Author Topic: Archaeological finds  (Read 3465 times)

Yowbarb

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Archaeological finds
« on: May 27, 2014, 08:47:43 AM »
Yowbarb Note:
suspicious0bservers mentioned "another pre- Nazca discovery" in Chile. After the 8 point quake
April 1st, digging commenced and the 7,000 year old mummy was found.
...

7000yr Old Mummy, Perspectives | S0 News May 27, 2014    6:17  820 views

LINK: http://youtu.be/sBckqf7v8OA

Published on May 27, 2014
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Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2014, 09:35:03 AM »
http://time.com/117239/chilean-students-discover-7000-year-old-chinchorro-mummy/

Science Paleontology

Chilean Students Discover 7,000-Year-Old Mummy

David Stout   2:02 AM ET

workshop dug up an ancient mummy in northern Chile over the weekend

Chilean students participating in an archaeological dig on Saturday near the Peruvian border hit paleontological gold after discovering the remains of a 7,000-year-old Chinchorro mummy.

Officials from the Chilean National Heritage Office were sent to the dig site in Chile’s Morro de Arica to commence a complete investigation into the recovered remains.

A large number of historical artifacts have reportedly been forced to the surface in swaths of the northern parts of the country following a massive 8.2 earthquake that rocked the area in April, according to AFP.

Mummies from the Chinchorro culture are among some of the oldest preserved cadavers to have ever been discovered.

A group of Chinchorro mummies — dated between 5000 B.C. and 3000 B.C. — are on display during the exhibition "Arica, a Thousand-Year-Old Culture," on Aug. 27, 2008, in the cultural center of the La Moneda presidential palace in Santiago, Chile
« Last Edit: June 02, 2014, 12:08:51 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2014, 12:04:21 PM »
This is a brief video from TWC and an image. Matt Sampson of TWC said it was elementary students who found the mummy.
...............................................................................


http://www.weather.com/special/uncharted/video/7000-year-old-mummy-found-by-students-49173?collid=/video-minutes/uncharted

7000 Year Old Mummy Found by Students!

Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2014, 08:28:21 PM »
http://www.weather.com/science/news/million-mummies-unearthed-ancient-cemetery

UNEARTHED: One MILLION Mummies

A Million Mummies Discovered in Egypt

By Michele Berger
Published Dec 19 2014 03:27 PM EST

Preserved in the hot dry desert of Egypt may be one of the largest grave sites ever discovered.
If the thought of mummies makes you recoil, you might consider staying far away from Egypt for awhile. A team of researchers from Brigham Young University recently unearthed a cemetery there a million mummies strong.

“It’s large and it’s dense,” Project Director Kerry Muhlestein, a BYU associate professor, wrote in a paper he presented in November at the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities Scholars Colloquium, according to LiveScience. Most of the mummies aren’t royalty or kings but rather regular people.

BYU researchers have been excavating the area for decades. In addition to the cemetery, they’ve been studying a nearby pyramid — what Muhlestein in 2012 called perhaps the “first true pyramid” — and a Greco-Roman township, and they’ve already discerned quite a bit about the people who lived here some 1,500 years ago.

“We are learning about the diseases and difficulties they endured, the food they consumed, their clothing and playthings as well as their religious beliefs,” Muhlestein wrote. “One of the most interesting elements of the cemetery is that it witnessed their conversion to Christianity.”

There’s much more to learn from the site, Muhlestein told LiveScience. For example, why are there redheads buried together in one spot and people with blonde hair in another? Why is there a 7-foot-tall man? And maybe most importantly, where did all of these mummies come from? One hypothesis is the ancient town of Philadelphia, which isn’t too far. However, the town itself has its own burial sites.

Muhlestein’s team is analyzing the genes, teeth and skulls of the bodies found, then putting of all they learn into a large database. The hope, he wrote, is to get to know the “characteristics of the society…. By doing this, we expect to gain a better understanding of the sacred landscape within our area and those of similar sites in Egypt.”

What the researchers do know is that these weren’t mummies in the typical sense of the word. “The deceased’s internal organs were rarely removed,” LiveScience reported. “Instead, it was the arid natural environment that mummified them.” Time could be running out for the BYU researchers, though not because of the weather. Area farmers are expanding their fields, according to KSL News, coming perilously near to the ancient gravesite.

Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2015, 11:17:44 PM »
"SUPERHENGE"

Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2016, 03:14:11 AM »
http://www.wimp.com/the-lost-city-of-skara-brae/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=story/

Villagers Discovered This Hidden Settlement In 1850. You Won't Believe What It Looks Like Today

By Jake Brannon
On a rainy winter night in 1850, no one knew that Scotland's history would be changed forever. A harsh storm blew in from the Bay of Skaill, leaving over 200 inhabitants dead in its wake. It wreaked havoc on the surrounding area, and many probably questioned why such a horrible disaster would fall upon them. But for as much as the storm took away from the people of Scotland, it gave them back something more valuable than they could have ever dreamed.

Those who managed to survive the dreadful weather emerged from their homes to find that the storm had revealed the outline of a village. That's right, the storm was so powerful that it managed to strip away portions of the earth, unveiling a piece of history so unbelievably intact that many have deemed it "The Scottish Pompeii." Its proper name, however, is "Skara Brae."

