Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 8568 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...: disease resistant and fertile potato
« Reply #45 on: May 31, 2017, 12:30:46 PM »
Quote
Somehow I think we might use the potato seed that seems to grow on some varieties of potatoes, but rarely on others.

After Ilinda's post on potato propagation by actual seeds, I went back and had a closer look at the "Daughter of the Soil" article posted a while back, and found that one cultivar stood out for being both fertile (capable of producing seeds) and disease-resistant: Desiree.  It also crops heavily.  Although most potato seed still available on the market at this late date seem to be susceptible cultivars, Desiree is still available for purchase at Potatogarden.com (Roninger's), Irish Eyes Garden Seeds, The Natural Gardening Company, and Orchard Depot. 

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #46 on: May 31, 2017, 02:15:53 PM »
Thanks Ilinda, you are a wealth of gardening information!  Now we'll all be watching for the little tomato thingies on our potatoes :)  I seem to remember seeing something akin to that on my (female?) asparagus tops, but that's a whole 'nother family.

Potato seed availability update: I just bought a pound of what little "Butte" is still available on Etsy here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/265718007/1-lb-butte-seed-potatoes?&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_b-craft_supplies_and_tools-floral_and_garden_supplies-greenery_and_gardening-plants-fruits_and_vegetables&utm_custom1 

There are still 5 pounds remaining, and from what I've seen, it will be gone after that.  It needs a longer growing season, so should probably go to a Southerner unless folks (like me) are only hoping for small seed potatoes potentially viable for 2018.  I did find two more cultivars available on the market still that are supposed to have very good disease resistance: Elba (also needs a long growing season, so good for the South) and Yukon Gem, an improved  daughter of the old Yukon Gold.  Yukon Gem only needs a medium-length growing season and is available in the Northeast at Wood Prairie Farm, and at Seeds of Change in the Southwest, both companies that seem to be highly conscientious.  Both Elba and Island Sunshine, a long-season disease resistant cultivar mentioned earlier, are also available at WPF, and I noticed that for some reason they seem to be under-emphasizing Elba's reported disease resistance noted in trials - maybe because it's still fairly new.

Including a photo of the Rat's Tail Radish that Ilinda mentioned:
Wow, that pic shows rather long Rat's Tail Radish pods, longer than 3" and certainly interesting looking.  I know people who grow okra so they can pickle the pods.  The radish looks much easier, and no doubt faster, and when pickled, maybe there's not a whole lot of difference to the casual eater.

Yes, I, too, see the female, red berries on some asparagus plants and not on others, and it's my understanding that those are the fruit/berries of the female.  The good thing is they seem to open up and spread a bit, presumably by birds, and you will end up with several more asparagus plants, which you will find hither and thither in the garden.  So do not despair--just transplant them into your asparagus bed where there are missing patches or add on to your bed.


R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #47 on: May 31, 2017, 02:58:53 PM »
Both of those things are great to know Ilinda!  Will especially look into rattail pickling...

Adding that Makah Ozette fingerling potato, a North American landrace on the Slow Food Ark of Taste conservation list, seems to be sold out everywhere but here: https://www.amazon.com/DIRECT-ORGANIC-POTATOES-Ozette-Fingerling/dp/B01M4P2XEP

It has high resistance to late blight, and is a good keeper.

R.R. Book

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Thanks mostly to British breeding experiments, it is possible to get on Ebay and purchase, very inexpensively, several different types of sprouting broccoli seeds for a year 'round harvest, and for hedging our bets against starvation. Sprouting broccolis do not refer to what we think of when we say alfalfa sprouts - rather they are fully grown plants from seed that tend toward perennializing if shoots are constantly harvested at the appropriate time and not allowed to go to seed.  Northerners appear to get much more mileage from these plants than Southerners.

Some of you may remember the Nine Star Perennial Broccoli that mostly disappeared from the market, unless you live in the UK. 

