Author Topic: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells  (Read 1402 times)

Yowbarb

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R.R. Book

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2017, 09:34:55 AM »
Thanks for that link Barb! 

The information about sugar feeding cancer reminded me of G. Edward Griffin's book World Without Cancer from a generation ago, with the added twist of emphasizing healthy fats and promoting the Krebs cycle. 

With our prolonged winters and cloud cover up here now,  I'm finding carbs more tempting than I used to.  Am not feeling a desire for meat much any more except for the broth, and am allergic to nuts, so that leaves mostly dairy for protein.  Have been eating non-fat cottage cheese for 5 years, as well as the Triple Zero yogurt with Stevia made more recently by Oikos.  Am not afraid of cholesterol, but the Triple Zero provides a decent-tasting product without all the sugar that's usually added to yogurt.  Am getting dietary fat via home-raised free-range eggs, home-made soups, salad dressings, butter, palm fruit oil, olive oil, occasional pasta sauce, and some crackers to go with the cottage cheese, then taking in other healthy oils via supplements.  Gained weight this past winter that needs to be taken back off! :(
« Last Edit: May 09, 2017, 09:50:55 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2017, 05:16:20 PM »
Thanks for that link Barb! 

The information about sugar feeding cancer reminded me of G. Edward Griffin's book World Without Cancer from a generation ago, with the added twist of emphasizing healthy fats and promoting the Krebs cycle. 

With our prolonged winters and cloud cover up here now,  I'm finding carbs more tempting than I used to.  Am not feeling a desire for meat much any more except for the broth, and am allergic to nuts, so that leaves mostly dairy for protein.  Have been eating non-fat cottage cheese for 5 years, as well as the Triple Zero yogurt with Stevia made more recently by Oikos.  Am not afraid of cholesterol, but the Triple Zero provides a decent-tasting product without all the sugar that's usually added to yogurt.  Am getting dietary fat via home-raised free-range eggs, home-made soups, salad dressings, butter, palm fruit oil, olive oil, occasional pasta sauce, and some crackers to go with the cottage cheese, then taking in other healthy oils via supplements.  Gained weight this past winter that needs to be taken back off! :(
Yes we need to be reminded of the toxicity of sugar, and how it literally feeds cancer.  Need that reminder regularly.

Also,congrats, RRBook, on your interrestingly healthful meals.  Have you ever tried making your own yogurt?  That way there's never any worry about added ingredients such as Aspertame, etc.  Still, it looks as if you're on top of it all.

R.R. Book

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2017, 01:01:03 PM »
I would absolutely love to learn how to make my own yogurt, especially if it could be done without electricity... :)

ilinda

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2017, 06:05:11 PM »
I would absolutely love to learn how to make my own yogurt, especially if it could be done without electricity... :)
It CAN be done w/o electricity.  All you need is to be able to heat a good quantity of water for your water-bath canner or a large cooler, etc.  We've used both and hubby prefers the waterbath canner, but I use and prefer a cooler.  The downside of using the canning pot is that once the water is at the temp. you want, then you will have to wrap the pan well with layers of newspaper, wool blankets, etc.  With a cooler, you have SOME insulation, but still you may want to layer on a few things--after mine is ready to incubate in the cooler, I close the cooler, layer on a wool sweater, cotton towel, down-filled vest, a blanket if handy, and on top of all I place a heavy 100% wool overcoat.  With the canner, hubby has a many-layered swath of newspapers he duct-taped together years ago for this purpose.  He gets it out and carefully wraps the newpaper insulation around the canner, and also often places several layers of newspaper underneath canner.  Then on top he places some of those items I mentioned that I use, assuming we are making yogurt on different days.

If you have solar-heated water, all the better and you can save the time of heating with wood. 

Ok, now you know about heating water.  What temp. do you want?  Here is the critical divide.  If you like to pasteurize your milk, you will need to place your jars of milk in the canner and heat it up to about 145 (on wood stove or outdoor oven) and hold that temp. for about 30 minutes.  I NEVER pasteurize so I get the water at the temp. I want for making yogurt which is now about 95-100 deg. F (years ago I made it at 105-115 deg. F).  When the water is at about 100 deg. F, I place the yogurt starter in the jars of raw milk, one at a time, and place them, as I add starter, into the water in the cooler.  IOW, add starter to milk, stir very well, then place that jar in cooler, making sure the jar lid is loose.  If tight, no yogurt will happen.  Do this with each jar.  Now, if the milk in jars was rather cold, your thermometer that is floating in the water will tell you how quickly or slowly the cold milk will bring down the water temp.  I just check the temp. of the water about every 15-30 minutes, and when it appears the temp. is stable, about 95 degrees, then I cover it for good and let it sit over night.  I have left it to culture for as long as 18 hours with no problems, although it was not my intention to go that long.  I usually get the jars out and refrigerate them after about 12 hours.  There are a few more steps if you want to pasteurize your milk (hubby does--still a resister to the truth of raw milk), and if someone wants to hear about that, I'll post here.

