Author Topic: Auroras in the southern hemisphere  (Read 1730 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« on: October 03, 2013, 10:57:14 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=87301

Southern Lights Taken by Minoru Yoneto on October 3, 2013 Queenstown, New Zealand

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2015, 10:02:21 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

SOLAR WIND SPARKS SOUTHERN LIGHTS:
Earth is passing through a high-speed stream of solar wind, and its gentle buffeting is sparking auroras around the poles. Over the weekend in New Zealand, sky watchers saw a rare summer apparition of aurora australis:

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2015, 07:55:22 AM »
As auroras were seen in the northern US,

MEANWHILE IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE: The ongoing solar wind event is sparking auroras around both ends of the Earth. Before daybreak on June 9th, Taichi Nakamura of Dunedin, New Zealand, opened the shutter of his camera for a deep-sky exposure and recorded ... a sea lion. "I met a cute new friend while observing a beautiful display," says Nakamura. "Overhead, widespread red auroras surrounded the Magellanic clouds. The red-rimmed Milky Way was beautiful as well."

Red auroras are not fully understood. They occur some 300 to 500 km above Earth's surface, much higher than ordinary green auroras. Some researchers believe the red lights are linked to low energy electrons from the sun, which move too slowly to penetrate deeply into the atmosphere. When such electrons recombine with oxygen ions in the upper atmosphere, red photons are emitted. At present, space weather forecasters cannot predict when this will occur. They are as unexpected as ... a sea lion in a geomagnetic storm.
http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=113392&PHPSESSID=migan8liqc5691u42ju89qunt0

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2016, 09:22:27 AM »
Image: Aurora Australis
Taken by Taichi Nakamura on February 10, 2016 @ Dunedin New Zealand
...
http://www.spaceweather.com/

Kyirrie

  • Trusted Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 56
  • Karma: +7/-0
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2016, 05:26:02 AM »
Beautiful aurora shots from New Zealand! Thanks for posting Barb. I have noticed something here in New South Wales where I am in Oz but I don't know that it is aurora's I'm seeing. I don't think it is. It's is too consistent. I have noticed that it was a new moon on the 9th by my calendar and not supposed to be a 1st quarter until the 15th Feb. however on the 10th I noticed a sliver of a large moon just before it set below the western horizon after the sun had already set, not sure what time exactly. Now this being the case, it means that there isn't really a reason for what I see next, and have been noticing the last few days actually. I thought it was odd because it was supposed to be a new moon and the sky would be very dark. I live in the bush not near city lights. I have noticed though that the sky in the north and north east over the mountains seems to have a glow that covers a very large area almost the length of the mountain range. It's never looked like that before. Just the sky in general seems to be lighter than normal, maybe not as light as on a full moon but half the brightness, but in the north it's brighter still. It's like this whether cloudy or not. Will keep watching anyway.
Love and Light,
Lynette

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2016, 07:42:59 AM »
Beautiful aurora shots from New Zealand! Thanks for posting Barb. I have noticed something here in New South Wales where I am in Oz but I don't know that it is aurora's I'm seeing. I don't think it is. It's is too consistent. I have noticed that it was a new moon on the 9th by my calendar and not supposed to be a 1st quarter until the 15th Feb. however on the 10th I noticed a sliver of a large moon just before it set below the western horizon after the sun had already set, not sure what time exactly. Now this being the case, it means that there isn't really a reason for what I see next, and have been noticing the last few days actually. I thought it was odd because it was supposed to be a new moon and the sky would be very dark. I live in the bush not near city lights. I have noticed though that the sky in the north and north east over the mountains seems to have a glow that covers a very large area almost the length of the mountain range. It's never looked like that before. Just the sky in general seems to be lighter than normal, maybe not as light as on a full moon but half the brightness, but in the north it's brighter still. It's like this whether cloudy or not. Will keep watching anyway.
Love and Light,
Lynette

kyirrie it's so good to see your post here.
I bet that is so beautiful where you live. Thanks for sharing that observation - that does sound unusual about the moon.
I suppose those lights could be auroras,
keep us posted?
Barb T.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2016, 11:46:01 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=127712

Aurora Australis - From Wellington, New Zealand

Taken by Jonathan Usher on July 25, 2016 @ Seatoun, Wellington, New Zealand

Details:
It is rare to see the Aurora Australis from Wellington, which is on the North Island of New Zealand. However last night I noticed a glow far to the south that twinkled and moved and I managed to capture a nice image of the scene. Wellington can have wonderful dark skies even within the city limits - this was taken from Seatoun.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2016, 11:52:33 PM »
Lynette, let us know if you were able to get a glimpse of this display of Aurora Australis.

