Author Topic: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes  (Read 3657 times)

Socrates

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Re: Bee suits...
« Reply #45 on: August 10, 2017, 11:08:12 PM »
well they were white years ago
ROFL
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Socrates

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #46 on: August 10, 2017, 11:44:11 PM »
it's too late this year to order and install bees, but am pondering building hive(s) and waiting to catch a swarm.
is it too late?
Seriously; i don't know enough about beekeeping to know.

I have ordered the book [i.e. Freeman's], for one, since all this 'tapping' and stuff indeed offends my sympathetic sensibilities [I mean, why can't we have honey without honoring the bees that produce it?].
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R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2017, 07:36:16 AM »
Quote
Do you think it's too late to "build it and they will come"?  IOW, it's too late this year to order and install bees, but am pondering building hive(s) and waiting to catch a swarm.

Ilinda,

There are summer bee colonies for sale, but the question is whether you can help them prepare their winter stores in time.  If you got them now, and pushed home-made feed in addition to whatever forage they will accumulate from autumn flowers, you could intervene until maybe Thanksgiving at the latest, choosing warm days on which to open the hive for any in-hive feedings.  Or you could do open field feeding, leaving syrup buckets a short distance from the hive, with the understanding that other critters will also have access. 

Patties may be better for cool/cold weather feeding, as bees must be out of their winter cluster to be able to fan syrup/nectar with their wings to dry and thicken it for storage.  So for autumn liquid feedings, you may want to switch to 1:1 or 2:1 sugar to water, rather than the less expensive 1:2 ratio.  Either way you'll probably want to keep the entrance reduced as narrow as possible to prevent robbing.

Am guessing you still have all of your old equipment on hand, so why not take the risk?

You're sort of near both the central and southeastern region of MO, right?.  Here's a link to contact info for 4 associations in your state's east central region: http://mostatebeekeepers.org/club-directory/wpbdp_category/east-central/

And here's a link to 5 associations in the southeast portion of MO: http://mostatebeekeepers.org/club-directory/wpbdp_category/southeast/

Surely someone would work with you :)

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2017, 06:43:55 PM »
it's too late this year to order and install bees, but am pondering building hive(s) and waiting to catch a swarm.
is it too late?
Seriously; i don't know enough about beekeeping to know.

I have ordered the book [i.e. Freeman's], for one, since all this 'tapping' and stuff indeed offends my sympathetic sensibilities [I mean, why can't we have honey without honoring the bees that produce it?].
The beekeepers I have talked to here and there usually tell me (each year) that I need to get my order in for bees by April (it seems that time, IIRC).  So, if you don't get your bees established early when the flowers are blooming, then they will have very little with which to make honey.  They don't make honey in the winter--that's when they eat it.

?Why can't we have honey without honoring the bees that produce it?  We can, but when one ponders all the community effort that goes into honey bee life, and the sacrifices they make, all the while we steal them blind half of the time, without even saying "thanks", it only makes sense (to me) to honor them.

Without Nature, none of us would be here.

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #49 on: September 16, 2017, 07:18:00 PM »


Suggested order of operations for putting on a bee suit:

When we first began keeping bees a decade ago, I found that it took some trial and error to be able to suit-up quickly and efficiently.

First, I strongly recommend the use of one-piece suits, including the zip-on veil.  I used the tie-down veil the first few years and occasionally ended up sharing the interior of it with one or more distraught bees right near my face, though was never stung that way because the bees were more interested in how to escape.  Still, it can be nerve-wracking and a distraction from the task at-hand.

Since you'll likely be working your bees in a secluded area, it doesn't really matter what you're wearing underneath the suit, and frankly in hot weather it can be more comfortable to keep it to a minimum.  I have learned always to start with a pair of socks, because the suit legs have elasticized ankles which restrict doing it any other way.

Next come the Playtex or other gloves that are thick enough to provide a barrier, but lend themselves to manual dexterity.  Stingers can still penetrate Playtex, but only slightly unless the fit is skin tight.  With the right fit, it can be mildly amusing to feel an attempted sting that doesn't penetrate as intended.  :)

Next step is to slip arms and legs into the suit, leaving the arm part of the gloves covered up to the elasticized wrists, and socks covered down to the elasticized ankles.  Then zip the torso zipper and the left and right veil zippers and secure the velcro cover over the zippers to prevent them from coming open.  If you didn't check the back velcro zipper-cover flap on the veil before putting the suit on, might want to check in a mirror.

It will be necessary to lower the veil hat in place on the head as the torso zipper is being pulled up, and some beekeepers like to have a headband in place ahead of time, as the hats are notorious for fitting too loosely.  Lastly, slip into a good thick pair of pull-on boots, such as calf-high muck boots. 

Living in an old-fashioned part of the country where ladies often still wear ankle-length dresses, I have occasionally worked my bees dressed like the women in this picture, without being stung. :)



Socrates

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Re: feeding bees
« Reply #50 on: September 16, 2017, 07:31:16 PM »
If you got them now, and pushed home-made feed in addition to whatever forage they will accumulate from autumn flowers, you could intervene until maybe Thanksgiving at the latest, choosing warm days on which to open the hive for any in-hive feedings.  Or you could do open field feeding, leaving syrup buckets a short distance from the hive, with the understanding that other critters will also have access. 

Patties may be better for cool/cold weather feeding, as bees must be out of their winter cluster to be able to fan syrup/nectar with their wings to dry and thicken it for storage.  So for autumn liquid feedings, you may want to switch to 1:1 or 2:1 sugar to water, rather than the less expensive 1:2 ratio.  Either way you'll probably want to keep the entrance reduced as narrow as possible to prevent robbing.
As we're really talking production here [as i'm not], why can't one just get a bunch of bees and give them real honey to survive on to get them through however long a time without flowers? It would be an investment but North America went without honeybees until Europeans brought them over, i.e. it's likely one wouldn't even find any bees out in the wild to attract to a perfectly good (empty) hive.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2017, 12:39:00 AM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #51 on: September 16, 2017, 07:41:45 PM »
Just be aware that someone else's honey, which you'd need possibly the first year, may contain deadly microbes that could cause your colony to collapse and loss of your investment.  Unless maybe you opted for pasteurized honey, which may be lacking in nutrients that distinguish raw honey from sugar syrup.  Since I've already lost three expensive Russian colonies to-date, I won't take any chances going into the Tribulation.

Would love more discussion on this though if you should decide to pursue some research :)

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #52 on: October 10, 2017, 12:51:58 PM »
The neighbor behind me, who happens to be very friendly about our apiary, has shared that the bees have been visiting her holly tree in large numbers this year (we're the only beekeepers in the area as far as we are aware, so assume they may be ours, or at least past swarms of ours).  I was not aware that holly even flowered, but sure enough it does have a less showy inflorescence.  Interesting that bees are often attracted to flowers that we find less attractive, and I guess it does make sense that any plant that fruits must also flower.

Posting a generic photo of bees on holly, as I was unable to get a photo here: