Author Topic: Videos - Survival Structures  (Read 6498 times)

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 12:28:22 AM »
Earth Walls: Cob and Straw Bale Construction in Wisconsin  26:40

video link  https://youtu.be/FZS2ZEN2bTs

Uploaded on Sep 26, 2011
Directed by Tona Williams (2005)
Starring Randy Gates, Marlin Nissen and Serenity Wehrenberg
As seen on Wisconsin Public Television and the Wisconsin Film Festival

« Last Edit: September 12, 2016, 12:48:26 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2016, 01:12:39 AM »
Basic Cob Tutorial  12:34

https://youtu.be/S_83Nsf0z1s

Uploaded on Feb 8, 2012
Carlos introduces some simple cob construction techniques. PLEASE know that this is for demonstration purposes. Mixing cob can go MUCH faster. I did this slowly so people would know how to do it. I get a lot of comments about how slow it is. YES, if you move slowly, it is slow. if you move quickly with a group, it can move very quickly.

Yowbarb

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2016, 01:32:17 AM »
Eco Dome, Building a Small Home

https://youtu.be/zcElYoMcrmo

Socrates

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Cobbing... What?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2016, 02:36:22 AM »
I can't stress it enough: so-called straw bale building isn't about "straw bales" in principle. Rather, it is about making any kind of 'brick' out of any kind of dry organic matter available [pine needles, leaves, straw, hay, etc. etc.], bundling it together and building with it.
Why?
Because it creates a natural package that contains air, actually. It's really all about the air. Air insulates but how do you readily, easily and cheaply trap air? The answer: dead and dry organic matter.

Does your 'brick' have to be rectangular or otherwise evenly shaped?
Hell, no!
Whatever you can pile on top of each other to build a wall or structure to protect you from the elements, it is fine. If you can pile SNOW [igloos!], what have you actually got? You have the most CONDUSIVE ELEMENT ON EARTH (i.e. water) trapping air and saving your life because it insulates you from the cold...

After you have covered your 'bricks' with cob or something similar [thinking of lime, especially] you have ensured that your dry organic matter remains dry (i.e. that it will continue to trap air that insulates you from the elements).
That's it. That's 'all' this is about. However, compaired to all the models out there that demand high-tech, labor-intensivef or expensive aspects, so-called straw bale building is cheap, easy, user-friendly, fast and basic.
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Socrates

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Re: Cobbing... What?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2016, 05:08:59 AM »
the most CONDUSIVE ELEMENT ON EARTH (i.e. water)
sorry; that, of course, should read "conductive" ;D
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Yowbarb

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Re: Cobbing... What?
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2016, 05:10:16 PM »
I can't stress it enough: so-called straw bale building isn't about "straw bales" in principle. Rather, it is about making any kind of 'brick' out of any kind of dry organic matter available [pine needles, leaves, straw, hay, etc. etc.], bundling it together and building with it.
Why?
Because it creates a natural package that contains air, actually. It's really all about the air. Air insulates but how do you readily, easily and cheaply trap air? The answer: dead and dry organic matter.

Does your 'brick' have to be rectangular or otherwise evenly shaped?
Hell, no!
Whatever you can pile on top of each other to build a wall or structure to protect you from the elements, it is fine. If you can pile SNOW [igloos!], what have you actually got? You have the most CONDUSIVE ELEMENT ON EARTH (i.e. water) trapping air and saving your life because it insulates you from the cold...

After you have covered your 'bricks' with cob or something similar [thinking of lime, especially] you have ensured that your dry organic matter remains dry (i.e. that it will continue to trap air that insulates you from the elements).
That's it. That's 'all' this is about. However, compaired to all the models out there that demand high-tech, labor-intensivef or expensive aspects, so-called straw bale building is cheap, easy, user-friendly, fast and basic.