You can heat the water in a stock pot or some kind of pan, or even the water bath canner, especially if you're using a cooler for culture.  I use a cooler that has a spigot at the bottom on one end, so if the temp. has dropped too much because of lots of cold milk to start, it is very easy to drain some off, then add hot water to bring up the level as high as you can.  You want to use as much water as possible, as water is the best heat sink there is, thus will hold heat better than air, wool, etc.  So, if using 1/2 gallon jars, for example as I do, you want that water level up near the bottom of the threads at the top of the jar.  But you don't want it higher as you definitely don't want water up near the very top of the jars where the lid is held on by the ring, as it's likely water can seep in.

Once you have the temp. you want for culture after checking every 15-30 minutes, wrap all well, and forget about it until 12 or so hours later.  Also, I never have a cold breeze coming in to the kitchen or wherever culture is.

Hope this helps and if you have questions, just yell.  We've been making yogurt for decades.

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2017, 11:16:12 PM »
I would absolutely love to learn how to make my own yogurt, especially if it could be done without electricity... :)

R.R. Book thanks for your great posts. Really appreciating all of it.
I will have to find my old posts on this, yogurt making w/out electricity,
but anyway ilinda knows how to do it...and just posted about it.
(You probably already saw her Reply #4 on: Today at 06:05:11 PM.
Great thing to be able to know how to do. :)
ilinda had originally posted about the Truth About Cancer, and sugar...

R.R. Book

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2017, 05:09:52 AM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for the wealth of information on making yogurt the old-fashioned way.  It reminds me of the non-electric method of incubating eggs... :)

Wonderful that you've been doing this for decades! 

Can you explain in further detail about the starter?

Also, would you share more with us about unpasteurized milk?  We get raw milk locally from the Amish, which can't be beat for taste, but I'd like to learn more about other ways it might be good.  My understanding is that it's legal here as long as it's not sold across state lines.  The local news media love to come up with stories about listeria, campylobacter, tuberculosis, brucellosis, etc. ::)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 07:22:16 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2017, 06:04:30 PM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for the wealth of information on making yogurt the old-fashioned way.  It reminds me of the non-electric method of incubating eggs... :)

Wonderful that you've been doing this for decades! 

Can you explain in further detail about the starter?

Also, would you share more with us about unpasteurized milk?  We get raw milk locally from the Amish, which can't be beat for taste, but I'd like to learn more about other ways it might be good.  My understanding is that it's legal here as long as it's not sold across state lines.  The local news media love to come up with stories about listeria, campylobacter, tuberculosis, brucellosis, etc. ::)
Good to know someone is helped by this. 
OK, starter is key.  And it's getting harder and harder to find, i.e., starter that is good live mix of cultures that produce the taste we all expect in yogurt.

For now, hubby always makes non-fat yogurt from pasteurized milk, and he further pasteurizes it a second time in the process of making yogurt.   I always make full-fat yogurt from raw milk and never allow temperatures to go higher than 100 deg. F, and keep it incubating at around 95 deg. F.

Years ago we periodically bought "plain" unsweetened yogurt, a good brand such as Dannon (then), and used that as starter.  But now most yogurts have changed and many have other ingredients such as gelatin, carob bean gum, etc., etc.  So now it is difficult (when we need a new starter due to bad batches, etc.) to find a good and pure brand.  So far, "Nancy's" plain, non-fat yogurt is what he occasionally buys if needed.

For now though, both hubby and I use his own yogurt as starter for our next batch, because his yogurt is just cultured milk with live cultures (after milk cools to 100-105 deg. he adds starter).  Usually we have good luck with his yogurt as starter, for example a large blob, or large serving spoon full is what I put into a half-gallon jar with the milk, then stir.  He does the same with his quart jars of milk, adding starter from his last-week's-yogurt.

We usually can go for years without having to search for new starter, but occasionally we do, when he gets really low on last week's yogurt, and the starter we use fails.  Then we feel totally ruined, and fortunately we have stores for now.  This is something to keep in mind.  Get in the habit of making some non-fat yogurt along with your full fat yogurt, so you'll have a backup jar of starter if needed.

Now about raw milk.  I think in the U.S., each state has its own laws on what is legal or illegal.  Here in MO, you can buy raw milk directly from the farmer, only if you go to the farm, OR, if you are on a regular, scheduled delivery route.  It's pretty narrow.  If you do not show up on delivery day, you forfeit your milk, and nobody else can come and buy it just because you didn't show up.