Here are the current varieties and the approximate harvest schedule, which probably varies according to planting time and climate:
Rudolph: December - February
White Eye: February - March
Red Arrow: February - April
Early Purple: February - April
Early Cardinal: March - April
Purple: March - April
White Star (aka Late White): April - May
Late Purple: April - May
Summer Purple: June - October

If anyone knows of other types of sprouting broccoli (non-calabrese) seed still available, please share with us!
« Last Edit: June 02, 2017, 02:16:11 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #49 on: June 02, 2017, 05:17:31 PM »
Both of those things are great to know Ilinda!  Will especially look into rattail pickling...

Adding that Makah Ozette fingerling potato, a North American landrace on the Slow Food Ark of Taste conservation list, seems to be sold out everywhere but here: https://www.amazon.com/DIRECT-ORGANIC-POTATOES-Ozette-Fingerling/dp/B01M4P2XEP

It has high resistance to late blight, and is a good keeper.
Yesterday I tasted a radish seed pod and then later a collard seed pod.  Vey interesting and I'm certain these can be eaten, especially when a bit greener, as these are starting to turn color a bit and are at the end of their green stage.  But just think of the protein content--seeds--and they might look really appetizing in a stir-fry or salad, or whatever.  In fact our discussion right here has made me decide to never grow snow peas again, and instead concentrate on the seed pods of the brassicas, as they're much easier to come by, and don't require a trellis, etc., etc.

Also, a few years ago I grew the Ozette potato, but was disappointed in the size of harvest, plus size of potatoes.  Yes, they are a fingerling, which means not huge tubers, but what I really liked about them was in the review I read, it said how they have different genetics from most modern-day potatoes and there is more variation within a harvest.  So I DO think they are still worth experimenting with.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #50 on: June 07, 2017, 06:30:06 AM »
Socrates, Is the 1500 year-old cave bean that you mentioned the same thing as the Anasazi bean?  If so, since Baker Creek Heirlooms is sold out, maybe folks might be able to find it under another name elsewhere?
« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 06:56:28 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #51 on: June 14, 2017, 11:59:26 AM »
Tomorrow will be garlic digging day.  The garlic bed in the pic shows two varieties of garlic, the one in the foreground has obviously matured earlier, as the plants are leaning over, a true sign they are ready to be dug.  Another sign would be the turning yellow of the tips. 

Notice, though, interspersed among the several hundred garlic plants are the volunteer Purple Peruvian Potatoes, growing from the smaller potatoes I inadvertently left when harvesting potatoes last year.  Update will follow to show the Purple Peruvian potatoes that survived the winter.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #52 on: June 14, 2017, 02:27:28 PM »
What a beautiful garlic patch Ilinda!  Do you prefer to braid and hang yours, or use another storage method?

I like your cinder block raised bed - seems like it would be easy to get just the size and shape you want.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 02:44:20 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #53 on: June 15, 2017, 03:23:06 PM »
What a beautiful garlic patch Ilinda!  Do you prefer to braid and hang yours, or use another storage method?

I like your cinder block raised bed - seems like it would be easy to get just the size and shape you want.
Thank you.  After digging, I lay each plant out horizontally for several days, then hang them in bunches of about 10-15, and hang them on a hook near the ceiling.  Also, early on in the drying process, I segregate those "perfect" ones for planting in October, from the rest which are for eating.  I even make big signs such as, "DO NOT EAT--SEED GARLIC", and "GARLIC FOR EATING".  Sometimes I even segregate the seed garlic in a different room or building just to make sure nobody grabs seed garlic for eating, as the seed garlic is the biggest and best.

I like the block bed for some things, but have found that in digging garlic, for example, one must be very careful not to back up, fall over, and kill oneself by after becoming entangled in uneven clumps/clods of soil, piles of vegetation, the shovel, trowel, etc., etc.