Sounds good, Socrates. Agreed, strawbale survival structures do not have to be straw.
Can you add some videos here about the faster, more down to earth methods of making a strawbale home?
It would be helpful to have good tutorial videos on your suggested method, included in this Topic.
I do agree it would be a real lifesaver if people knew how to do this...and fast, with whatever materials they find.
Post any videos or exact instructions you have,
Thanks,
Barb T.

Socrates

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Re: Cobbing... What?
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2016, 11:00:29 PM »
making a strawbale home?
It would be helpful to have good tutorial videos on your suggested method
Actually, what i'm trying to make clear is that it's a PRINCIPLE, not a method per se.
The principle in this case is that all you need is to collect dry organic matter and tie/bundle it together. That takes some kind of rope.
Then you stake and tie the bundles together with more rope and dry sticks [preferably pointy].

If there's a method involved in this at all, it concerns the rope. If you don't have it (or not enough of it) what do you do?
I did find 2 nice vids on this, one on how to use yarn to make rope and one how to make rope out of grass:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7q6GOD0AFPU
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DljWyRQFrNc

After you have built something with your organic bundle-bricks, you throw mud and straw on it; the straw [or dry grass] stops the mud from cracking while it's drying. [Throw mud, then press straw into it.]
Now let's define this mud
When you follow a stream or river, you will find clay at places where particles that have been carried along by the water were able to sink and collect over a long period of time. That's because clay is partly aluminum and where do you find aluminum in nature? Often together with iron as red dirt. In countries with monsoon rains, the dirt becomes very muddy and the heaviest particles sink down to the bottom of the mud. Now, monsoon means that a periiod of intense precipitation is followed by many months of dryness. During these dry periods [i'm talking processes that take centuries or millennia here] aluminum and iron are firmly locked into place at the bottom of mud deposits.
I'm telling this just to illustrate how ALUMINUM acts in nature; and the same happens in rivers or streams, i.e. that aluminum sinks and collects. But in this case [i.e.not  in monsoon situations] it turns into clay. So then you maybe have an idea where to go looking for clay if you haven't already run into any deposits [which is common enough since it can be found in many places].
Mix the clay with dirt and dry organic matter and you have cob.

That's it. That's all you have to realize and remember.
Frankly, i think it all comes down to having [or being able to make!] rope, quickly and easily. And the vid on rope from grass teaches how quickly and easily that can be accomplished, i.e. you should always be able to make at least some rope.

CLAY@wikipedia:
Like all phyllosilicates, clay minerals are characterised by two-dimensional sheets of corner sharing SiO4 tetrahedra and/or AlO4 octahedra. The sheet units have the chemical composition (Al,Si)3O4. Each silica tetrahedron shares 3 of its vertex oxygen atoms with other tetrahedra forming a hexagonal array in two-dimensions. The fourth vertex is not shared with another tetrahedron and all of the tetrahedra "point" in the same direction; i.e. all of the unshared vertices are on the same side of the sheet.
In clays, the tetrahedral sheets are always bonded to octahedral sheets formed from small cations, such as aluminium or magnesium, and coordinated by six oxygen atoms.

Clay minerals typically form over long periods of time as a result of the gradual chemical weathering of rocks, usually silicate-bearing, by low concentrations of carbonic acid and other diluted solvents. These solvents, usually acidic, migrate through the weathering rock after leaching through upper weathered layers.

There are two types of clay deposits: primary and secondary. Primary clays form as residual deposits in soil and remain at the site of formation. Secondary clays are clays that have been transported from their original location by water erosion and deposited in a new sedimentary deposit.[4] Clay deposits are typically associated with very low energy depositional environments such as large lakes and marine basins.
Depending on the academic source, there are three or four main groups of clays: kaolinite, montmorillonite-smectite, illite, and chlorite. Chlorites are not always considered a clay, sometimes being classified as a separate group within the phyllosilicates. There are approximately 30 different types of "pure" clays in these categories, but most "natural" clay deposits are mixtures of these different types, along with other weathered minerals


Acids-aluminum-acid rain
Apparently, so-called acid rain can be attributed to the effect of acids on the aluminum in the soil. [Because of this, one can assume that aluminum cooking utensils are safe as long as no acidic ingredients are involved.] So in the development of soil there's some chemistry involved that, likely, goes beyong what you need or desire to know. Having said that, accept that aluminum is a key component to clay.


