Author Topic: Videos - Survival Structures  (Read 3583 times)

ilinda

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2016, 04:34:41 PM »
Bamboo?
Not sure if the bamboo would hold up but I have read about bamboo concrete domes...
Jim has warned us before on the downsides of steel rebar--not only lightening strikes, but heavy-duty EMF can cause them to explode, IIRC.  So, am pondering basaltic rebar.  It is lighter in weight, and stronger than steel, plus more flexible, and won't rust.  There are several sites that sell it, but they seem to offer variations in composition.   

Wondering what the downsides are of basaltic rebar, besides cost?

Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2016, 10:02:03 PM »
Bamboo?
Not sure if the bamboo would hold up but I have read about bamboo concrete domes...
Jim has warned us before on the downsides of steel rebar--not only lightening strikes, but heavy-duty EMF can cause them to explode, IIRC.  So, am pondering basaltic rebar.  It is lighter in weight, and stronger than steel, plus more flexible, and won't rust.  There are several sites that sell it, but they seem to offer variations in composition.   

Wondering what the downsides are of basaltic rebar, besides cost?

ilinda, I agree types of rebar other than metal a good idea.  Reinforcement of bamboo, basalt, glass fiber resin reinforced, all used in concrete. Which is best - this idea definitely worth some more discussion.

Here is a PDF about Basalt FRP rebar:

http://www.fdot.gov/materials/structural/meetings/crrb/5_bfrebar.pdf

Yrs. ago I had posted about the GFR concrete. DOMES INT - GFR REINFORCED 225 MPH RESISTANT

A couple links - http://www.monolithic.org/ecoshells gfr

Research and Development on Bamboo Reinforced Concrete Structure:
 
http://www.iitk.ac.in/nicee/wcee/article/WCEE2012_2020.pdf

Socrates

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #32 on: December 06, 2016, 10:00:38 AM »
Quote
I can't think of anything superior to a reinforced concrete dome.

But reinforced with non-conductive material.  If lightning strikes rebar (iron rods), the heat will make the metal expand and crack the concrete.
A few months back i purchased the book below and yesterday and today i was knitting at work while we waited for the newspapers to arrive [i have a paper route]. I'd made a little more than one inch of rope knit and noticed how strong yet flexible this construct is. Then it hit me:What if i scaled this up and used it as a kind of rebar?!

So i'm using thin rope but what if one used something like this?:


Such a thick knitted net might make for excellent rebar to pour your concrete over. Hell, even if the concrete gets bashed, the rope itself could take quite a beating, especially because it gives way and then bounces back if struck by something.
It has also got me interested since i've been wondering for a while how the hell i would ever manage to get rebar to some site i'm interested in pouring concrete, but of course bringing in some rope would not be a problem at all. I'd thought of sourcing oak beam or something but that, too, would entail some really serious hauling of very heavy material and that kind of effort gets to be prohibitively complicated when you're talking about remote locations.
Perhaps with a knitted rope net one might reinforce a lighter wooden or bamboo fence and pour the concrete over that (making sure rope, beams and concrete are thoroughly attached to the bedrock so the structure can't bounce around).


A little interesting history on knitting i came across while looking into this:
[...] knitting guilds sprang up, beginning in the 1400s. Exclusivley male, they were established to protect trade secrets, improve the quality of the profession, and drum up business.

If you were a young man in the Middle Ages and you wanted to become a Master Knitter in a knitting guild, you’d need to devote six years of your life to training. Three years would be spent in apprenticeship learning from the masters; another three were spent travelling the world to learn foreign techniques and patterns. The period of the knitting guilds produced some of the most astonishingly beautiful knitted items.

From the 1400s, knitting grew as a trade. It spread into new lands along with European explorers and colonists during the Age of Exploration. Then in 1589, Englishman William Lee invented the knitting machine. While it didn’t demolish the handknitting industry, it foreshadowed more technological changes to come. Namely, the Industrial Revolution. During the Industrial Revolution, knitting machines became more sophisticated and the manufacture of knits shifted from human hands to machines. In a few generations, knitting transformed from a serious trade (remember those knitting guilds?) to a sweet, staid parlour craft for Victorian ladies.

« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 10:37:25 AM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #33 on: December 06, 2016, 08:59:20 PM »

A few months back i purchased the book below and yesterday and today i was knitting at work while we waited for the newspapers to arrive [i have a paper route]. I'd made a little more than one inch of rope knit and noticed how strong yet flexible this construct is. Then it hit me:What if i scaled this up and used it as a kind of rebar?!

