Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 5160 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2017, 06:37:21 PM »
Uploading diagram of south yard, an integrated fenced area combining critters, compost and crops, with gates to let critters out to forage.  All another former home school project.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2017, 08:13:39 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2017, 05:14:14 AM »
Uploading diagram of north yard.  None of our gardens are this neat and tidy in real life!
« Last Edit: June 26, 2017, 08:14:23 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2017, 03:12:26 PM »
Updated east yard diagram -
« Last Edit: June 26, 2017, 07:43:12 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2017, 08:04:33 AM »
Adding the common weed Henbit Deadnettle (Lamium amplexicaule) to the list of temperate-climate edibles.  Even though it's not perennial, it is a cold-weather annual that self-sows prolifically and is packed with nutrition for both people and poultry.  It is also an important bee nectary plant in the north. 

Here is a disambiguation of henbit, creeping Charlie, and purple dead nettle: http://identifythatplant.com/three-easily-mixed-up-early-spring-plants/

According to Ediblewildfood.com: "Edible parts: Henbit can be consumed fresh or cooked as an edible herb, and it can be used in teas. The stem, flowers, and leaves are edible, and although this is in the mint family, many people say it tastes slightly like raw kale, not like mint. Henbit is very nutritious, high in iron, vitamins and fibre. You can add raw henbit to salads, soups, wraps, or green smoothies. According to Natural Medicinal Herbs (dot net) this plant is anti-rheumatic, diaphoretic, an excitant, febrifuge, a laxative and a stimulant."

PFAF says: "Edible Uses: Young leaves - raw or cooked; added to salads or used as a potherb."

In looking for specific nutritional content, I came across this interesting chart from Mother Earth: http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/wild-foods-zmaz86jazgoe .  As mentioned above, henbit is more closely related to mints with its square stem than to nettles, so a comparable nutritional profile might be 32 calories per 100 grams, 3g protein, .7g fat, 194 mg calcium, 48 mg phosphorus, 3.8 mg iron, 2 mg sodium, 179 mg potassium, 1,296 mg vitamin A, .13 mg thiamine, .16 mg riboflavin, .7 mg niacin, 64 mg vitamin C.  The purple-colored flowers should be rich in the polyphenol flavonoid proanthocyanidin, a strong antioxidant and important contributor to collagen strength that is also under investigation for anti-cancer benefits.

I also came across an explanation of why the word "dead" is in the common names of some "nettles": "Dead" means "non-stinging."  The dead nettles are in the Lamium genus, while the stinging nettles are in the Urtica genus.


« Last Edit: May 15, 2017, 02:41:22 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #34 on: May 16, 2017, 05:10:24 PM »
I had no idea henbit was so useful!  I leave it in the garden every spring as long as possible because honeybees like it, and IIRC bumblebees also.  Anyway, when the flowers are done, then I can remove and plant.

Maybe now we can eat some.  Anyone else tried it yet?

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2017, 06:21:55 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

I'm thinking of making a separate little garden patch for some of it to remain permanently, and will try it in a chef salad this week and report back.

What are IIRC bumblebees?

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2017, 06:30:48 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

I'm thinking of making a separate little garden patch for some of it to remain permanently, and will try it in a chef salad this week and report back.

What are IIRC bumblebees?
Oops.  Sorry to use that.  IIRC = If I Recall Correctly....

I think I'll start a new topic about these abbreviations.  In visiting one forum in particular, a Linux users group, there are so many abbreviations thrown around that it's not easy for a newbie to even figure out what they are talking about sometimes.  In other forum settings, they are rarely used.  I'm guilty of using IOW for in other words and a few more.  That will be a project for this week.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #37 on: May 25, 2017, 08:21:14 AM »
Don't know if anyone here reads Farmer Scrub's blog ( http://farmerscrub.blogspot.com/ ), but he is an admirer of Carol Deppe, and writes extensively about how to intercrop permie plants to make them produce more in less space, including diagrams. 

Regarding sunchokes, he suggests fermenting them before eating to make them more digestible for folks who don't tolerate the inulin starch well.  A nearby elderly farmer here says that sunchokes need to be overwintered in the ground, allowing the gassy starch to turn to sugar, and that they are eaten in late winter / early spring as a more digestible starvation ration.  If any of you who are knowledgeable about fermenting foods have ideas about how to ferment sunchokes for warm season eating, please share!

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #38 on: May 29, 2017, 05:51:32 PM »
I don't know if any of you loved the Christy series as much as I did.  Long story short, young girl from rich family leaves wealth behind to follow calling as a teacher deep in the mountains.  Finds herself with two contending suitors, of course.  Deep poverty there, but wealth of natural resources.  Favorite episode was at Thanksgiving time [SPOILER ALERT]: Just as the people are on the verge of facing a bleak winter and the prospect of losing their mountain to a developer, a couple of them go exploring and discover, just in the nick of time, a wealth of mature persimmon trees laden with fruit in a clearing deep in the woods that they never knew existed.  They work together to produce jams etc. to sell to city folk for the Christmas season.