After that fateful storm in 1850, the inhabitants of Skaill began excavating the subterranean settlement that had been unearthed. They managed to uncover four complete houses before abandoning the site in 1868. No one touched Skara Brae until 1913 when robbers swooped in and stole a countless number of artifacts. After that, the site went untouched for another 11 years. It was only in 1924, when another storm hit the same spot and destroyed a portion of one of the houses that Scotland decided to conduct a proper investigation of Skara Brae. Check out the images below for a tour of this fascinating ancient settlement.

Looking at the condition of these walls, you'd think they were at most a few hundred years old.

But, believe it or not, the settlement of Skara Brae is over 5,000 years old!

This cluster of eight stone houses is thought to have been constructed during the Neolithic period, with people living in it as early as 3180 BC.
[ Continues ]
http://www.wimp.com/the-lost-city-of-skara-brae/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=story/
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2016, 11:56:42 PM »
Pyramids of China - ROBERT SEPEHR  6:19    1,174 views

video link: https://youtu.be/WQREYTGlfgM

Published on Jun 16, 2016
Measuring over 1,000 miles from southwest to northeast and 500 miles from north to south, the Gobi is a vast desert in Asia, spanning from northern China to southern Mongolia. Following major cataclysms which left the desert in its current condition, the ancient inhabitants said to have taken refuge in underground cities, which they had terraformed inside of gigantic natural caves and subterranean caverns.
 

ilinda

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Re: Archaeological finds
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2017, 05:08:45 PM »
https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/300-000-old-skulls-look-170000779.html

300,000-year-old skulls that look shockingly like ours could rewrite the human origin story

 Erin Brodwin,Business Insider Wed, Jun 7 12:00 PM CDT

(Anthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin showing off one of the finds, a crushed human skull whose eye orbits are visible just beyond his fingertip.Shannon McPherron, MPI EVA Leipzig) 
Precisely when and where did our species emerge? Anthropologists have struggled with that question for decades, and scattered clues had suggested the answer lay somewhere in sub-Saharan Africa about 200,000 years ago.
But new evidence outlined in twopapers published in the journal Nature challenges that hypothesis. Instead, the authors describe recently discovered remains that suggest the first Homo sapiens showed up more than 100,000 years earlier than we thought in a place many experts didn't suspect.
The fossils could represent the earliest known examples of H. sapiens ever found (if confirmed by further research), and they serve as evidence that members of our species lived beyond sub-Saharan Africa.

Skulls in the dust
In 1961, a crew of miners was plowing into a dense wall of limestone in a hilly region west of Marrakesh when they struck a soft patch. The hardened beige surface gave way to a mound of cinnamon-colored dirt. Peeking out of the earth was a sliver of human skull.
A bit more digging revealed a nearly-complete skull, which the miners turned over to their field doctor. As word about the discovery spread, researchers flocked to the area. They uncovered more remains, including several pieces of jaw bone and a fragment of an arm. At the time, scientists pegged the fossils as roughly 40,000 years old, a few thousand years before our extinct European relatives, the Neanderthals, were thought to have vanished.

But they hadn't dug deep enough.
(The Jebel Irhoud site in Morocco.Shannon McPherron, MPI EVA Leipzig) 
Roughly 40 years later, anthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin and his team from the Max Planck Institute excavated the half-dozen layers of soil beneath the land where the skull and arm bones had been discovered. There, the team found remains that they say belong to at least five individuals, along with a set of flint blades which had likely been burned, perhaps by nearby cooking fires. 
Using a dating technique that measures how much radiation had built up in the flint since it was heated, Hublin and his team say the ancient bones belong to people who lived roughly 300,000-350,000 years ago. 
"These dates were a big wow," Hublin said on a recent call with reporters.
Still, the biggest discovery didn't come until the team looked more closely at the skulls.

A striking resemblance
When Hublin peered into the cavernous eye sockets of one of the skulls, he was astonished.
Instead of the robust features he was accustomed to seeing on the faces of an ancient human ancestor like Homo erectus or Homo heidelbergensis, this face bore a striking resemblance to his own. Where an erectus skull had a single, protruding brow ridge, these individuals had smaller, separated ones. Rather than a large face and a flattened skull, these people had small faces and rounder skulls.
"The face of these people is really a face that falls right in the middle of the modern variation," said Hublin. "They had a skull that is more elongated than most of us, but I’m not sure these people would stand out from a crowd today."
Their braincase (shown below in blue) also seemed to fall somewhere between what one might expect in an ancient human ancestor and a modern human, albeit slightly more similar to those of our archaic ancestors.
(Philipp Gunz, MPI EVA Leipzig)
This unique combination of advanced and archaic features suggests something profound, Hublin said — he's convinced the Moroccan specimens "represent the very root of our species."
In other words, all of the Homo sapiens ever found — including those uncovered far beyond Africa — may trace their ancestral linkages to the land that is today's Morocco. 
That suggestion contradicts the prevailing anthropological logic that our species evolved somewhere deep in sub-Saharan Africa, in what some researchers have referred to as a "Garden of Eden," then gradually moved out to other parts of the world. Instead, Hublin and his team argue that Homo sapiens could have been living in terrain across Africa.
"There is no Garden of Eden in Africa, or if there is, it is all of Africa," Hublin said.
According to Sonia Zakrzewski, an associate professor of archaeology at the University of Southampton, Hublin's discovery could encourage other archaeologists to change the way they think about human origins. "It really sets the world alight in terms of the possibilities for understanding the evolution of Homo sapiens," she said. "It certainly means that we need to rethink our models."