But it will help with the peanut crop to be planted in a day or two because after planting peanut seeds, I immediately cover that bed with hardware cloth to prevent crows, other birds, raccoons, and who-knows-what from digging them up.  I've had serious problems with wildlife eating the peanuts, and the block wall is a hindrance, but not cureall.

Do you braid your garlic?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #54 on: June 15, 2017, 03:30:09 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Yes, braid it and hang it up in the pantry.  Will take a cue from you now and use the best ones for replanting, rather than the runts!

Oh the stories I could tell about near accidents in the garden...we'll have to do a thread on natural medicine for tetanus some time!  :-X

Wonderful too that you grow peanuts - we have a familial allergy and have to steer clear.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 05:01:07 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #55 on: June 21, 2017, 01:48:49 PM »
More tidbits on seed potatoes.  I began (finally) planting potatoes today and imagine my surprise when I opened the storage container (old cooler) only to find not only had the potatoes sprouted nicely, but many had already produced potatoes larger than any I've ever seen on seed potatoes.  Apparently they can't wait to get started!

Will carefully plant these red beauties this evening, after having planted Purple Peruvian this morning, although they certainly didn't look like this.


R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #56 on: June 22, 2017, 11:46:49 AM »
Ilinda, what variety are they?  Will they be ready before your first frost, or does it really matter?  We usually get our first frost by mid-October, though maybe just a light 40 degree one, rather than a killing frost (35 degrees F for non-gardeners).  I was pretty late getting potatoes in the ground this year too, and did order some Purple Peruvians since you had spoken so highly of their performance. :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #57 on: June 22, 2017, 01:49:23 PM »
I wish I knew the variety, but if I take a finished sample after harvest, to the friend I bought them from (at eating stage), she will probably remember.  We bought many pounds of potatoes from our farmer/gardener friend and she usually knows the types of potatoes she grows, as some people have preferences.  I really should do this because this is a keeper type potato.  But I don't recall looking for those little "seed balls" (resemble small tomatoes) on them during growing season, and now that is something that interests me.

Our first frost is usually in October, so I figure it's cutting it close, but when frost threatens, I'll either cut off the tops and mulch heavily, or if time permits, just harvest before the frost.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #58 on: June 23, 2017, 06:17:52 PM »
I wish I knew the variety, but if I take a finished sample after harvest, to the friend I bought them from (at eating stage), she will probably remember.  We bought many pounds of potatoes from our farmer/gardener friend and she usually knows the types of potatoes she grows, as some people have preferences.  I really should do this because this is a keeper type potato.  But I don't recall looking for those little "seed balls" (resemble small tomatoes) on them during growing season, and now that is something that interests me.

Our first frost is usually in October, so I figure it's cutting it close, but when frost threatens, I'll either cut off the tops and mulch heavily, or if time permits, just harvest before the frost.
Called our farmer friend about the "red potato" and she said it's Pontiac.  She has grown it, along with Kennebec, for years and says she receives many requests for both varieties.  She said my hubby told her that "red potato" was the best tasting potato he's ever eaten. 

Further, she was surprised when I told her of the size of the potatoes growing while still attached to the original potato, and said she had never seen them get very big at all, until planted.

  My best guess is that when you are very late in planting, and the spuds "know" it's time, they begin the process anyway, whether they have soil around them or not.  Their first nutrition must come from the original potato or so it seems.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #59 on: June 24, 2017, 10:08:43 AM »
From this article, Pontiac sounds like an heirloom dating back to the Great Depression, with good keeping qualities: http://potatoassociation.org/industry/varieties/red-rounds-potato-varieties/red-pontiac-solanum-tuberosum .  Fedco says that Kennebec is a good Northern potato able to grow under harsh conditions, as well as being good keepers that are resistant to late blight and leaf hoppers ( https://www.fedcoseeds.com/moose/?item=7270 ).  Sounds as if you found two more worthwhile cultivars to bring forward, Ilinda!