So i'm using thin rope but what if one used something like this?:


Such a thick knitted net might make for excellent rebar to pour your concrete over. Hell, even if the concrete gets bashed, the rope itself could take quite a beating, especially because it gives way and then bounces back if struck by something.
It has also got me interested since i've been wondering for a while how the hell i would ever manage to get rebar to some site i'm interested in pouring concrete, but of course bringing in some rope would not be a problem at all. I'd thought of sourcing oak beam or something but that, too, would entail some really serious hauling of very heavy material and that kind of effort gets to be prohibitively complicated when you're talking about remote locations.
Perhaps with a knitted rope net one might reinforce a lighter wooden or bamboo fence and pour the concrete over that (making sure rope, beams and concrete are thoroughly attached to the bedrock so the structure can't bounce around).


Interesting idea, Socrates! I've no idea how that would hold up as rebar but maybe it would!

ilinda

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2016, 04:15:32 PM »
Quote
I can't think of anything superior to a reinforced concrete dome.

But reinforced with non-conductive material.  If lightning strikes rebar (iron rods), the heat will make the metal expand and crack the concrete.
A few months back i purchased the book below and yesterday and today i was knitting at work while we waited for the newspapers to arrive [i have a paper route]. I'd made a little more than one inch of rope knit and noticed how strong yet flexible this construct is. Then it hit me:What if i scaled this up and used it as a kind of rebar?!

So i'm using thin rope but what if one used something like this?:


Such a thick knitted net might make for excellent rebar to pour your concrete over. Hell, even if the concrete gets bashed, the rope itself could take quite a beating, especially because it gives way and then bounces back if struck by something.
It has also got me interested since i've been wondering for a while how the hell i would ever manage to get rebar to some site i'm interested in pouring concrete, but of course bringing in some rope would not be a problem at all. I'd thought of sourcing oak beam or something but that, too, would entail some really serious hauling of very heavy material and that kind of effort gets to be prohibitively complicated when you're talking about remote locations.
Perhaps with a knitted rope net one might reinforce a lighter wooden or bamboo fence and pour the concrete over that (making sure rope, beams and concrete are thoroughly attached to the bedrock so the structure can't bounce around).

Probably a lot of fibers and fibrous materials could be used successfully, depending on your needs.  I am building a makeshift "greenhouse" I call the Olive House to house two small olive trees during the winter.  The concrete block walls are all up, and I'm partially finished filling the holes from top down to the earth.

Inside each concrete block hole, whether on the front side, 24" high, or the back side, about 50" high, I drive a cedar post (pre-sharpened) into the ground at least a foot.  Then on one end of the building, I poured concrete to surround and fill in around the posts.  On the rest of the holes, I have been mixing cob (clay, sand and straw) and filling those holes (around the cedar post) with the cob.  On top of each wall is a sill plate.

The point is that in most of these concrete block holes is the fibrous straw, and in all of them the cedar post rebar, which encased and covered will outlast me no doubt.  With the posts, there is no need for a "real" foundation that would be needed for a house or anything more substantial.

I'll post a pic or two soon.

Socrates

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2016, 10:35:51 PM »
I think the beauty of using, say, hemp rope as rebar or support of rebar, is that it is not only known to be very tough and strong, but it can also be easily hauled to any location as well as fit into any nook or cranny as anchor.

Whatever is coming, sooner or later, will likely include not only debris storms (caused by mega-gales) but also mega-earthquakes. During earthquakes buildings get tossed up like they weigh nothing if not properly anchored, then they are destroyed as they crash back down.
If you pour concrete onto the ground, it will just get flipped up into the air. To avoid this, 2 things are required:
- proper anchoring
- into bedrock

Rebar [whatever you have, whatever you're using] needs to be placed into holes, nooks or crannies in bedrock so that it is firmly wedged into place. Then, after the concrete has been poured over it, both the rebar and concrete are then cemented to the bedrock and will not budge.
At the base of a valley one might find bedrock since whatever water is running through there has washed away everything besides bedrock. At other locations one may have to dig, perhaps quite a ways, but it should be understood that even 100 meters of earth above bedrock is prone to getting washed, blown or smashed away by what is to come.
Hell, in the end even bedrock isn't untouchable, just look at the Grand Canyon. However, it's a whole lot safer and more reliable than any kind of earth, no matter how compacted or longstanding.

