Planet X Town Hall

NativeMom72 - THE DIVINE FEMININE => Ways Of Our Past => Topic started by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2010, 12:15:04 PM

Title: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2010, 12:15:04 PM
On the old forum in Post It All And Let Blog Sort It Out we had a thread
called, Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
So here it is again.

PRAYER FOR THE TRUTH lonewolf13scott |   3:39      7,075 views
January 26, 2009 | 87 likes, 1 dislikes
"A song of hope and peace from the Native Americans point of view. Beautifully written by Bill Miller & John Flanagan. Sung by Bill Miller. This video is dedicated to my father."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hQwdA3fQZ8
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2010, 12:27:05 PM
While I was looking for a Native American/Americana quilt - just stumbled across some lovely sites with crafts, quilts,
artwork and music produced
by Native Americans.
I haven't verified these are all Native sites but they surely look like they are.
Here's one, which has links to several Native American artists:
http://www.prairieedge.com/ (http://www.prairieedge.com/)
Crafts, ceramics, fine art, music books, jewelry clothing items etc.

     
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2010, 12:31:22 PM

http://www.prairieedge.com/category/24/203/ (http://www.prairieedge.com/category/24/203/)
This page has the books the site offers, all about ancient Native American tales.
Might be interesting reading - wonder how they compare to the Kolbrin etc.

http://www.prairieedge.com/item/11464/24/203 (http://www.prairieedge.com/item/11464/24/203)  Ancient Memory & Other Stories, The
John G. Neihardt. Soft Cover.

- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 22, 2010, 08:35:02 AM
Mt. Lemmon NOAA Weather Radio transmitter is down  http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/nwr/nwr_outage.php (http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/nwr/nwr_outage.php)
THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO LOCATED ON MT. LEMMON WENT OFF THE AIR LATE LAST NIGHT DUE TO THE DETERIORATING CONDITIONS AT THE SITE OF THE TRANSMITTER...THE NOAA WEATHER RADIO TRANSMITTER IN TUCSON WILL BE DOWN UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. USERS CAN STILL TUNE INTO THE NOGALES TRANSMITTER...WNG703 AT 162.500 MHZ. OR THE SAFFORD TRANSMITTER AT KXI24 AT 162.550 MHZ.   

January's record rainfall across SE Arizona http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/climate/JanuaryRCDprecip.php (http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/climate/JanuaryRCDprecip.php)

[HLN News this AM State of Arizona and the Navajo Nation are declared a State of Emergency.  Note from Yowbarb]
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/ (http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/) This page shows the blizzard watches winter storm warnings etc.

- Yowbarb
Link to reports below, many of them having to do with damage at Indian Nations in the area

http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/total_forecast/getprod.php?wfo=twc&prod=XXXLSRTWC&version=0&print=yes (http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/total_forecast/getprod.php?wfo=twc&prod=XXXLSRTWC&version=0&print=yes)

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 28, 2010, 10:29:32 PM
Indian Country today

Health care reform signed into law
By Rob Capriccioso

Story Published: Mar 26, 2010
Image, Yvette Roubideax second from left Rosebud Sioux director of the Indian Health Services(http://nihrecord.od.nih.gov/newsletters/10_19_99/images/indian2.jpg)

Yvette Roubideaux, the Rosebud Sioux director of the IHS, spoke before Indian leaders last fall. She has long been advocating for the reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act.

WASHINGTON
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Lori on March 30, 2010, 04:54:58 AM
This is kind of long winded but it was well worth posting all of it.  Does this tell of a Previous Nib passage and recreation after?

http://members.cox.net/academia/origins.html (http://members.cox.net/academia/origins.html)

The Jicarilla Genesis (Jicarilla Apache) from James Mooney, American Anthropologist, Vol. XI., No. 7, Washington, D.C., July, 1898, pp. 197-209.


In the beginning the earth was covered with water, and all living things were below in the underworld. Then people could talk, the animals could talk, the trees could talk, and the rocks could talk.

It was dark in the underworld, and they used eagle plumes for torches. The people and the animals that go about by day wanted more light, but the night animals -- the Bear, the Panther, and the Owl -- wanted darkness. They disputed long, and at last agreed to play the k
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 14, 2010, 06:23:43 AM
Native Americans getting into dome homes -

http://www.awarenessmag.com/julaug08/ja08_for_native_americans.htm (http://www.awarenessmag.com/julaug08/ja08_for_native_americans.htm)

For Native Americans ...
Domes Blend Their Ancestral Past with the Modern World
By Carol Lanham
 
 
Deep in the Grand Canyon, in a remote area accessible only on foot, by horseback or by helicopter, a dream is taking shape among members of the Havasupai tribe who inhabit the land. It is a dream for a better way of life, in harmony with their ancestral past yet in step with the realities of the modern world.
It is a dream that began with Uqualla, a Havasupai tribal chief and medicine man, but soon came to involve others throughout the United States. The dream has a name
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 14, 2010, 06:46:10 AM
Native American-built dome - of course when the time comes they will need to seal off those
two entries with the door and window areas -I am sure they will figure it out...
- Yowbarb

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.operationmorningstar.org/36%2520ft%2520dome%2520home.JPG&imgrefurl=http://www.operationmorningstar.org/&usg=__YUKOeUWRx5we-UacrD0l8VI0FUA=&h=400&w=640&sz=76&hl=en&start=3&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=Ho7QSAANl7JYeM:&tbnh=86&tbnw=137&prev=/images%3Fq%3DNative%2BAmericans%2Bdome%2Bhomes%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG%26rls%3Dcom.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox%26rlz%3D1I7ACEW_enUS352US352%26tbs%3Disch:1 
Operation Morningstar -serving Native American needs for 14 years...

On the Operation Morningstar page - a dome home on the res.
- Yowbarb

http://www.operationmorningstar.org/36%20ft%20dome%20home.JPG (http://www.operationmorningstar.org/36%20ft%20dome%20home.JPG)

(http://www.operationmorningstar.org/36%20ft%20dome%20home.JPG)

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Joe Montanna on May 06, 2010, 09:27:38 AM
*NEW* Ancient Aliens 2010: The Mission

Heres the New Episode from the Ancient aliens series. I find it fascinating and i mean really enjoyable to watch.

so enjoy !

Ancient Aliens - The Mission 2010 1/10 [HST-s1e3] (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVesaxxfmaY&feature=player_embedded#ws)
JOE
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 26, 2010, 12:33:22 PM
This page of Sacred Texts website has Native American Religions, with a wealth of old stories and legends.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/index.htm (http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/index.htm)

Native American religion, mythology and folklore are covered extensively at this site:

Aztecs
Californian
Inuit
Maya
Plains
Northeastern
   Iroquois
Northwestern
Southeastern
   Cherokee
Southwestern
   Navajo
   Zu
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 08, 2010, 10:40:16 AM
DThundersLeadSinga | February 21, 2010
2010 Simnasho Oregon pow wow, Mens Traditional Song one,
Lincolns Birthday Pow Wow...

2010 Simnasho Pow Wow *Mens Traditional* **Song 1** (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USsgc1o_MtY#)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 08, 2010, 01:22:06 PM
A search engine for native sites and info, from the last site I posted,
Pow Wows.com   Your Portal to North American Tribal Culture
http://www.powwows.com/calendar/displaymonth.php (http://www.powwows.com/calendar/displaymonth.php)

NativeSeek
Your custom search for native sites search

Indianz.com, Indianzcountry.com, NDNSports.com, NMAI GatheringofNations.com, Powwows.com, and more....

http://powwows.com/ (http://powwows.com/)   
Search engine at site:
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Visit Forum
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 08, 2010, 01:30:59 PM
Here's one in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada.
Women's Jingle Brandon Pow Wow 2010
RYANNEWHITE | February 01, 2010
no description available

Women's Jingle Brandon Pow Wow 2010 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7akir_cY0A#)


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 08, 2010, 01:36:40 PM
This was at Arizona State University -
...
Mens Fancy @ ASU pow wow 2010

fancydancevideos | April 19, 2010
mens fancy dance to old Oklahoma song by southern thunder. sunday afternoon

Mens Fancy @ ASU pow wow 2010 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvknp4WxrFU#ws)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2010, 07:38:49 AM
Native American farmers hopeful about suit involving USDA loans
By Alyse Shorland, CNN July 9, 2010 3:27 p.m. EDT

Porter Holder vividly remembers the day in 1998 when he left a U.S. Department of Agriculture loan office in Oklahoma empty-handed.