Yes, the MSM, mainstream media, loves to blather on about how people are dropping like flies after sipping a bit of raw milk.  But as we know it's rubbish.   However we also know one must be extremely cautious when handling raw milk and if you know and trust your dairy farmer, you've probably got a wonderful deal, as we do.  A dairy here in MO was shut down for supposedly having listeria in a batch.  BUT, the MO dept. of Health refused to answer the questions about which species of Listeria.  They refused to do anything but shut the farm down and they lost their shirts.  Problem is there are about 10 or more different species of Listeria, and only one to my knowledge is pathological.  So there is good reason to suspect it was a political shutdown because NOBODY got sick or died!

One of the benefits of raw milk is the enzyme phosphatase which somehow "releases" calcium so that the bone can absorb it.  Pasteurized milk destroys or denatures that enzyme so there is no help there for bone health.  Post menopausal women and also older men need the enzyme in raw milk if they are going to help build bone strength.  Makes one wonder how many other enzymes, etc, are destroyed by the heat of pasteurization.  Maybe Vit. B12.  Maybe lots more.

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2017, 12:32:29 AM »
Yowbarb quick note:
First part of an article by Mercola about butter and mentions sources of raw butter etc.
...
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/12/07/why-is-butter-better.aspx 

For sources of raw butter, visit www.realmilk.com.

Dr. Mercola's Comments:   
The unfortunate result of the low-fat diet craze has been the shunning of healthful fats such as butter, and public health has declined as a result of this folly.

Good-old-fashioned butter, when made from grass-fed cows, is a rich in a substance called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA is not only known to help fight cancer and diabetes, it may even help you to lose weight, which cannot be said for its trans-fat substitutes.

Much of the reason why butter was, and continues to be, vilified is because it contains saturated fat. If you're still in the mindset that saturated fat is harmful for your health, then please read this past article to learn why saturated fat is actually good for you.

In fact, by now many have realized that it's the trans fat found in margarine, vegetable shortening, and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils that is the true villain, causing far more significant health problems than saturated fat ever could.

Get Over it -- Saturated Fat Does Not Cause Heart Disease!
The demonization of saturated fat began in 1953 with Dr. Ancel Keys' publication of a paper comparing fat intake and heart disease mortality. His findings were flawed, but his theories quickly caught on and the misguided belief that saturated fat causes heart disease has continued ever since, despite the evidence to the contrary...

For example, a recent analysis of published studies on saturated fat and heart disease again failed to find any clear link between the two.

The reality is that most people -- about two-thirds of the U.S. population -- can include grass-fed butter in their diets and thrive! Those who may do better with lower fat choices are mainly carb nutritional types.

But there is one caveat.
Ideally, your butter should be raw (unpasteurized), otherwise you'll run into all the health issues associated with all pasteurized dairy.

Want to Get Back to Basics? Try Making Your Own Butter!
As mentioned above, www.realmilk.com can help you locate a source of raw butter. But, if you want to try your hand at making it yourself, you can do that too!

[  Continues: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/12/07/why-is-butter-better.aspx  ] 

R.R. Book

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2017, 05:03:40 AM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for the detailed explanation about yogurt starter.  Am guessing this is also where kefir comes from, which your husbands starter-in-milk sounds like the equivalent of. 

Have been puzzling over how to get viable probiotics in the aftertime, and this may be the best way.  Pills lose their strength over time, and those freeze-dried yogurt solids that are marketed in #10 cans by the storage food companies strike me as probably being devoid of friendly bacteria.  Marshall's warning about gut illness on storage foods makes yogurt seem like way more than a luxury item to have.

Barb, Thanks for the heads up that butter should be grass fed.  As far as raw, did I make a mistake in pressure canning lots of pints of it this past winter?

Would love to be in the kitchen with both of you! :D

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2017, 01:02:21 PM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for the detailed explanation about yogurt starter.  Am guessing this is also where kefir comes from, which your husbands starter-in-milk sounds like the equivalent of. 

Have been puzzling over how to get viable probiotics in the aftertime, and this may be the best way.  Pills lose their strength over time, and those freeze-dried yogurt solids that are marketed in #10 cans by the storage food companies strike me as probably being devoid of friendly bacteria.  Marshall's warning about gut illness on storage foods makes yogurt seem like way more than a luxury item to have.

Barb, Thanks for the heads up that butter should be grass fed.  As far as raw, did I make a mistake in pressure canning lots of pints of it this past winter?

Would love to be in the kitchen with both of you! :D

R.R. Book it is awesome that you canned lots of butter. Butter in any form is surely better than having none. You are doing lots of things right. :)
Pls continue to share your knowledge here...
U 2 ilinda. :)

ilinda

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2017, 05:30:39 PM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for the detailed explanation about yogurt starter.  Am guessing this is also where kefir comes from, which your husbands starter-in-milk sounds like the equivalent of. 