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=127712

All The Best,
Barb Townsend

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2016, 10:07:20 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

ANTARCTIC LIGHTS: For the 4th day in a row, Earth is inside a fast-moving stream of solar wind. This has caused almost non-stop auroras over Antarctica. Gabriel Saiquita sends this self-portrait from Argentina's Belgrano II research station at latitude -78° S:

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2016, 02:38:24 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

GEOMAGNETIC STORM: A solar wind stream is buffeting Earth's magnetic field on Sept. 2nd, causing G1- to G2-class geomagnetic storms. Bright auroras have been reported from both ends of the Earth, including this display over Antarctica:

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=128941 Aurora Ausatralis

http://spaceweathergallery.com/full_image.php?image_name=VARUN-DONGRE-2_1472774279.jpg

Varun Dongre took these pictures from the Maitri Indian Research Base, located in Antarctica's Schirmacher oasis. "We kept an eye on the sky tonight and witnessed beautiful dancing auroras," says Dongre. "It was very bright and moving rapidly. The whole sky turned green and violet--just wonderful!"

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2016, 03:45:21 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

SOLAR WIND STORM SPARKS AURORAS: As predicted, a stream of high-speed solar wind hit Earth's magnetic field on Oct. 25th, sparking geomagnetic storms around both poles. There was one episode of strong storming, which registered G3 on NOAA scales of geomagnetic activity, and many hours of lesser disturbances.

While much attention was given to an explosion of green over the Arctic Circle, the Antarctic was equally bright and colorful.  Taichi Nakamura photographed the glow all the way from Dunedin, New Zealand.

"Through the pockets of clearance, magical lights poured onto the ocean from the sky," says Nakamura. "The aurora was wide and bright with rows of beams appearing time to time."

More auroras are in the offing. This solar wind stream is broad and fast; it is currently blowing 700+ km/s and is expected to influence our planet for some days to come.  High-latitude sky watchers should remain alert for auroras on Oct. 26-27.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2016, 05:10:49 PM »
Aurora Australis -

http://spaceweather.com/

GEOMAGNETIC STORMS ON OCT. 26-27: A high-speed stream of solar wind is swirling around Earth. Will it spark bright auroras for the second night in a row?

Earlier today, Oct. 26th, Ian Griffin photographed a colorful display from Hoopers Inlet in Otago, New Zealand.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 05:48:19 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29833
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Auroras in the southern hemisphere
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2017, 01:12:00 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/  April 22, 2017

SURPRISE! EARTH DAY AURORA STORM:
Last night, Northern Lights descended into the United States as far south as Michigan, Minnesota, and Washington, kicking off an unexpected display of bright auroras for Earth Day. Both ends of our planet started to glow as the magnetic storms intensified. Cindy Ballantyne sends this picture from the Otago Peninsula in New Zealand.
Photo:  Aurora Australis Taken by Cindy Ballantyne on April 22, 2017 @ Otago Peninsula
http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=135011

What happened? A bright CME that left the sun on April 19th was supposed to miss Earth. Instead, it hit, delivering a glancing blow that surprised forecasters.

The show's not over. G1 and G2-class geomagnetic storms are underway on April 22nd as Earth moves through the CME's magnetized wake.  High-latitude sky watchers should remain alert for midnight auroras on April 22-23

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Premier Limited Edition
Offer Ends July 31, 2016

This uplifting and entertaining guide is written to give you, the reader, confidence and hope through effective leadership techniques and survival community strategies designed for an extended tribulation. Learn more...

Survival Seed Vault

Advertise

Marshall's Motto

Destiny comes to those who listen, and fate finds the rest.

So learn what you can learn, do what you can do, and never give up hope!