He had applied for a low-interest USDA loan to help keep a farm in family ownership. He says he expected his application to be accepted. He had kept his debt at a minimum and developed a plan for supplementing his income. He believes he was turned down because he's Native American, a member of the Choctaw tribe.

"The day I walked out of there, I knew why he denied me," Holder said.

In 1999, He joined other Native Americans in a class-action lawsuit that accused the USDA of discriminatory lending over a 25-year period. USDA loans can be used for purchasing land, livestock, equipment and other operational items.

Video: Where is the settlement money? The lending practices of USDA regional offices have cost Native American farmers hundreds of millions of dollars in potential revenue, their lawyers said, although they added that it's a hard number to estimate because of how many farmers may have been affected. The attorneys say their expert witness, agricultural economist Patrick O'Brien, estimated that over 18 years, Native American farmers received only half the loans they could have expected to obtain.

As a result, many saw their farms foreclosed on and their fields lying fallow.

A recent settlement on behalf of African-American farmers gave Native Americans hope that their case will also be resolved in their favor. Individual black farmers could receive $50,000 each as a result of the case, known as Pigford II.

According to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, there are about 60,000 Native American farmers in the United States -- double the number of African-American farmers. The vast majority of Native American farmers work on family-operated farms.

Holder lives on 320 gently rolling acres in Oklahoma, where he raises cattle. His primary source of income is work as a blacksmith, shoeing horses in his community. With the right amount of financial help, he said, his life could have been different.

[PHOTO on page] George Keepseagle, left, walks with his family in North Dakota. The case against the USDA is named for him."I could have been a rancher," he said. "That's what I wanted to do."

[Yowbarb Note here is a photo from another article]
George Marilyn Keepseagle on their farm in North Dakota.

http://buffalopost.net/wp-content/uploads/Keepseagle1.jpg (http://buffalopost.net/wp-content/uploads/Keepseagle1.jpg)

(http://buffalopost.net/wp-content/uploads/Keepseagle1.jpg)
...
Back to CNN article:
Holder said regional USDA offices repeatedly denied him access to loans. In one instance, he said he was told to "go see [his] tribe."

After the regional office denied him a loan at 4 percent interest, Porter said he received an 8 percent interest loan through a private bank. He purchased the acres he lives on now, but he said the high interest has put a strain on his finances.

"If it was fair, I would be in a different place," he said. "I am thankful to be where I am, don't get me wrong, but I would be in a different place."

The Native Americans' lead counsel, Joseph Sellers, said the USDA loans are vital to the existence of Native American farmers.

"The precondition to getting these kinds of loans is the USDA is regarded as the lender of last resort," he said. "So the people who get these loans have already demonstrated that they can't get loans at two commercial lending institutions. So if they don't get credit from the USDA, they get credit from no one."

O'Brien, formerly with the USDA research service, agreed, saying that USDA loan programs were "limited to operators who cannot obtain sufficient credit at reasonable rates elsewhere but who would be able to operate viable farm businesses if USDA made the loan(s) in question."

I could have been a rancher. That's what I wanted to do.

--Porter Holder, a plaintiff in the class-action lawsuit
 Claryca Mandan says farming is in her blood. Her family was named its county's Farming Family of the Year in 1968. She says credit became almost impossible to get around the time she married her husband, Keith, in 1979. Like Holder, she is Native American and said she remembers when the loan practices of her local USDA office took what she called "an aggressive stance."

Mandan, who was a borrower from the USDA for years, is now a plaintiff in the lawsuit against it.

"It became apparent we were receiving different treatment," she said. "We were given loan amounts that were lesser than we already requested, and we were encouraged to buy the oldest machinery instead of stuff adequate and [the] equivalent to white farmers. We started to receive a lot of resistance from the local county staff."

Mandan said the regional office's stance toward lending was aimed not only at putting Native American farmers at a disadvantage, but at benefiting their non-Native American counterparts. Many Native American farms are on land -- usually in reservations -- that the federal government holds in trusts for the benefit of future generations. The land falls under tribal government authority, but Mandan charged that as more Native American farms defaulted on loans from the government, more farms were offered by the federal government for purchase to farmers who were not Native Americans.

A 1997 report from a civil rights action team to the USDA on the treatment of minority farmers generally, cited in the lawsuit, said that as minority farmers were unable to afford their lands, "The land is lost finally and sold at auction, where it is bought by someone else at half the price being asked of the minority farmer. Often it is alleged that the person was a friend or relative of one of [the USDA's Farm Service Administration] county officials."

The Mandans are members of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, also known as Three Affiliated Tribes. The couple still resides on land that was allocated by the Dawes General Allotment Act of 1887, which aimed at settling Native American tribes and turning them into farmers and ranchers.

A lot of us just have the bare land with fences. Many of us don't even have buildings.

--Claryca Mandan, plaintiff in the class-action suit
 Mandan, who now works as a Native American credit outreach counselor, said she and her family struggled without access to affordable credit. After she failed to secure a USDA loan, the Mandans raised four children in a two-bedroom mobile home for 12 years. Without proper loans, she said, she couldn't afford a larger home. It wasn't until 2007 that she moved her family into what she felt was adequate housing, purchased through a local housing authority.

Ultimately, Mandan said, they won't be able to hand down working farms to their children.

"We aren't able to pass on farms with buildings and irrigation. A lot of us just have the bare land with fences. Many of us don't even have buildings," she said. "Many of us just finally achieved standard housing. For this to be happening in the U.S. today, with an agency that was supposed to fund us equally, is just wrong."

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a recent statement to CNN that the USDA is "committed to resolving allegations of past discrimination because we are intent on ensuring every farmer and rancher is treated equally and fairly. We have made significant progress on addressing USDA's civil rights record to close this chapter in the department's history."

USDA officials told CNN that they are in settlement discussions with Native American farmers and that they are putting the final touches on a plan that would turn the page on the discrimination claims by Hispanic and women farmers, as well.

"We want to put this behind us and focus on the future," a USDA official said. "We want to make sure we have a strong foundation moving forward."

I support him, I encourage him, I tell him it's not the end of the world and something good should come out of this.

--Marilyn Keepseagle, wife of lawsuit plaintiff
 RELATED TOPICS
Native American Issues
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Agriculture Policy
Farmers such as George Keepseagle, for whom the case is named, have seen the years pass since the lawsuit was filed. In the 12 years that he and his wife, Marilyn, have been plaintiffs in the case, his health has deteriorated significantly because of stress, he said. Keepseagle, who is 70, was forced to sell his farm years ago. The couple now lives on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota and said they want to change the way the USDA services loans to minority communities. They said they are optimistic, but Marilyn admits that George has misgivings.

"He worries a lot. He worries more than I do," she said. "I support him, I encourage him, I tell him it's not the end of the world and something good should come out of this."

For Porter Holder, the lawsuit isn't about the money; it's about the future for his four young daughters.

"I hope to see fairness in Oklahoma," he said. "I hope to see that it doesn't matter, the color of your skin, or nationality, if you're trying to make a productive living. This goes back to 1700; some things just don't change -- it's time."


http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/07/09/native.american.farmers/index.html
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 12, 2010, 02:40:17 PM
Rocky Boy reservation will get some help:
The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release July 10, 2010
President Obama Signs Montana Disaster Declaration
The President today declared a major disaster exists in the State of Montana and ordered Federal aid to supplement State and local recovery efforts in the area struck by severe storms and flooding beginning on June 15, 2010, and continuing.

Federal funding is available to State and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storms and flooding in Hill County and the Rocky Boy
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 14, 2010, 01:59:12 PM
Turn the volume down a bit before you play this one. Wow these boys are loud.

Cree Confederation NLC Pow wow 2010
redwolfboy

Prince Albert Pow wow,

Cree Confederation NLC Pow wow 2010 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg8-B5-n5Sw#ws)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 21, 2010, 10:49:18 AM
http://www.romanticlovesecrets.com/images-nativeamerican.jpg (http://www.romanticlovesecrets.com/images-nativeamerican.jpg)

(http://www.vintagepostcards.org/auctions/joseph-nez-perce-native-american-indian-chief.jpg)

Native American Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce Nation

"Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired. My heart is sick and sad.
From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever."

Native American Quotes
A collection of Native American quotes;
inspirational words of great Indian wisdom

Traditional people of Indian nations have interpreted the two roads that face the light-skinned race as the road to technology and the road to spirituality. We feel that the road to technology.... has led modern society to a damaged and seared earth. Could it be that the road to technology represents a rush to destruction, and that the road to spirituality represents the slower path that the traditional native people have traveled and are now seeking again? The earth is not scorched on this trail. The grass is still growing there.
William Commanda, Mamiwinini, Canada, 1991

It is better to return a borrowed pot with a little something you last cooked in it.
Native American Proverb


If the white man wants to live in peace with the Indian, he can live in peace. Treat all men alike. Give them all the same law. Give them all an even chance to live and grow. All men were made by the same Great Spirit Chief. They are all brothers. The Earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it. Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to think and talk and act for myself, and I will obey every law, or submit to the penalty." - Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perce Native American Tribe


We are now about to take our leave and kind farewell to our native land, the country the Great Spirit gave our Fathers, we are on the eve of leaving that country that gave us birth, it is with sorrow we are forced by the white man to quit the scenes of our childhood... we bid farewell to it and all we hold dear.
- Quotes by Charles Hicks, Tsalagi Cherokee Vice Chief
speaking of The Trail of Tears, Nov. 4, 1838


The Great Spirit Chief who rules above all will smile upon this land... and this time the Indian race is waiting and praying. - Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perces


Do not judge your neighbor until you walk two moons in his moccasins.
- Native American Proverb


An Indian respects a brave man, but he despises a coward.
- Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perces Tribe


Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I may not remember. Involve me and I'll understand.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 30, 2010, 10:51:43 AM
POW WOW TV

http://tv.powwows.com/video/3979/Northern-Traditional--2010-Gathering-of-Nations (http://tv.powwows.com/video/3979/Northern-Traditional--2010-Gathering-of-Nations)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 27, 2010, 01:27:04 PM
This site provided by: Member BajaSusan on October 23, 2010, 12:06:03 pm
Thank You, Susan,
Yowbarb

Natural Herbal Remedies
http://www.manataka.org (http://www.manataka.org)
...
For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka® (Place of Peace). Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life.

Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka® and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, two American Presidents, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting "Story of Manataka".

The Manataka America Indian Council® exists to preserve and protect this sacred place. Welcome to our village! Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you

http://www.manataka.org/Contents%20Page.html (http://www.manataka.org/Contents%20Page.html)   Manataka Feature Index

...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 19, 2010, 07:08:03 AM
I started a New Topic:  Native American guidance for the coming times,               
                                     http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,1311.0.html
The Hopi Spiritual Survival Ark is also being posted  in this Native American Topic.

– Yowbarb
...    
http://www.disclose.tv/forum/the-hopi-spiritual-ark-survival-guide-t7514.html
    
Disclose TV forum, The Hopi Spiritual Ark Survival Guide

Native American Spirituality
THE HOPI SPIRITUAL ARK

Teachings that will protect us during the coming times...
The prophecies, instructions and warnings given to us over 1,100 years ago by

Maasaw can be viewed as a "Spiritual Ark" in these troubling times. The
Spiritual Ark that consists of carefully chosen thoughts, words, deeds and
promises. The sharing and existence of this Ark, is what makes the giving of the
prophecies understandable, and elevates the Hopi prophecies to equal, or
possibly superior, standing with the rest of the prophetic field of information
at this time.

Maasaw told the Hopi to be alert and watchful, and he named specific things they
should do to protect themselves. As we consider these wise specifics, we will
see that they are cautions that we should exercise too.

Make Careful Choices:"

Make careful Choices: When new opportunities are introduced and new advantages
come, be cautious and accept the least harmful things. Choose which path you
will follow -- the materialistic way or the Creator's way. Do not get careless
as time passes and forget your vows to the Creator and the spiritual laws. If
you do, it will be a sign you have forsaken the Great Creator."

Avoid Temptation:

Do not be tempted into anything that will harm your way of life, get you into
trouble, or produce problems. Even though temptation is evil, desire is strong
within us and hard to control. As we pass into the worlds of different ideas,
temptation will weaken us. Avoiding temptation is a key to survival. If you
cannot escape new changes, use them wisely. Don't let them destroy the valuable
elements in your life."

Avoid Pitfalls:

We often step into these very traps because we think they will improve our
lives. On the contrary, they can drain our mind and strength. Deceit is common
among world leaders. Advantageous lifestyles often lead us astray. Modern
concepts will not help balance the natural order on earth and in the universe.

Listen To Your Elders:

Listen to your elders, and you will learn that Divine laws and religion are
important. At one time Hopi learned wisdom, knowledge, and prophecy through
their elders in order to live wisely. It is a pity in these changing times, that
they hear no more, see nor more, nor do they understand. Yet these wise
teachings are the key to happiness and health.

Be Self-Sufficient:

Be Self-sufficient so that you are not dependent upon others for survival. Don't
rely on supermarkets for food and don't be entirely dependent on wages. What
will happen to you if some day the White man's world collapses?

Prepare In Advance:

Take time to review what has happened to you and try to predict what might
happen during the coming year. Once you have done this, ask yourself how you
will handle each thing that does occur. The ancient Native Americans followed a
ritual calendar that forced them to think ahead and prepare in advance, so that
they would not be caught unprepared. Pray for guidance to the Creator, Maasaw,
Mother Earth, and other helper deities.

Use Ancient Teachings As A Guideline:

We look upon our ancient teachings as a guideline used in order to avoid a
downfall for our mistakes. We have learned that through our conduct we can
accomplish good and bad deeds. The old ones say that we have gone through at
least three world catastrophes and each world was destroyed by the same error in
man.

Protect The Laws Of Nature And Spirit. Respect All Living Things:

We must carry on our purpose to protect the laws of nature and spirit which is
our highest priority. Other think that what they're doing is harmless. We think
they are destroying the link between Nature and Man. The signs of warning are
evident in many parts of the world. We all are to be blamed, for we are abusing
our Mother Earth by our mindless actions and by our irresistible urge to better
our way through our own inventive thinking. We have forsaken the warnings of our
ancient fathers, gradually leading ourselves to ruin. We all should hang our
heads in shame.
What we say will pain most people, but we hope it will help them to understand
themselves and reverse their ways toward better behavior for the good of lesser
man and for the survival of our world for the coming generations. We have
learned and believe that one cannot communicate with Nature unless your
existence and behavior are in harmony with the will of the Great Spirit, that he
who knows his heart will also find his way in the future.

Don't Try To Control Others:

Trading blame drains our planet of spiritual energy and causes great harm to all
land and life. Don't try to control others. The spirit dwells within all of us.

Be Satisfied With The Pattern Of Life Given To Us By Our Great Creator:

Be satisfied with the order of our Great Creator, whose light does not blind us
and does not lead us into confusion. Instead, His light brightens the road, so
that we can absorb its great wisdom and live like humans... Perhaps there is
still time for this land to live on under the laws of our Great Spirit and our
Great Creator. These are the things we desire. We are very sad for our life of
today; it is heading down the direction you have created for us.

The tide is gathering, and the high tide which sweeps us away may not be far off.
Our prophecies foretell that times will come when we will periodically recover
our senses and find that some vital element is amiss. Then we will retrace our
steps with fear, not bearing to look back and where we have been. So we will go
forward, backward, forward and backward, our decisions uncertain. This is
happening today in Hopi land, as it is happening in the rest of the world.
So time passes on, and the prophecies of our ancient people begin to unfold.

Many great events lie before us, and we are witnessing with astonishment today
the fact that our ancient's words were right. Live long, for there are great and
exciting adventures awaiting us.

© Reproductions Permitted


HOPI SURVIVAL GUIDE

Blend With The Land And Celebrate Life

Only through peace is the survival of mankind and our planet Earth possible...
At time's end ... there will be a new dawn of time when the world will bloom
into peacefulness.

1. As you board the Ark, make your own Covenant with the Creator and Maasaw.

That does not mean you will exchange what you are going to do on the Ark for
your own religious faith. While the Ark does function in a relationship with the
Creator, it is not a place of specific religion, nor does it recognize any
religion as superior to others. You do not even need to have a specific
religion, believing in a Divine Creator is enough! This message now is not about
eternal matters, or the afterlife, it is about one thing, SURVIVAL.

