Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 9903 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #90 on: July 22, 2017, 03:29:08 PM »
Ilinda, I received your envelope today with the Yamiken squash seeds - thank you so much, I'm really looking forward to planting them next growing season (whenever that may occur...) :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #91 on: July 22, 2017, 04:27:43 PM »
Ilinda, I received your envelope today with the Yamiken squash seeds - thank you so much, I'm really looking forward to planting them next growing season (whenever that may occur...) :)
They are a long season crop (120 d or so) but can be planted in early May, for example, by covering with a gallon, plastic vinegar bottle (bottom cut out), and with no lid (except for cool nights).  The vinegar jug acts as a mini-greenhouse as you already know, and once weather warms jug can be removed.  This year I was late in planting them, but for some reason they've gone crazy.  Best crop ever and I promise to take a pic of the Yamiken bed. 

Also, for the past few years I've gotten in the habit of starting them indoors in medium pots (not in those tiny 72-cell trays), and they get a good start with easily controlled conditions before facing the outside world, and this really helps.  BTW, they store well at room temperature, or perhaps 60 deg. F, and last for months and months.  You will not be let down.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #92 on: July 23, 2017, 05:24:30 PM »
This is a pic of my Yamiken bed.  They look like our best Yamiken crop ever--so robust and reaching out everywhere, including toward those sweet potatoes over to the right, which I'm afraid will get covered. 

Because we live "in the woods" everything has to be fenced, double and triple sometimes.  The concrete blocks on the left are the back wall of the "olive house" which houses the two young olive trees, and the fence in lower right protects some Tohono O'odham, 60-day flour corn.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #93 on: July 24, 2017, 06:22:54 AM »
The Yamiken looks very happy in that spot.  My Seminole pumpkin is also taking over the blueberry patch here - have had to cut it out of the blueberry bushes and train the vines to grow away from them!  Will look for the Tohono O'odham corn.  That reminds me of their Man in the Maze corn stalk baskets, which instruct them how to find their way back inside their ancestral caves when the cataclysm time comes:
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 06:33:39 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #94 on: July 24, 2017, 11:06:40 AM »
The Yamiken looks very happy in that spot.  My Seminole pumpkin is also taking over the blueberry patch here - have had to cut it out of the blueberry bushes and train the vines to grow away from them!  Will look for the Tohono O'odham corn.  That reminds me of their Man in the Maze corn stalk baskets, which instruct them how to find their way back inside their ancestral caves when the cataclysm time comes:
Now about this "Man in the Maze corn stalk baskets, which instruct them how to find their way back inside their ancestral caves when the cataclysm time comes".....  Just curious about the source of this story.  Seems as if it could be based in reality.

You have more nerve than I when it comes to cutting vines out.  I'd probably only be able to lift them and try to re-route them, and even that entails tearing the little tendrils that seem to hang on to anything and everything.

Tohono O'odham is available through Native Seed Search based in Arizona, although it may be sold other places as well. 

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #95 on: July 24, 2017, 01:46:29 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Yes, I would have preferred to disentangle rather than cut too, but the blueberry patch has shrubs with staggered ripening times for a longer harvest, and the un-ripe blueberries were in danger of being knocked down to the ground had I overly handled the branches (I had not been in the patch for several days, and the vine had suddenly had a Little Shop of Horrors growth spurt in my absence) :)

The Man in the Maze story is part of the foundation of Tohono O'odham tribal knowledge about its origins and the cyclical nature of time, as opposed to the Eurocentric linear view of time.  It is not clear to me whether the Tohono O'odham originated beneath the surface of the earth, or had retreated there to ride out the flood, but their basket pattern is supposed to help them remember the way back.  Note that they consider themselves to be of a pre-existing separate origin from the "clay people:"

Pima/Tohono O’odham Creation Story
And Flood Story
(Southwestern USA)

(This is really a post-flood re-creation story)

Creator Spirits named Earthmaker and Itoi
Became unhappy with the people of their first creation
And decided to destroy them in a flood.

Before the flood they had a contest:
They agreed to hide in caves during the flood,
And whoever emerged first after the flood
Would be the Elder Brother, and the new Creator

Itoi won.
He made new people out of clay and cared for them,
But then he quarreled with them
And the people plotted to kill him.

He went underground and found help
From the Tohono O’odham and the Pima tribes.
They helped Itoi drive away the clay people.
As a reward, Itoi gave them the land to live on
And taught them rainmaking ceremonies.


Thanks for the information about sourcing the seeds! :)
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 02:12:03 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #96 on: July 24, 2017, 03:54:46 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Yes, I would have preferred to disentangle rather than cut too, but the blueberry patch has shrubs with staggered ripening times for a longer harvest, and the un-ripe blueberries were in danger of being knocked down to the ground had I overly handled the branches (I had not been in the patch for several days, and the vine had suddenly had a Little Shop of Horrors growth spurt in my absence) :)

The Man in the Maze story is part of the foundation of Tohono O'odham tribal knowledge about its origins and the cyclical nature of time, as opposed to the Eurocentric linear view of time.  It is not clear to me whether the Tohono O'odham originated beneath the surface of the earth, or had retreated there to ride out the flood, but their basket pattern is supposed to help them remember the way back.  Note that they consider themselves to be of a pre-existing separate origin from the "clay people:"

Pima/Tohono O’odham Creation Story
And Flood Story
(Southwestern USA)

(This is really a post-flood re-creation story)

Creator Spirits named Earthmaker and Itoi
Became unhappy with the people of their first creation
And decided to destroy them in a flood.