Would you like to know how to make aluminum after TSHTF?
Anyway, aluminum is one of the most prominently present elements on Earth and they're also a key component of clays.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 02:20:29 AM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: Cobbing... What?
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2016, 12:22:24 AM »
making a strawbale home?
It would be helpful to have good tutorial videos on your suggested method
Actually, what i'm trying to make clear is that it's a PRINCIPLE, not a method per se.
The principle in this case is that all you need is to collect dry organic matter and tie/bundle it together. That takes some kind of rope.
Then you stake and tie the bundles together with more rope and dry sticks [preferably pointy].

If there's a method involved in this at all, it concerns the rope. If you don't have it (or not enough of it) what do you do?
I did find 2 nice vids on this, one on how to use yarn to make rope and one how to make rope out of grass:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7q6GOD0AFPU
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DljWyRQFrNc

After you have built something with your organic bundle-bricks, you throw mud and straw on it; the straw [or dry grass] stops the mud from cracking while it's drying. [Throw mud, then press straw into it.]
Now let's define this mud
When you follow a stream or river, you will find clay at places where particles that have been carried along by the water were able to sink and collect over a long period of time. That's because clay is partly aluminum and where do you find aluminum in nature? Often together with iron as red dirt. In countries with monsoon rains, the dirt becomes very muddy and the heaviest particles sink down to the bottom of the mud. Now, monsoon means that a periiod of intense precipitation is followed by many months of dryness. During these dry periods [i'm talking processes that take centuries or millennia here] aluminum and iron are firmly locked into place at the bottom of mud deposits.
I'm telling this just to illustrate how ALUMINUM acts in nature; and the same happens in rivers or streams, i.e. that aluminum sinks and collects. But in this case [i.e.not  in monsoon situations] it turns into clay. So then you maybe have an idea where to go looking for clay if you haven't already run into any deposits [which is common enough since it can be found in many places].
Mix the clay with dirt and dry organic matter and you have cob.

That's it. That's all you have to realize and remember.
Frankly, i think it all comes down to having [or being able to make!] rope, quickly and easily. And the vid on rope from grass teaches how quickly and easily that can be accomplished, i.e. you should always be able to make at least some rope.

There are two types of clay deposits: primary and secondary. Primary clays form as residual deposits in soil and remain at the site of formation. Secondary clays are clays that have been transported from their original location by water erosion and deposited in a new sedimentary deposit.[4] Clay deposits are typically associated with very low energy depositional environments such as large lakes and marine basins.

Socrates, thanks for your post. Quoted some excerpts from it, which seem most pertinent.
Thanks for posting the two videos on making rope out of yarn and rope out of grass.
Could be a real life saver.
Learned a few things about clay, there.
If you can find instructional videos on people making fast survival structures out of natural dry materials, rope and clay please post them...
I will be looking for them too.
Good concepts. Survival on the move.

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The Kochanski Super Shelter
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2016, 05:05:26 AM »
Well, there always the Super Shelter.
You just need to have a tarp, mylar sheets and some bigger pieces of plastic.

more options here
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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2016, 06:26:23 PM »
So this is a short vid on cobbing straw bales, to give an idea of how (simple it is) to do it:
- slap 'mud' onto straw [see how in the vid]
- take some straw and press it into the wet mud on the wall

Now, this video does not go into the ingredients of cob or other ways of making it. For instance, i've also seen people mixing straw in with dirt and clay, rather than pressing straw onto wet mud walls.
In the end it's also just about what materials you have at hand since people have been building with cow dung for millennia, too....
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ilinda

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2016, 05:14:36 PM »
So this is a short vid on cobbing straw bales, to give an idea of how (simple it is) to do it:
- slap 'mud' onto straw [see how in the vid]
- take some straw and press it into the wet mud on the wall