2. Live simply, as Maasaw himself lives and don't let materialism control your
life.

3. Practice self-denial.

4. Practice self-sufficiency.  

Each of us should possess whatever margin of
preparation we need to get us over humps that may last for long periods of time.
We who live in cities must ask ourselves what we would do if all of our food
supply sources closed down tomorrow. Practicing this is something the
Traditionalist Hopi do as a natural way of life, and it is one of the strategies
that has enabled them to endure for thousands of years. Having learned from long
experience that circumstances can change drastically from one year to the next,
they lay aside enough food each Fall to get them through the next year. If the
worse happens, they are ready. We too are advised to stock our shelves with
enough non-perishable foods to sustain our families when the prophesied emergencies strike.

5. Change your priorities. Make careful choices.

6. Recognize that it is the Creator's wish to rescue us, and that together with
the Hopi we can rescue the world.

7. Think of attitude as being an equal partner of application. What you think
about what you do may be even more important than what you do.

8. Make your attitude regarding life and the environment a reverent one.

9. Throughout the Ceremonial Cycle there will be dancing in the Ark.
This pursuit we are following has a serious nature, but we know it will be
successful. This awareness keeps us in a state of joy and fulfillment.

10. During the first part of December say prayers for the well being of the
entire world.
What is being done during this season is to prepare the atmosphere
for the coming year. During this period, you will be blending with the world,
and your consciousness of this state will enfold you and affect everything else
you do during the coming year. If people all over the
world are doing this, think of what the effect will be.

11. On December 21, do initiations to bring others aboard the Spiritual Ark:
 http://www.thehopiway.com/content/spiriir_ark.htm

© Reproductions Permitted
http://www.thehopiway.com/content/proph ... rvival.htm

http://www.thehopiway.com/?404=Y    The Hopi Way

...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 19, 2010, 08:47:14 AM

Grand Entry 2010 United Tribes Powwow! Saturday Afternoon   15:00
SiouxSavage
September 14, 2010 | Grand Entry 2010 United Tribes Powwow Saturday Afternoon

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqOEYyELDQ4


...
Native American POW WOW's coolmerc3      11:15

August 21, 2010 | 1 likes, 0 dislikes
Pictures of Native Americans Celebrating their Culture and Legacy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxt1wA5MjV0

...


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 19, 2010, 08:54:53 AM
The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa are an Ojibwa Native American tribe, with an Indian reservation lying
mostly in the Town of Lac du Flambeau in south-western Vilas County, and in the Town of Sherman in south-eastern Iron County
in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ....Lac du Flambeau Indian Reservation....
Located at Waaswaagani-zaaga'igan and translated into French as Lac du Flambeau (Torch Lake...)
The Reservation of the Lac du Flambeau Band, called Waaswaaganing in Ojibwe, was established under the Treaty of 1854.
...2000 census resident population of 2,995 persons...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac_du_Flambeau_Band_of_Lake_Superior_Chippewa
...
What wonderful, exuberant energy in this Pow Wow video.  Short but sweet.
I hope these people will be OK in the coming times. - Yowbarb

Bear River Pow Wow, Lac du Flambeau WI (7/9/10)    0:39

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqphlJnwoTc

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 22, 2010, 10:35:34 AM
Indian Taco mydneuknat   0:21

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmHWawSiTQs
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 22, 2010, 02:54:43 PM
Girl's Rite of Passage National Geographic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B3Abpv0ysM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 30, 2010, 10:40:33 AM
Published on Daily Yonder (http://www.dailyyonder.com)
http://www.dailyyonder.com/print/3004
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First, Always, Hold on to the Land

Image: Lakota elder Leola One Feather:

(http://www.dailyyonder.com/files/imagefield/lakotalandonefeather530.jpg) 

The need for better housing is dire for some Native Americans, but for many people, like Leola One Feather, keeping ownership of long-contested land remains the first priority.

by Nat Kramer

Lakota elder Leola One Feather stands on the future site of her eco-dome house near Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation.  Although too late in the season to make much progress now, she hopes to complete the house by next winter.

In June 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court awarded the Lakota Nation $106 million for 7.3 million acres surrounding the sacred Black Hills.

The Lakotas refused the money, saying, “The land is not for sale.”

Through decades of often violent confrontation that reopened vast tracts to non-Indian settlers for pennies on the dollar and forced the tribes onto reservations, the Lakota case would have been the largest settlement for lands taken by the U.S. government. Despite the Court’s decision, which still stands, the people of Rosebud, Pine Ridge and other Lakota communities have seen neither money nor land returned. Instead, the land is divided, as are the people.

Leola One Feather’s relatives were among those who chose the land and the future ostensibly guaranteed by treaties. She is now trying to create that future by building a home for her family from the hard soil. The past is ever present to her.

“I think if my grandfather was here, I think he’d be real proud of me because I speak the language, and I live on this land; but I really feel that’s the strength of being who I am, and nobody can tell me different because they made me really strong – those historical facts: how hard our people fought to keep their land.”
 
It’s important to her that she build this house on her own without funds from Housing and Urban Development or other federal aid.  Experience has taught her that those kinds of houses come with their own price and no guarantee of a better life.

“They put us in the same kind of blueprint houses in a cluster with a little-bitty yard. We’re almost Americans because they do that to us, but we’re not,” she explained. “When we’ve had presidents come here, like when President Clinton came to Pine Ridge, [HUD] just refurbished all those houses on the outside so they looked all right. They looked all spic-and-span, but on the inside, that’s another story.”

Jamie Folsom 
For those who want to live on their own land, used and often dilapidated mobile homes have been one of the few affordable options.

(http://www.dailyyonder.com/files/imagefield/lakotalandtrailer530.jpg)

Instead, One Feather lives in a used trailer on family lands away from central tribal housing in Wounded Knee. The trailer becomes less livable each year, and it’s clearly past time for a change. “They’re very hard to heat, and the floors are so cold and drafty that you have to have multiple layers of clothes on to survive here,” she said. “It would actually be easier for us at this point to live in a tent.”

One Feather spent much of her childhood in a tent, after the family cabin gave way to weather and regular shifts in the earth, a common issue in the fault zone of the western Dakotas.

Now she is ready to put in sweat equity and materials on a self-sustaining earthen house – an eco-dome – with help from Colorado-based nonprofit Tiospaye-Winyan Maka [3]. One Feather will be using some of the wood from the homestead, which hides among sunflowers and old appliances next to her trailer. It’s more of a practical consideration than sentimental, as aged wood is not easy to come by in a community that lies 100 miles from the nearest supply store.

The short building season is quickly giving way to the icy winds of another Dakota winter in her threadbare trailer. But she’s using the time to put her thoughts toward the future.

“What I always imagine, in my earth house, that one day I’m going to sit in a circle with all my kids and all my grandchildren, and I’m going to have a ceremony, and I’m going to thank God that I have land that my grandparents gave me.”

Jamie Folsom is an independent, multimedia journalist who covers rural life, science and First Nations issues. Videographer Nat Kramer contributed to this series. They are currently developing a set of in-depth multimedia stories on eco-housing projects in Indian Country. Contact for syndication: JamieFNews@yahoo.com.

The need for better housing is dire for some Native Americans, but for many people, like Leola One Feather, keeping ownership of long-contested land remains the first priority.

By Jamie Folsom
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2011, 11:05:09 AM
http://www.powwows.com/

Your Portal to Native American Tribal CulturePow Wow is the Native American people’s way of meeting together, to join in dancing, singing, visiting, renewing old friendships and make new ones. This is a time to renew the culture and preserve a rich heritage of American Indians.
Welcome to PowWows.com, your portal to this rich culture. PowWows.com feature information and resources that allow you to explore the Native American life, culture and history.
What is a Native American Pow Wow?
Directory of American Indian Tribes
List of Native American Colleges
Native American Jobs
Research Native American Information

...
New Year `s Eve Pow Wow 2011, Albany NY   5:43     291 views 
kalitanata

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmbR0Xh2wOc

Pow wow display 2010-2011    1:21    136 Views
IamMohawk
IamMohawk | January 02, 2011 | Just a quick look at my display at our pow wow at the Crown Plaza in Albany NY New Years Eve celebration. Healing winds has brought our people together at this great event and as always I thank you!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7p0xbH-12Y

Nespelem New Years Powwow 2010-2011, Grand Entry
PowwowTime | January 03, 2011 | Nespelem New Years Powwow. Grand Entry. Visit www.powwowtime.com for powwow calendar, forum, gallery, business directory and more!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiD88T69W9w

Yowbarb Note: Turn the volume way down before U click on this video! Loud.   ;D

Red Lake New year pow wow 2010-2011 womens special  3:00
SchleyFam1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmlvlK_Hv30
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2011, 11:24:49 AM
Some New Year's Eve Pow Wows.