Before the flood they had a contest:
They agreed to hide in caves during the flood,
And whoever emerged first after the flood
Would be the Elder Brother, and the new Creator

Itoi won.
He made new people out of clay and cared for them,
But then he quarreled with them
And the people plotted to kill him.

He went underground and found help
From the Tohono O’odham and the Pima tribes.
They helped Itoi drive away the clay people.
As a reward, Itoi gave them the land to live on
And taught them rainmaking ceremonies.


Thanks for the information about sourcing the seeds! :)
Fascinating story!  Who knows how much is myth and how much is based on actual events.  The Native peoples on this continent are said by some to have non-Earthly origins, and after having read several of Sitchin's books, as well as some by Tellinger, my mind is open to a lot of stuff that MS people will reject.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #97 on: September 05, 2017, 05:11:04 PM »
This is just a Yamiken update, about that Peruvian winter squash with long growing season, and which is sweeter than butternut, and a bit less watery, if cooked properly.

The Yamiken are literally taking over the garden and I'm letting them.  The only reason they haven't brought down the corn (yet) is the fencing around the corn is stabilizing it.  I always wondered why initially there would be dozens and dozens, maybe a hundred or so, male blossoms on the squash plants, and it always seemed like months before I'd see even one female flower. 

Well, I read somewhere that the reason for the preponderance of male blossoms early on is that the blossom fragrance will attract the appropriate pollinators from all around, and once they are around and busy visiting the male flowers, the females can form--and then the pollinators can work their magic.
(Edit:  attach latest pic)

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #98 on: September 06, 2017, 10:11:10 AM »
Ilinda, It looks as if you have one heck of a green thumb.  That vine looks unstoppable! :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #99 on: September 06, 2017, 05:08:44 PM »
Ilinda, It looks as if you have one heck of a green thumb.  That vine looks unstoppable! :)
The truth is that this is the first year that the goat manure compost seems to have become completely usable to the garden and it is absolutely the best garden we've ever seen.  Thanks to this compost--now we can see the results of cleaning out the goat sheds every day and hauling it to its composting spot(s).

 It seems to take about five years for it to be broken down completely and it's truly better than gold.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #100 on: September 07, 2017, 06:10:08 PM »
Quote
It seems to take about five years for it to be broken down completely and it's truly better than gold.

Sounds like good stuff!  We also find the hen litter to be good for the garden - just the right NPK balance and won't burn plants when used right away, as it's mixed with old hay.

We're enjoying the pics of your garden - hope you post some more!

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #101 on: September 08, 2017, 06:30:44 PM »
Quote
It seems to take about five years for it to be broken down completely and it's truly better than gold.

Sounds like good stuff!  We also find the hen litter to be good for the garden - just the right NPK balance and won't burn plants when used right away, as it's mixed with old hay.

We're enjoying the pics of your garden - hope you post some more!
Yes, chicken litter is excellent stuff and you can probably get some almost every day, unless you want to let it pile up a bit.  Don't some people clean out the henhouse several times a year, leaving some for "starter", but several times a year you get "gold".  How often do you clean out and renew with hay?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #102 on: September 09, 2017, 10:14:40 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

The little duck house has to be replenished daily, as duck excrement is more liquid due to all the water they drink and their preference for greens as food.  Henhouse gets cleaned out once a week during fair weather when they're pastured, and occasionally twice a week during foul-weather confinement, which at a minimum amounts to a one-month period in winter, unless Px changes the routine.  I figure that we might go through a couple of two-twine bales of hay every month, which @ $5 per bale is nothing compared with the cost of caring for larger livestock.

Wheel barrow is right next to the henhouse, and old litter goes straight to the open gardens along with grass clippings and dead leaves, where the hens are allowed to work it in the open air and further break it down into good quick compost.  The worm houses receive all the veggie and fruit scraps, which they turn into priceless castings that go straight on the gardens once a year in autumn.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2017, 07:12:03 PM by R.R. Book »

Socrates

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #103 on: September 09, 2017, 10:30:59 AM »
We also find the hen litter to be good for the garden - just the right NPK balance and won't burn plants when used right away, as it's mixed with old hay.
The sources i've found suggest that the nitrogen-rich chicken waste combines with carbon-rich sources like hay or wood chips to make good soil like any compost pile does. Let the chickens sh*t on 'carbon' and there will be no odour and you'll have a complete end product to bring to your veggies.
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R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #104 on: September 09, 2017, 10:58:23 AM »
Hi Socrates,

I totally agree, as long as air is circulating.  During winter confinement, ammonia build up needs to be watched and prevented.  Coop windows can stay cracked a tad until temps plunge down to the teens or lower in January.  Hay not only absorbs ammonia up to a point, but it also absorbs respiration vapors during confinement, helping to maintain an oxygen-rich environment.

One of the nice things about hens is that their urine is naturally combined with their poop, rather than being separate, so unless their diet is off, it all comes out in a nice compact package. :)

Unfortunately, watermelon season isn't quite over with yet here...