Now, this video does not go into the ingredients of cob or other ways of making it. For instance, i've also seen people mixing straw in with dirt and clay, rather than pressing straw onto wet mud walls.
In the end it's also just about what materials you have at hand since people have been building with cow dung for millennia, too....
Now, I'm totallly intrigued by this stuff, as our micro-greenhouse is about to go up and this looks like the right stuff (except for the glass/plexiglas/Lexan "windows".  It does look rather easy, and very forgiving when it comes to leveling.  It appears that eyeballing a tiny structure might be enough for a microgreenhouse.  At any rate, lots of good information and ideas.

Thanks for posting, Socrates, as this is worth watching a number of times.

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2016, 02:58:31 PM »
Regarding the dome shape that is so tornado resistant, as well as quake resistant, I'm attaching here several pics of that school near us that is only about 15 years old or so.

There are five domes that could be seen from the road, and according to a friend whose daughter is about to be enrolled there, grade school, junior high, and high school are all contained within this set of domes.

In the dome on the right, the sign tells us it's an elementary school building, and of course the playground equipment is a big clue as well.  This school is between the Missouri towns of Caledonia and Belgrade, but a bit closer to Caledonia.

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Re: Videos - Survival Structures
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2016, 03:08:57 PM »
So this is a short vid on cobbing straw bales, to give an idea of how (simple it is) to do it:
- slap 'mud' onto straw [see how in the vid]
- take some straw and press it into the wet mud on the wall

Now, this video does not go into the ingredients of cob or other ways of making it. For instance, i've also seen people mixing straw in with dirt and clay, rather than pressing straw onto wet mud walls.
In the end it's also just about what materials you have at hand since people have been building with cow dung for millennia, too....
The video does make it look rather easy.   A friend told us he has helped on a couple of cobbing ventures and the thing he emphasized was that the sand portion of the mix is important, and that you will need more sand than you initially think because the sand particles must bind to the clay particles to make a tight bond.  Well, other stuff is important also.

 Around here, sand is plentiful along the river banks, actually on the sandbars that are too long and too big, so removing some is actually beneficial to the river, and the amount we would remove for one building is miniscule compared to the size of some of these sandbars.

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Re: Domes
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2016, 06:40:01 PM »
Regarding the dome shape that is so tornado resistant, as well as quake resistant, I'm attaching here several pics of that school near us that is only about 15 years old or so.
I am very excited about domes but am still going to be a downer here...
Even concrete domes will probably not save you from either radiation or Planet X destruction. After all, our ancestors were wiped into the stone age and they also must've been able to build such things (since they built things like Puma Punku that we can't even duplify today, even if we tried).

Having said that, AFTER the tribulations domes are a wonderful method, style and structure for building. They are efficient, strong and resilient. They are beautiful, logical and make good sense.

Stories of previous survivors tell how they came from underground where they were safe from storm, radiation and probably from other people as well. All i'm saying is: domes are great [i myself have literally been looking into them for over a decade] but ain't nothin' like a cave to face the future.
Of course this post is on "survival structures", but what KIND of survival? You may find yourself homeless after this year's troubles but you likely won't be able to set up a dome quickly; on the other hand, i once set one up (with some help) in 20 minutes... So if you can get your hands on some straw bales, a dome shape is great. If you have some concrete to pour over the top, you may actually end up with something like the pics you posted.

Japanese in previous ages used to experience earthquakes so often that they would actually have the building blocks for a new home BURIED UNDERNEATH THE ONE THEY WERE LIVING IN. You see, they lived in houses with rice paper walls so they just put up new poles and new paper and roofs. (Earthquakes would inevitably create fires that would often burn hole communities down to the ground.)
Similarly, there are dome building sets. Maybe you can get your hands on one of those.
DIY instructions


How to build a 20ft PVC geodesic dome
« Last Edit: October 06, 2016, 07:05:34 PM by Socrates »
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