Almost Midnight 49 at Tulsa NYE 2010.MOV    2:53
ab49queen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0HXNmYZQVI


Copan Powwow 2010 11     8:00
robbpaul2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGaCrIx__zw

Yowbarb Note:  This Pow Wow was in Alabama. I think Blakeland is near Littleton, Colorado.
Not sure yet...

BLAKELAND NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW 2010.wmv   2:47
SHERRICK63
January 01, 2011 | NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW 2010 POARCH,AL
BLAKELAND WINS 2ND PLACE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cA49R0_DqM

...



Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2011, 04:39:23 PM
http://www.awarenessmag.com/julaug08/ja08_for_native_americans.htm

For Native Americans ...
Domes Blend Their Ancestral Past with the Modern World
By Carol Lanham

Deep in the Grand Canyon, in a remote area accessible only on foot, by horseback or by helicopter, a dream is taking shape among members of the Havasupai tribe who inhabit the land. It is a dream for a better way of life, in harmony with their ancestral past yet in step with the realities of the modern world.

It is a dream that began with Uqualla, a Havasupai tribal chief and medicine man, but soon came to involve others throughout the United States. The dream has a name — the Jeva Project — and a purpose —  to bring round, sustainable housing not only to the Havasu Canyon but to other Native American communities as well.

The Jeva Project, named for the Havasupai word for healing, involves building Monolithic Domes to replace aging and cramped housing on native lands. Made of steel-reinforced, insulated concrete, the domes offer a number of advantages over traditional buildings.

“The true ceremonial shape is the round circle, symbolic of Mother Earth, Father Sun, Sister Moon, and one’s life circle,” says Uqualla, who not only is spearheading the Jeva Project but also travels the world in his work as a medicine man. “Our ancestors knew this as evidenced by their round floor plans that were continuous with no beginning or end.”

The dome homes offer practical advantages as well. Due to the materials used in their construction, they are permanent structures designed to last for centuries and offer protection against severe weather. They also are energy efficient, costing 50 percent less to heat and cool than traditional buildings of the same size.
Perhaps most importantly for Native Americans in remote areas, locals can be easily trained to build the domes and most of the construction materials can be dropped in by helicopter if necessary, making them a cost-effective alternative to traditional housing.

“The hope is by showcasing several of these dwellings in the beauty of the Havasu Canyon area, other tribal nations could see the benefits of this housing technology that incorporates the original dwelling concept of the ancients for use in the modern world,” according to the mission statement posted on the project’s website.

Rick Crandall, a Mesa-based architect who designed the five domes that will be constructed in the Jeva Project’s first phase, says the buildings are in keeping with the traditions of several Native American tribes. “Many of the Arizona and New Mexico tribes consider circles to be a sacred shape, and this is especially true of Pueblo, Tewa, Anastasi, Hopi and Navajo tribes.

Round buildings aren’t new and indeed were part of the basic culture of the American Plains natives going back for many centuries,” he says. “It was only when the westward expansion began in the 1840s that square buildings were introduced to these tribes and all of the square buildings were constructed for them.”

Monolithic Domes planned for the Havasu Canyon would not be the first to be built for Native Americans. Several dome schools have been built on Indian reservations throughout the state of Arizona, as well as in New Mexico and South Dakota. In Oklahoma, plans are currently under way for a multipurpose Monolithic Dome building to be used by the Muskogee Indians.

Monolithic Domes were invented in 1978 by three Idaho natives who believed that nature’s perfect shape offered a better way to build. David B. South had become fascinated with domes after hearing a lecture on geodesic domes by their inventor, Buckminster Fuller.

But South thought he could build a dome more efficiently. After much experimentation, he and his brothers, Barry and Randy, came up with a way to build a one-piece, concrete structure that today is known as a Monolithic Dome.

The building process begins with the placement of a ringbeam footing and the pouring of a circular steel-reinforced concrete slab floor. An Airform, a tarp made of tough, single-ply roofing material, is then attached to the ring base and inflated. Once the Airform is inflated, work moves to the interior where three inches of polyurethane foam is sprayed on the structure.

A grid of steel rebar is then placed into the foam and later embedded in Shotcrete that ranges from 4 inches at the top to 8 inches at the base. This process creates a safe, permanent and energy-efficient structure.

In the three decades since their invention, Monolithic Domes have been built all over the United States and around the world. They are being used as homes, schools, churches, storage facilities, gymnasiums and performing arts centers. The Navajo Nation was the first Native American tribe to build a Monolithic Dome.

In 1996, a school district on a Navajo reservation in Arizona commissioned Crandall to design two Monolithic Dome school buildings largely because of the relatively low construction costs and energy efficiency, but also because the buildings’ shape would be in keeping with the tribe’s sacred traditions.

Leupp School, with students in grades kindergarten through 12, completed its Monolithic Dome library and parent center in August 1997. The building, located in Leupp, Arizona, is also available to the community for town meetings and social get-togethers.

In nearby Birdsprings, Little Singer Community School completed a multipurpose dome building a few months later. The dome includes a gym, complete with a basketball court and jogging track, as well as classrooms.

To make the building compatible with sacred traditions, four entrances were incorporated into the dome, one for each direction. In addition, each entrance features three designs symbolizing the full circle of life. That totals 12 — an important number in Navaho cosmology.

Ron White, who was assistant superintendent of Tolchii Kooh Charter Schools, which was in charge of building both schools, said the domes have met expectations for durability and energy efficiency. But he pointed out that the idea initially met with some resistance simply because the domes were so different from the traditional buildings that were part of the modern-day reservation. “We learned that trying to make changes in the building mindset is difficult to do,” he says.

School officials in Whiteriver, Arizona also encountered some skepticism when they recommended construction of a Monolithic Dome elementary school on the Apache Reservation. Although the Apaches traditionally built wickiups — wood and grass structures shaped like a tepee with a smoke hole at the top — they now live in traditional, square buildings.

By making the dome designs and plans available to the community, providing tribal members with information, and welcoming spectators at the construction site, the doubts were soon eliminated. In 1998, the three domes that make up Cradleboard Elementary opened to rave reviews.

Soon, there will be Monolithic Dome homes on a reservation as well. The first dome housing community is slated for completion this summer on the Navajo Reservation in Taloni Lake, Arizona.
Built by Dome Technology of Idaho, 36 concrete dome shells are completed, but work still needs to be done on the interiors of these new homes. “It is believed that with reasonable care, these buildings will stand long after other housing projects have gone the way of the world,” White says.

Meanwhile, construction on homes for the Havasupai tribe has been temporarily delayed due to the unexpected death in April of Archie Eschborn, who along with Uqualla, was spearheading plans for the Jeva Project. It was Eschborn who first came up with the idea for building Monolithic Domes in the Havasu Canyon after getting to know Mason Rumney, a long-time dome owner in Sedona.

Upon meeting Uqualla, Eschborn realized they both had a similar vision for the Havasupai tribe and they became actively involved in securing financing necessary to make their dream a reality.
Before his death, Eschborn was working with several U.S government organizations, including the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Department of the Interior, among others.

Eschborn’s widow, Linnea, along with Uqualla, Crandall and Rumney remain committed to making the project a reality. Uqualla, who teaches globally, is already making plans to host medicine meetings in the Jeva Project’s ceremonial complex once it is completed.

“I know that the Jeva Project is now up to me, and Archie’s wife, Linnea. We’ve been given the talking stick, and take the responsibility of carrying the project through. My hope is to have the Havasupai tribe be the leading force in the return to tribal traditions.”

For more information on the Jeva Project, visit www.jevaproject.com. For more information about Monolithic Domes, please visit www.monolithic.com, www.uqualla.com, or call Mason Rumney at (928) 300-7352.

 


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Return to the July/August Index page




 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 11, 2011, 11:31:37 AM
I just started reading this book called, Now is the Hour, written by a Native American, (can't remember her name), but it seems to be very cool and even has a section about how much stuff to have stocked up, and other survival tips.  I think it will be a great asset to have.