Have been puzzling over how to get viable probiotics in the aftertime, and this may be the best way.  Pills lose their strength over time, and those freeze-dried yogurt solids that are marketed in #10 cans by the storage food companies strike me as probably being devoid of friendly bacteria.  Marshall's warning about gut illness on storage foods makes yogurt seem like way more than a luxury item to have.

Barb, Thanks for the heads up that butter should be grass fed.  As far as raw, did I make a mistake in pressure canning lots of pints of it this past winter?

Would love to be in the kitchen with both of you! :D

R.R. Book it is awesome that you canned lots of butter. Butter in any form is surely better than having none. You are doing lots of things right. :)
Pls continue to share your knowledge here...
U 2 ilinda. :)
Yes, it's reassuring to know you have butter in storage, as most of us don't and won't. 

In pondering how to get probiotics in lean times, one might go to so-called extreme measures as some of the nomadic tribes have known to do.  Isn't it true that they place fresh, raw milk (think yak milk) into a "container" fashioned out of a section of intestinal tissue from an herbivore, and carry that around on the body for a while, at body temperature for good culturing, and in the end they have "yak yogurt" or perhaps "yak kefir"?  It is my understanding of kefir that it is cultured at a temp. considerably lower than that of buttermilk or yogurt.

Also, isn't it true one can just allow fresh raw milk to "sour" naturally on a countertop, and then at the right time, take some of the clabbered milk as starter for buttermilk or yogurt?  Isn't that clabbered milk rich in probiotics and thus would serve as a reservoir of the right bacteria?  Also, isn't it true that one can take a starter, culture it, and the end result will greatly depend on the temperature at which it is held during culture?  Cottage cheese--75 deg. F; buttermilk 90 degF, yogurt 100 deg. F, kefir 70 deg. F? 

IOW, the mix of bacteria is there in the initial blob of starter, and each species or grouping of species has its own preferential growth medium, which dictates the end product.  Hope someone can correct whatever here is incorrect.

R.R. Book

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2017, 06:44:54 PM »
Ilinda, You've raised some really good questions about clabbered milk and yogurt. 

If anyone would like to try pressure canning butter, it's pretty easy.  Pour melted butter into hot jars, wipe rims, place lids and rims on, and process in a few inches of water at 10# pressure 60 minutes for jelly jars, 75 minutes for pints or 90 minutes for quarts.  Once cooled and lids have vacuum sealed, refrigerate over night to help solidify.  Shake every now and then until solid to keep solids from separating back out.

Happy Mother's Day to the ladies!

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2017, 01:20:16 PM »
Ilinda, You've raised some really good questions about clabbered milk and yogurt. 

If anyone would like to try pressure canning butter, it's pretty easy.  Pour melted butter into hot jars, wipe rims, place lids and rims on, and process in a few inches of water at 10# pressure 60 minutes for jelly jars, 75 minutes for pints or 90 minutes for quarts.  Once cooled and lids have vacuum sealed, refrigerate over night to help solidify.  Shake every now and then until solid to keep solids from separating back out.

Happy Mother's Day to the ladies!

R.R. thanks for the great posts and the Mother's Day wishes.  :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2017, 01:29:15 PM »
Here is something which may seem a bit random. Maybe this will help someone.
As someone who would prefer to be vegetarian or mostly, most of the time, I am still juggling this and that in the way of beliefs, concepts and my own health issues.

What I have come up with is I will gradiently start doing do a version of the Ketogenic and the SCD diets.
I am not always so strong on self discipline...

I do not want to go back to eating red meat. I don't even feel that great eating chicken... turkey is better as per the Type O diet...but I do not want a ton of animal protein...

My solution for now, which I wanted to share is, I will start mainly a ketogenic diet and allow fish and seaweed etc. (being careful of sources of fish etc.)
I have already added a lot of fat to my diet such as the butter or ghee and the coconut oil (my bulletproof coffee which I found out about from Socrates.)

It's just my thing, would prefer to eat low on the food chain. NOTE: In a survival situation, hey I will go out with a bow and arrow and catch and cook anything I can get my hands on for my family...If kids are hungry, whether it is a cow, rabbit, buck or possom I will do my best to get it.

I would eat whatever is available...I would prefer to catch and dry fish if that is possible!

So here is a link to a discussion about this stuff... fish for keto and even a vegan or vegetarian keto, info on... Bear in mind I do NOT know if these alternative forms of keto work but I do know there are a lot of people who would prefer to modulate the diet to fit existing lifestyles... I hope it works for them. I hope it works for me. Here is one discussion:
"Keto without red meat?"
https://www.reddit.com/r/keto/comments/3dwvlg/keto_without_red_meat/