Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 3303 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2017, 06:37:21 PM »
Uploading diagram of south yard, an integrated fenced area combining critters, compost and crops, with gates to let critters out to forage.  All another former home school project.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2017, 05:14:14 AM »
Uploading final diagram, north yard.  None of our gardens are this neat and tidy in real life!

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2017, 03:12:26 PM »
Updated east yard diagram -

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2017, 08:04:33 AM »
Adding the common weed Henbit Deadnettle (Lamium amplexicaule) to the list of temperate-climate edibles.  Even though it's not perennial, it is a cold-weather annual that self-sows prolifically and is packed with nutrition for both people and poultry.  It is also an important bee nectary plant in the north. 

Here is a disambiguation of henbit, creeping Charlie, and purple dead nettle: http://identifythatplant.com/three-easily-mixed-up-early-spring-plants/

According to Ediblewildfood.com: "Edible parts: Henbit can be consumed fresh or cooked as an edible herb, and it can be used in teas. The stem, flowers, and leaves are edible, and although this is in the mint family, many people say it tastes slightly like raw kale, not like mint. Henbit is very nutritious, high in iron, vitamins and fibre. You can add raw henbit to salads, soups, wraps, or green smoothies. According to Natural Medicinal Herbs (dot net) this plant is anti-rheumatic, diaphoretic, an excitant, febrifuge, a laxative and a stimulant."

PFAF says: "Edible Uses: Young leaves - raw or cooked; added to salads or used as a potherb."

In looking for specific nutritional content, I came across this interesting chart from Mother Earth: http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/wild-foods-zmaz86jazgoe .  As mentioned above, henbit is more closely related to mints with its square stem than to nettles, so a comparable nutritional profile might be 32 calories per 100 grams, 3g protein, .7g fat, 194 mg calcium, 48 mg phosphorus, 3.8 mg iron, 2 mg sodium, 179 mg potassium, 1,296 mg vitamin A, .13 mg thiamine, .16 mg riboflavin, .7 mg niacin, 64 mg vitamin C.  The purple-colored flowers should be rich in the polyphenol flavonoid proanthocyanidin, a strong antioxidant and important contributor to collagen strength that is also under investigation for anti-cancer benefits.

I also came across an explanation of why the word "dead" is in the common names of some "nettles": "Dead" means "non-stinging."  The dead nettles are in the Lamium genus, while the stinging nettles are in the Urtica genus.


« Last Edit: May 15, 2017, 02:41:22 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #34 on: May 16, 2017, 05:10:24 PM »
I had no idea henbit was so useful!  I leave it in the garden every spring as long as possible because honeybees like it, and IIRC bumblebees also.  Anyway, when the flowers are done, then I can remove and plant.

Maybe now we can eat some.  Anyone else tried it yet?

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2017, 06:21:55 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

I'm thinking of making a separate little garden patch for some of it to remain permanently, and will try it in a chef salad this week and report back.

What are IIRC bumblebees?

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2017, 06:30:48 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

I'm thinking of making a separate little garden patch for some of it to remain permanently, and will try it in a chef salad this week and report back.

What are IIRC bumblebees?
Oops.  Sorry to use that.  IIRC = If I Recall Correctly....

I think I'll start a new topic about these abbreviations.  In visiting one forum in particular, a Linux users group, there are so many abbreviations thrown around that it's not easy for a newbie to even figure out what they are talking about sometimes.  In other forum settings, they are rarely used.  I'm guilty of using IOW for in other words and a few more.  That will be a project for this week.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #37 on: May 25, 2017, 08:21:14 AM »
Don't know if anyone here reads Farmer Scrub's blog ( http://farmerscrub.blogspot.com/ ), but he is an admirer of Carol Deppe, and writes extensively about how to intercrop permie plants to make them produce more in less space, including diagrams. 

Regarding sunchokes, he suggests fermenting them before eating to make them more digestible for folks who don't tolerate the inulin starch well.  A nearby elderly farmer here says that sunchokes need to be overwintered in the ground, allowing the gassy starch to turn to sugar, and that they are eaten in late winter / early spring as a more digestible starvation ration.  If any of you who are knowledgeable about fermenting foods have ideas about how to ferment sunchokes for warm season eating, please share!

 

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