That sounds great! I will take a look at it.  ;)
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: jdeesmith55 on January 24, 2011, 08:33:24 AM
Thanks for all of these posts Yowbarb. ALot of good information from these tribes (and many others) have had great information, and ways of life that just got pushed away. These guys had it right
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 24, 2011, 11:13:46 AM
Thanks for all of these posts Yowbarb. ALot of good information from these tribes (and many others) have had great information, and ways of life that just
got pushed away. These guys had it right

Glad to do what I can to help put these valuable ideas here...
A lot of it was fairly new to me, too.
All cultures have something to contribute, 4 sure.
There are concepts I really like in the Buddhist cultures and in the Native American and there
are overlaps... one idea I like is  for the "Allmighty" to be a "Grandfather." - Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 12, 2011, 11:30:29 AM

This isn't the latest update, no doubt, just found this...
Yowbarb

Native News Update January 29, 2010    7:51  2,490 Views

skabewis

VIDEO:  http://youtu.be/48T64zqznkM

http://www.weather.com/outlook/weather-news/news/articles/nd-flooding-slideshow-041111_2011-04-11?page=7 

......................................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 15, 2011, 11:28:49 AM
http://www.nativetimes.com/  Native Times

Native Americans To Occupy Sacred Land at Glen Cove in Vallejo

Written by Sacred Site Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes Thursday, 14 April 2011 15:03

Spiritual Ceremony and Occupation Beginning Friday, April 15, 2011 at 8 am

Vallejo, California (April 14, 2011) – Faced with the imminent arrival of bulldozers at the Native American sacred burial site at Glen Cove, Vallejo, members of the local Native American community will hold a religious ceremony to commence an occupation of Sogorea Te, otherwise known as Glen Cove, in the City of Vallejo beginning at 8 am on Friday, April 15, 2011. Native Americans and their supporters have vowed to physically block bulldozers or any other work that would desecrate the burial site.

Native American activists consider this to be the last stand in a struggle that has been going on for over a decade, since the Greater Vallejo Recreation District (GVRD) first proposed plans for a “fully featured public park” including construction of a paved parking lot, paved hiking trails, 1000 pound picnic tables and a public restroom on top of the 3500 year old burial site.

On Wednesday, April 13th, Sacred Site Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes (SSP&RIT), a Vallejo-based community organization, filed an administrative civil rights complaint to the State of California alleging that the City and GVRD are discriminating on the basis of race in threatening to destroy and desecrate significant parts of the Glen Cove Shellmound and burial site, for harming Native Americans’ religious and spiritual well-being, and effectively excluding Native Americans from their right to full participation in decision-making regarding the site.

The history and cultural value of the site has never been disputed. Human remains have been consistently unearthed as the area around the site has been developed.  Native Americans continue to hold ceremonies at Sogorea Te just as they have for thousands of years. The Glen Cove Shell Mound spans fifteen acres along the Carquinez Strait.  It is the final resting place of many Indigenous People dating back more than 3,500 years, and has served as a traditional meeting place for dozens of California Indian tribes.  The site continues to be spiritually important to California tribes. The Glen Cove site is acknowledged by GVRD and the City to have many burials and to be an important cultural site, yet they are moving forward as early as Friday with plans to build a toilet and parking lot on this sacred site and to grade a hill that likely contains human remains and important cultural artifacts.

SSP&RIT have asked GVRD to reconsider their plans to grade the hill and build toilets and a parking lot at the site.

Glen Cove is located near the intersection of South Regatta and Whitesides Drive in Vallejo.

For more information and directions: www.protectglencove.org

(http://protectglencove.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/tempheader.jpg)

http://protectglencove.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/tempheader.jpg
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 21, 2011, 09:02:33 AM
A few Arizona Powwows, Yowbarb
...
Pow Wow           3:54 624,797 Views

Uploaded by citizenbfk on May 6, 2006

Native American Indian Dancing
@ Northeast Arizona, on White Mountian
Apache land.

http://youtu.be/3s9z3IOpH1g

...

page arizona 08 powwow, men's grass dance specials    3:20  2,422 Views

Uploaded by lryical444 on May 6, 2008

jude's special. i don't know what number of song it is. i think it's the second.

http://youtu.be/63bfFVpvPI8

...

Eagle Creek - Intertribal @ Flagstaff HS Powwow 2008   2:50  4,817

Uploaded by DR3WTUB3 on Feb 20, 2008
Eagle Creek, Intertribal @ Flagstaff HS Powwow 2008

http://youtu.be/PBue1OH5RYo

...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 21, 2011, 09:18:47 AM
I suppose there will another one of these presentations this summer (Museum of Northern Arizona.) - Yowbarb

77th Annual Hopi Festival of Arts and Culture at the Museum of Northern Arizona July 2010   0:30 1,216 Views

http://youtu.be/huzFM9R33Kk
Uploaded by KUYIHopiRadio on Jun 30, 2010

(Flagstaff, AZ)—The 77th Annual Hopi Festival of Arts and Culture returns on the July Fourth weekend to the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, bringing 75 of the top Hopi artists and demonstrators, seasoned performers of music and dance, and speakers who will talk about Hopi beliefs and current issues. Saturday, July 3 and Sunday, July 4 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Museum will be brimming with all things Hopi
 
...
Buc Wild @ Snow Mountain powwow 3:41  733 views

Uploaded by Sapa1992 on Jul 10, 2009

1st place winners, this is their final song for the night

http://youtu.be/YDFURmYy5fw
...

Native American : Navajo Hoop Dance    2:20  9,138

chetalli
Uploaded by chetalli on Nov 7, 2008

http://youtu.be/f6MWVh_hQyE

Navajo (sometimes spelled Navaho), or Dine' , (means The People in Navajo) refers or relates to the Navajo people, currently the second largest Federally recognized Native American tribe in the United States, with 298,197 people claiming to be full or partial Navajo, according to the 2000 U.S. census.The DinÃ's traditional boundaries are the four sacred mountains, which actually include an area much larger than the present-day reservation. The boundaries of the Nation itself are the Ute Mountain Ute Indian Reservation at the Four Corners Monument and stretch across the Colorado Plateau into Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico.Long Walk of the Navajo: In 1863 and 1864, as the Anglo settlers' demand for land grew, the United States government forced more than 8,500 Navajo men, women and children to march in harsh winter conditions for hundreds of miles to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico (present-day Ft. Sumner) as part of President Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act. Some Navajos were able to escape and hide at Navajo Mountain, along the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers, and in the Grand Canyon. As the march went on, the Navajo were forced to leave their elderly and young children behind to die. Five months later, the Navajos arrived at Bosque Redondo. Many Navajos died at the wretched prison camp, due to poor living conditions. The Navajos were imprisoned for about six years, and released in May 1868. Bosque Redondo had been proved as a miserable failure, because of poor planning, disease, crop infestation and generally poor conditions for agriculture.Navajo used drum and flutes during their Pow Wows. This shows an honor to their Gods.


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 21, 2011, 09:27:56 AM
Part 1. Part 2 is farther below, Yowbarb
...

The Trail of Tears as Told by Johnny Cash - pt 1   7:39   33,571 Views

Uploaded by jackogreene on Nov 10, 2008

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/qW8rIM2lNN8

Removal of the Cherokees
Birthday Story of Private John G. Burnett, Captain Abraham McClellan's Company, 2nd

Regiment, 2nd Brigade, Mounted Infantry, Cherokee Indian Removal, 1838-39.
Children:
This is my birthday, December 11, 1890, I am eighty years old today. I was born at Kings Iron Works in Sulllivan County, Tennessee, December the 11th, 1810. I grew into manhood fishing
in Beaver Creek and roaming through the forest hunting the deer and the wild boar and the
timber wolf. Often spending weeks at a time in the solitary wilderness with no companions but my rifle, hunting knife, and a small hatchet that I carried in my belt in all of my wilderness
wanderings.
On these long hunting trips I met and became acquainted with many of the Cherokee Indians,
hunting with them by day and sleeping around their camp fires by night. I learned to speak their language, and they taught me the arts of trailing and building traps and snares. On one of my
long hunts in the fall of 1829, I found a young Cherokee who had been shot by a roving band
of hunters and who had eluded his pursuers and concealed himself under a shelving rock.
Weak from loss of blood, the poor creature was unable to walk and almost famished for water. I carried him to a spring, bathed and bandaged the bullet wound, and built a shelter out of bark
peeled from a dead chestnut tree. I nursed and protected him feeding him on chestnuts and
toasted deer meat. When he was able to travel I accompanied him to the home of his people and remained so long that I was given up for lost. By this time I had become an expert rifleman and fairly good archer and a good trapper and spent most of my time in the forest in quest of game.
...
The Trail of Tears as Told by Johnny Cash - pt 2   7:38    20,257 Views
Uploaded by jackogreene on Nov 10, 2008

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/2RIJ_hFPDFE     

In the year 1828, a little Indian boy living on Ward creek had sold a gold nugget to a white
trader, and that nugget sealed the doom of the Cherokees. In a short time the country was
overrun with armed brigands claiming to be government agents, who paid no attention to the
rights of the Indians who were the legal possessors of the country. Crimes were committed that were a disgrace to civilization. Men were shot in cold blood, lands were confiscated. Homes
were burned and the inhabitants driven out by the gold-hungry brigands.
Chief Junaluska was personally acquainted with President Andrew Jackson. Junaluska had
taken 500 of the flower of his Cherokee scouts and helped Jackson to win the battle of the
Horse Shoe, leaving 33 of them dead on the field. And in that battle Junaluska had drove his
tomahawk through the skull of a Creek warrior, when the Creek had Jackson at his mercy.

Chief John Ross sent Junaluska as an envoy to plead with President Jackson for protection for
his people, but Jackson�s manner was cold and indifferent toward the rugged son of the
forest who had saved his life. He met Junaluska, heard his plea but curtly said, "Sir, your
audience is ended. There is nothing I can do for you." The doom of the Cherokee was sealed.
Washington, D.C., had decreed that they must be driven West and their lands given to the
white man, and in May 1838, an army of 4000 regulars, and 3000 volunteer soldiers under
command of General Winfield Scott, marched into the Indian country and wrote the blackest
chapter on the pages of American history.

Men working in the fields were arrested and driven to the stockades. Women were dragged
from their homes by soldiers whose language they could not understand. Children were often
separated from their parents and driven into the stockades with the sky for a blanket and the
earth for a pillow. And often the old and infirm were prodded with bayonets to hasten them to
the stockades.

In one home death had come during the night. A little sad-faced child had died and was lying
on a bear skin couch and some women were preparing the little body for burial. All were
arrested and driven out leaving the child in the cabin. I don�t know who buried the body.

In another home was a frail mother, apparently a widow and three small children, one just a
baby. When told that she must go, the mother gathered the children at her feet, prayed a
humble prayer in her native tongue, patted the old family dog on the head, told the faithful
creature good-by, with a baby strapped on her back and leading a child with each hand started on her exile. But the task was too great for that frail mother. A stroke of heart failure relieved her sufferings. She sunk and died with her baby on her back, and her other two children clinging to her hands.

Chief Junaluska who had saved President Jackson�s life at the battle of Horse Shoe
witnessed this scene, the tears gushing down his cheeks and lifting his cap he turned his face
toward the heavens and said, "Oh my God, if I had known at the battle of the Horse Shoe what I know now, American history would have been differently written."

At this time, 1890, we are too near the removal of the Cherokees for our young people to fully understand the enormity of the crime that was committed against a helpless race. Truth is, the facts are being concealed from the young people of today. School children of today do not
know that we are living on lands that were taken from a helpless race at the bayonet point to
satisfy the white man's greed.

Future generations will read and condemn the act and I do hope posterity will remember that
private soldiers like myself, and like the four Cherokees who were forced by General Scott to
shoot an Indian Chief and his children, had to execute the orders of our superiors. We had no
choice in the matter.

Twenty-five years after the removal it was my privilege to meet a large company of the
Cherokees in uniform of the Confederate Army under command of Colonel Thomas. They were encamped at Zollicoffer and I went to see them. Most of them were just boys at the time of the removal but they instantly recognized me as "the soldier that was good to us". Being able to talk to them in their native language I had an enjoyable day with them. From them I learned that Chief John Ross was still ruler in the nation in 1863. And I wonder if he is still living? He was a noble-hearted fellow and suffered a lot for his race.

...................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: inselemel on April 22, 2011, 11:22:25 AM
Yes, human history is extremely repugnant, and the victors wether it the empire building europeans from the last 00's of years or the Romans 000's of years ago (who generally are the bullies and murderers) always get to write history so it looks like they are in the right and the original settlers of the land's are the barbarians (us Celts get that too) if you try to defend your land.  All the killing, raping, pillaging and enslavement whether literally or to their ideas which for some unknown reason to me they think are superior to everyone elses, well i think it is payback time and all the oppressed peoples will live in a better world than we do now, the next dimension.

Iron Maiden - RUN TO THE HILLS

White man came across the sea
He brought us pain and misery
He killed our tribes, he killed our creed
He took our game for his own need

We fought him hard we fought him well
Out on the plains we gave him hell
But many came too much for Cree
Oh will we ever be set free?

Riding through dust clouds and barren wastes
Galloping hard on the plains
Chasing the redskins back to their holes
Fighting them at their own game
Murder for freedom a stab in the back
Women and children and cowards attack

Run to the hills, run for your lives
Run to the hills, run for your lives

Soldier blue in the barren wastes
Hunting and killing their game
Raping the women and wasting the men
The only good Indians are tame
Selling them whiskey and taking their gold
Enslaving the young and destroying the old

Run to the hills, run for your lives
   
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2011, 09:38:45 PM
Teen girls fancy-SGU-Founders day powwow 2011   1:46

Uploaded by rweddell1965 on Feb 7, 2011

Teen girls fancy shawlers gettin down on Sunday Feb.6,2011 at SGU-founders day pow-wow . 1st place-Olowan Win Bad Hand,2nd-Oskate win One Star, 3rd-Igni Win White, 4th-Taima Valandra. Awesome dancing ladies!! at Antelope, South Dakota - Katie Weddell on camera

http://youtu.be/lAFePNvvk0w
...
Womens Fancy Shawl @ Cal State Long Beach 2011  2:27

Uploaded by apach3boy on Mar 14, 2011

http://youtu.be/esKQ_FxobGA

............................................................................................
MSU FANCY SHAWL SPECIAL 2011   3:16

Uploaded by SkylarBallew15 on Feb 16, 2011

http://youtu.be/ugd-YwLLdFE
............................................................................................
Women's fancy Shawl 2011  2:18

http://youtu.be/iOU9Dvz1_30
..............................................................................................

Womens Fancy @ Red Mesa Pow wow 2011   3:01

Uploaded by lula18able on Mar 3, 2011
1st contest

http://youtu.be/j2cZatp2Lc8
.................................................................................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2011, 10:02:27 PM
 ;D   The sillier side of Pow Wow gatherings - Yowbarb
...
Very old tradition the men put on women's dresses and shawls and dance.  ;) - YB

Switch Dance Special- Men's

Uploaded by lilnicitempe on Jan 8, 2008

TOO FUNNY= Gotta Watch!!!
Ft. McDowell 2006

http://youtu.be/w0eLfJM2NSI
...
Now the women put on the mens' attire and dance. - YB

Switch Dance- Women's  2:33

http://youtu.be/-6dkn7Wlir8
...

(Just for the heck of it these youngsters threw in some hip hop. - Yowbarb)

Powwow Hip-Hop-Style  0:41

Uploaded by Nikkitra on Apr 23, 2006
Video taken of the winners of the Hip Hop contest on the Chickahominy Tribe in VA

http://youtu.be/erJx-vkFYqo

...

http://youtu.be/WiMQhgME8gM

...................................................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 04, 2011, 10:27:07 PM

Holy Hills Heart - Santee

arafel1964

http://youtu.be/2alHsom0qGc

................................................................................

Peaceful Journey - Santee (Nat.Am)

arafel1964

http://youtu.be/SA2IDO5yArk

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ASEEKERTOO on May 05, 2011, 06:53:37 AM
Just want to interject that a good source of Indian prophecy from a number of different tribes
can be found in this book:
'End of Days' by Sylvia Browne with Lindsay Harrison. First published 2008 by DUTTON and the
Penguin Group. ISBN 978-0-525-95067-7
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 05, 2011, 09:50:55 AM
Just want to interject that a good source of Indian prophecy from a number of different tribes
can be found in this book:
'End of Days' by Sylvia Browne with Lindsay Harrison. First published 2008 by DUTTON and the
Penguin Group. ISBN 978-0-525-95067-7

ASEEKERTOO this is great.
Also this info would be here: Native American Prophecy

http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=1439.msg16569
I just updated the title of my Topic so it will be easier to find, and "Set It Sticky,"
so it won't get lost.
Previous title of my Topic was: Tecumseh and other Native American Prophets
                             
                              New Title:  Native American Prophecy
- YB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 24, 2011, 10:23:20 PM
Bad Lands - South Dakota   5:53  11,146 Views

videosphere

http://youtu.be/JpyrQae9kNI
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 25, 2011, 06:24:02 AM

NYC Native American Heritage Celebration
Share · Public Event.