It's all about how one defines "survival structure"; are you looking to survive an annual cycle like winter or a 13,000-year cycle of utter devastation?
I think the hemp rope idea can help with the latter because it brings versatility into the options while still being a material that is known to be very strong and resilient.

TRC: textile reinforced concrete
« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 10:51:57 PM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #36 on: December 08, 2016, 12:02:59 AM »
ilinda, Socrates thanks for sharing your projects and ideas!
I can see, if there was earth movement, the flexibility of the hemp also the fibrous materials might be good.
Question, Socrates, when you say put the rebar (wood, etc.) set into holes in rock, do you mean to actually drill into the rock?
I saw some pneumatic drills from about $1,000-2,000 and of course the small or big drillers could be rented...
I posted some ideas in dome topic awhile ago, about setting posts down into stone around the dome and set it onto rock... Or maybe just the posts around it, to help hold it into place, set into concrete, and the dome on earth, which might be better for some kind of drainage systems...

Socrates

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Organic rebar
« Reply #37 on: December 08, 2016, 02:32:18 AM »
when you say put the rebar (wood, etc.) set into holes in rock, do you mean to actually drill into the rock?
Indeed, though not necessarily. It all depends on the rock one encounters. If you find a nice natural crack or hole, then why drill? But if you don't, the simplest thing is to get your battery-charged drill, set it to hammer setting, put in a nice thick-diameter drill bit and cut into the rock for a few inches. You put one end of your rope in said hole and after you fill it all up with concrete, it is set in stone, so to speak.

I've seen nice gullies cut out by water that could easily be roofed in such a manner. Then, when water rushes through there again [like during spring thaws], it would not only just flow over your construct but this is potentially a way to create something that is invisible to others. Of course the great thing is that river beds and the like are bedrock that's already on the surface; shame to waste it as a resource.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2016, 09:03:28 AM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2016, 03:47:46 PM »
One thing that Marshall mentioned, in one of his videos and/or a book or two, is the issue of "melting rocks" such as bedrock.  It was in the context of that time period during flyby, where if the Earth is "locked" to another body exerting strong Earth-directed forces, due to its size and proximity, that rocks/bedrock could actually liquify from the heat produced from the continual vibratory actions.

And in looking for safe places, Marshall, IIRC, suggests areas with deep topsoil.

My 2 cents says be aware of this idea about bedrock.   Having said that, I admit that our "lean-to" is directly on bedrock, and that in an altered state (non-drug induced) I saw flames emanating from the ground under our lean-to.  Maybe it's toast.

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Re: Bedrock
« Reply #39 on: December 11, 2016, 11:40:04 PM »
Common sense and research [many scientific disciplines independent of each other] suggest the Earth is buffeted regularly, probably every 13,000 years or so. That means that areas that have been stable and safe for millions of years are a safe bet and that young [geologically speaking] rock formations are a (much higher) risk.
There are mountains and caves that have clearly stood the test of time and these are the places one should be looking toward, formations that are millions of years old.

I consider all soil a risk; megagales and megaquakes will be bad, for if they were not, mankind would have survived the last time around (and the times before that). God knows mankind did not pop into existence a few thousand years ago...
If the Earth is physically jolted, the atmosphere will likely create global megagales that leave not a single tree standing, carrying them and rocks with them to lay waste and carry away everything that isn't bedrock.

I also point to Paul LaViolette and his book Earth Under Fire; in this book he argues that coal deposits are not due to some hypothetical buildup of organic matter at some locales, but rather that great floods in previous ages swept away great swaths of organic matter, heaping them up in certain places where they then started to decompose (thereby creating great coal deposits). After all, if there are forces that uproot trees and possibly carry away great quantities of soil, they do end up somewhere (at least if they're not carried out to sea and end up on the ocean floors). But my point is that a megagale is also a debris storm that easily sweeps away all before it. Even in geologically safe zones where one can see that the bedrock is millions of years old i would not bet my life on the soil there going back more than a few thousand years.

