogy-Watts-Volts-Monocrystalline-Starter/dp/B00BFCNFRM/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1496700858&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=Regony+solar+panel


Renogy 100 Watts 12 Volts Monocrystalline Solar Panels, with a couple 45AH Gel cell batteries to charge up portable HAM radio gear, flashlight batteries, cell phones, etc..

Will all the great pics of the Planet-X system posted recently I think that we are going to get needing such VERY soon!

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2017, 04:27:51 PM »
Those look great, Max!  Do you need an inverter?

MadMax

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Re: Ways to charge devices when there is no electricity!
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2017, 02:30:02 AM »
I try and just run everything I have off of 12 VDC (all Ham radio gear is setup for that), etc..

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)