If you've never had a persimmon, they are from native American fruiting trees (non-American cultivars also exist) in the Diospyros genus that fill a couple of important niches in the north:

First, they have longevity, and are roughly equivalent in taste and appearance to apricots, which do not have longevity here (they often tend to die in as many years as it took them to come to maturity). 

Second, they bear in the off-season in mid to late autumn, and edible fruit can still be found clinging to the trees in winter.

The trick to getting good fruit from the American varieties is to leave them on the tree (or let them drop on their own) until they are fully ripe and wrinkled - bite into one too soon and you get a mouth full of bitter astringency. :P  When they do get ripe and drop, then you are competing with area wildlife for the luscious windfalls.

Planted a pair of them in early spring.  One broke dormancy and leafed out beautifully, while the other one has yet to break dormancy two months later.  So I covered the tree in sheet plastic and am "sweating" it until the buds open up.  Important to do because the tree will not put on growth until it wakes up.  Recipes to follow :)


« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 05:15:09 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #39 on: May 29, 2017, 06:28:21 PM »
Persimmon bread recipe:
http://honest-food.net/persimmon-nut-bread-recipe/

(and some recipes add 2/3 c bourbon or cognac) ;)

Persimmon pudding recipe:
http://www.food.com/recipe/persimmon-pudding-15963


« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 03:46:35 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #40 on: May 30, 2017, 06:30:14 PM »
Does that ever look tasty!

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #41 on: June 08, 2017, 02:48:28 PM »
Adding photo of annual Seminole pumpkins coming up in a hay bale amongst the perennial blueberries - no space is wasted!  Advantages of the hay bale:

1. Can utilize this space between blueberry bushes without disturbing their shallow roots.
2. Pumpkins and blueberries have differing pH requirements, and need their own soil
3. Curcubits in this area are notorious for diseases (Seminole is an exception), and this way a problem is not being encouraged in situ
4. When done with this annual crop, hay will be broken down to mulch the shallow blueberry roots
5. Instead of having to rotate the crop, I can plant pumpkins in hay in the same spot next year
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 04:07:15 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Besides strawberry crowns, one small fruiting plant possibly to include (at the last minute) in a zip-lock bag to bug-out with is a first-year dwarf blueberry, or dwarf thornless blackberry or raspberry.  They are sold under different names on the market, with one of the best-known names being Brazleberry, after their breeder.  The blueberry and the raspberry have a more dwarved stature than the blackberry.

The dwarf raspberries and blackberries often produce daughter plants that can be found a short distance away from the mother plant.  These are not suckers or clones in need of division - rather they are entire new plants, free of charge.  For this reason, a few small plants could lead to a nice barter business.  The raspberry version bears throughout the summer, while the blackberry should crop once in summer and again in autumn, and no need to bother with pruning old floracanes every year.  Their low profile makes them a good forage food for grazing poultry, so if you want any fruit for yourself, need to be one step ahead of them!

Mature ones growing on septic system:
« Last Edit: June 12, 2017, 11:20:29 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture: Disease-resistant cold-hardy grapes
« Reply #43 on: June 09, 2017, 06:32:05 AM »
Disease-resistant seedless grapes suitable for the North can be divided into two categories: Muscadines (a.k.a. Scuppernogs) and Labruscas, both of which are native to North America, as opposed to the Vitis vinifera grapes imported from Europe to California for wine making.  While the cool moist climate of the Northeast and the warm moist climate of the Southeast make the entire East Coast mostly unsuitable for vinifera with its disease susceptibility, the Muscadines and Labruscas thrive here.  As a broad generality, grapes that are suitable for the East Coast tend toward being "slipskin," meaning that they don't have the delicate thin skins of West Coast wine grapes.

Though Muscadines are mostly grown in the South, the Ison family of Georgia has been breeding them since the Great Depression and has developed some extremely cold-hardy and disease-resistant cultivars capable of thriving in the north.  "Fry Seedless" is a red variety that needs to pollinate with another cultivar, and "Black Fry" is a good choice in the North.  The grapevines are so vigorous that they need to be pruned back several times in summer, and the cuttings make good forage for goats.  See recent photo below after the first pruning of summer.

Disease-resistant Labrusca and hybrid types that I'm currently experimenting with include Mars blue seedless from the University of Arkansas, Black Corinth seedless champagne, and Einset red seedless.  Mars and Einset are the most cold-hardy of these.  They can be obtained for under $10.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2017, 05:51:37 AM by R.R. Book »

Socrates

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Re: blueberry roots
« Reply #44 on: June 09, 2017, 06:41:14 AM »
Can utilize this space between blueberry bushes without disturbing their shallow roots.
:o
I heard... blueberry roots can go down, like, 30 feet...
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