I say it's a matter of common sense and imagination; can you imagine something so bad that all underground facilities and major constructs [dams etc.] are also destroyed and leave only a few survivors with the shirts on their back being all they have left? I say that's what you have to be able to imagine since it's apparently what happened to our ancestors.
And having been able to imagine such a magnitude of destruction, do you believe your location will also come through that intact?
I believe these are the uncomfortable questions we all need to ask ourselves, especially in relation to location [location, location...].
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Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #40 on: December 12, 2016, 02:51:17 AM »
One thing that Marshall mentioned, in one of his videos and/or a book or two, is the issue of "melting rocks" such as bedrock.  It was in the context of that time period during flyby, where if the Earth is "locked" to another body exerting strong Earth-directed forces, due to its size and proximity, that rocks/bedrock could actually liquify from the heat produced from the continual vibratory actions.

And in looking for safe places, Marshall, IIRC, suggests areas with deep topsoil.

My 2 cents says be aware of this idea about bedrock.   Having said that, I admit that our "lean-to" is directly on bedrock, and that in an altered state (non-drug induced) I saw flames emanating from the ground under our lean-to.  Maybe it's toast.

ilinda, thanks for your thoughts on bedrock. I had always thought that would be a safe surface but I respect the idea that maybe that is not correct.
Thanks sharing the visions and particularly the concept about settling in areas with deep topsoil. Where might those be? This needs some investigation.
- Yowbarb

Socrates

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Re: Topsoil
« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2016, 08:31:15 AM »
Talking about soil a thought did strike me about how to go about securing it.

Not all trees root deep [like Sequoia and many fruit trees that are more shallow and wide rooting] but trees that do root deep do great work in anchoring the soil. Having said that, tall trees would be the first to blow away in a megagale and would the tree break off or would it carry away tons of soil with it when it goes...?

Here are 2 ideas to go about securing soil:
- plant vetiver in a grid pattern; it roots deeply but the wind has no hold on the grassy top
- plant deep-rooting trees but be ready to cut them down to stumps should you see Nibiru in the sky; that way the roots will stay to anchor the soil since the wind will have no great hold on stumps. Not only that, but after TSHTF these stumps might sprout forth new shoots that grow into trees that you'll be very grateful to have.
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ilinda

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2016, 04:42:40 PM »
One thing that Marshall mentioned, in one of his videos and/or a book or two, is the issue of "melting rocks" such as bedrock.  It was in the context of that time period during flyby, where if the Earth is "locked" to another body exerting strong Earth-directed forces, due to its size and proximity, that rocks/bedrock could actually liquify from the heat produced from the continual vibratory actions.

And in looking for safe places, Marshall, IIRC, suggests areas with deep topsoil.

My 2 cents says be aware of this idea about bedrock.   Having said that, I admit that our "lean-to" is directly on bedrock, and that in an altered state (non-drug induced) I saw flames emanating from the ground under our lean-to.  Maybe it's toast.

ilinda, thanks for your thoughts on bedrock. I had always thought that would be a safe surface but I respect the idea that maybe that is not correct.
Thanks sharing the visions and particularly the concept about settling in areas with deep topsoil. Where might those be? This needs some investigation.
- Yowbarb
Am no expert here, but the combination of deep topsoil plus high elevation, plus lack of underlying fault lines, and elevation above whatever rivers or creeks flow nearby would be good starters. 

I imagine SOME bedrock might be safe in times of extreme lithospheric stressing, but the question of which areas?  One 1993 map comes to mind that we got from our Missouri Depart of Geology and Land Survey, a map that has since been revised, shows the potential for damages from earthquakes.

The areas showing potential for subsidence are one color coding, for collapse--another color, and there are two more colors, one for liquefaction potential, and the other for severe liquefaction potential.  These last two are primarily in Missouri's "bootheel" which is, I believe, deep topsoil, but is also underlain by sand, as it is in the floodplain of the Mississippi River, and in really high water times, many acres are inundated.  Each state presumably would have maps of this nature and it may be wise to investigate potential land purchase with a little help from maps of this nature.

And we need to remember that Mexico City earth quake (? 1980 ?) which was only a 6.0, but killed many people, because apparently Mexico City sits on sand, and I do recall reading the newspaper articles about the liquefaction of the sandy soil underlying Mexico City, and that being one reason for such damages from only a 6.0 quake.

So much to ponder!

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Re: Quakes, fault lines and Planet X
« Reply #43 on: December 14, 2016, 07:34:53 PM »
I think megaquakes have to do with some large celestial body working on the Earth and not necessarily with fault lines. Sure things will be worse if you're on a fault line but is Puma Punku on a fault line? Those massive tight fitting blocks still got knocked off each other.
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