Cloud photos
by Priscilla Anacakuyani

Mobile Uploads
by Priscilla Anacakuyani

Time

 Friday, June 3 at 11:00am - June 5 at 7:00pm  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Location  Floyd Bennett Field    3159 Flatbush Avenue
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Created By
Redhawk Council
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
More Info
 
Enjoy Native American Singing, Dancing, Food, Crafts, Jewelry, Educational Programs and More!

$12 Adults, $7 Young Adults and Seniors
Free for Children 6 years and under

MC: Bill Crouse

Drums:
Host Northern Drum-Iron River
Host Southern Drum-Black Bear

June 3, 2011 10am-4pm Student Day (Open to School Groups and the General Public) $6 Admission

School groups must pre-register. Email or call for more information.

June 4-5, 2011 11am-7pm Grand Entry at 1pm and 5pm

Dancer Info
POINTS BEGIN ON SATURDAY

Dancer Contest Info
Adult 18+ (Traditional, Grass, Fancy, Jingle): 1st – $600, 2nd – $400, 3rd – $300, 4th – $200
Teen 13 -17 (Traditional, Grass, Fancy, Jingle): 1st – $250, 2nd – $200, 3rd – $100
Junior Boys / Girls 6 – 12 (Combined): 1st – $100, 2nd – $75, 3rd – $50
Tiny Tots

Trophy / Specials
$1000 Women’s Fancy Special
$500 Women’s Traditional Special (S & N combined)
$500 Men’s Southern Straight Special
$500 Men’s Grass Special (winner take all)
$1000 Men’s Northern Traditional Special

CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES INFO:
http://redhawkcouncil.org/championships/

Redhawk Native American Arts Council
(718) 686-9297
Email: redhawkarts@mindspring.com
URL: www.redhawkcouncil.org
Title: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 05, 2011, 10:13:27 PM
I hadn't seen this posted so here is the Hopi Nation website.

http://www.hopi-nsn.gov/
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 07, 2011, 07:07:21 PM
I have another official website to post. It's the Grandfather Martin Hopi Elder website. I started to read this bio on the man & about fell out of my chair when I read the part about bringing souvenirs from the moon. So here goes with this rabbit hole . Apollo was a hoax YES/NO ? Are there real deal rocks etc. from our moon here on earth brought back by modern man or machine. Please all you space guys help.

http://www.thedreammasters.org/hopi/martingashweseoma.php


Sidenote: Back in the day (late 70's) I dated a girl who's father was a 4 star general in the air force. She told me that "daddy" had moon rocks. Well  :o being the inquisitive one, the next time I spoke to "daddy" you know the question would be raised. Needless to say "daddy" never revealed the goods during my tenure.  8)

 
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 07, 2011, 07:24:51 PM
After more reading on Grandfather Martins page he state's language regarding disturbance to sacred Hopi land. Being in the mining field I had heard of Uranium deposits near the Grand Canyon & have heard debate whether or not to pursue this vein. I did some digging & come up with this tid-bit .....

http://cronkitenewsonline.com/2011/07/challenge-to-grand-canyon-mining-ban-clears-first-congressional-hurdle/

Doesn't this make you really question our gov't ancestry  ???
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: Lori on August 08, 2011, 02:43:08 AM
Hi Terry,

These are good sites.  About the moon rocks... :o ...

This is so interesting.

Thank you.
 :D
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 13, 2011, 03:09:34 PM
I've been looking at prophecy rock a lot recently. I believe the notion came to do this after Marshall gave a run through on last weeks show. Well my focus has been on the top level of the glyphs. The 3 humans + 1 human standing on a horizontal line that connects with a jagged line in ascension. The jagged line in ascension as I see it is the path for those that want to ascend to the 5th dimension of light. The jagged line represents a lighting bolt to me.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: errrv on August 13, 2011, 07:01:22 PM
Do the Hopi allow squatters on their land???  ;D
Erv
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 14, 2011, 05:46:52 AM
Erv, You may want to research Moenkopi Az. That's the Hopi's little town. The Hopi & the other tribes in this area are very laid back. I would call their bureau office prior to heading this way & let them know you are relocating for spiritual reasons. They'll give you all the info you need. I know when I want to go on Hualapai  (Wall-A-Pie) land, I just head over to the bureau office & have a nice chit chat with kind ladies . I may have to buy a permit (1 day) if I want to drive out towards the canyon on there land . Northern Az is either public trust land, national park or sovereign peoples land. When you get to north eastern Mohave County, there is private party land very close sovereign land. In my opinion that's our sweet spot. Again you can "claim" 20 ac for $16 from Mohave County Az. This gives you the right to explore for minerals on public land. Good luck...
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 17, 2011, 01:18:17 PM
This book was written in 1905 regarding Hopi Prophecy.... Enjoy  ;)

http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/hopi/toth/
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: augonit on August 17, 2011, 02:40:08 PM
I've been looking at prophecy rock a lot recently. I believe the notion came to do this after Marshall gave a run through on last weeks show. Well my focus has been on the top level of the glyphs. The 3 humans + 1 human standing on a horizontal line that connects with a jagged line in ascension. The jagged line in ascension as I see it is the path for those that want to ascend to the 5th dimension of light. The jagged line represents a lighting bolt to me.

I was looking at this and thought that the picture represents food/population.  It looks like a bowl beside the figure on the left.  The top has more people and no food represented, however towards the bottom are less figures with what looks like corn growing.  Maybe the message could also be keep the population under control or else the earth can't support it.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 18, 2011, 10:50:15 PM
I've been looking at prophecy rock a lot recently. I believe the notion came to do this after Marshall gave a run through on last weeks show. Well my focus has been on the top level of the glyphs. The 3 humans + 1 human standing on a horizontal line that connects with a jagged line in ascension. The jagged line in ascension as I see it is the path for those that want to ascend to the 5th dimension of light. The jagged line represents a lighting bolt to me.

I was looking at this and thought that the picture represents food/population.  It looks like a bowl beside the figure on the left.  The top has more people and no food represented, however towards the bottom are less figures with what looks like corn growing.  Maybe the message could also be keep the population under control or else the earth can't support it.
Well it's certainly a baffling pictogram
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 18, 2011, 10:57:29 PM
I've been looking at prophecy rock a lot recently. I believe the notion came to do this after Marshall gave a run through on last weeks show. Well my focus has been on the top level of the glyphs. The 3 humans + 1 human standing on a horizontal line that connects with a jagged line in ascension. The jagged line in ascension as I see it is the path for those that want to ascend to the 5th dimension of light. The jagged line represents a lighting bolt to me.

That swastika in the sun is Spiderwoman giving nourishment to the Creator of 2 worlds. The overworld & underworld. Hitler may have really gotten into Hopi lore & got punch drunk on Spiderwoman's creative powers. He was also highly fascinated with the inner earth legends mentioned in the Hopi Traditions book written in 1905, that I am currently reading.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: augonit on August 19, 2011, 06:49:45 AM
I know a lot about Hitler, and I've never heard any of that.  They were actually tickled when they found swastika symbols on ancient carvings when they went out looking for the Aryan race, and when they found these things they believed it was proof that the Aryans were the supreme rulers.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: errrv on August 19, 2011, 09:45:23 AM
There's another thread tracing the twelve tribes of Judah to the UK & Germany. The Aryan race came from Judah. Very interesting concept. Makes a lot of sense.
Erv
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 19, 2011, 03:24:16 PM
There's another thread tracing the twelve tribes of Judah to the UK & Germany. The Aryan race came from Judah. Very interesting concept. Makes a lot of sense.
Erv


All those tribes are derived back to the 4 ages described in the 1905 book posted above.
This book was transcribed from Hopi Elders verbal wisdom of the ages 100 yrs+ ago to the author UNDILUTED to us. Please take the time & read this precious work .....
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 21, 2011, 05:30:30 AM
The heart & lungs zone of the Earth Mother described in the grand canyon story I posted seems to have a gold circle around it from all the old abandoned mines page I posted from the BLM.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: errrv on August 21, 2011, 10:08:41 AM
I'm about 4 chapters into the book. Very interesting stuff!
Erv
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 21, 2011, 12:52:29 PM
I'm about 4 chapters into the book. Very interesting stuff!
Erv

Thanks Erv for reading this treasure. From the Elders lips to the authors ears.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: Sunnybug on August 21, 2011, 01:11:20 PM
I've just finished the link to the page about the Grand Canyon - trying to follow thru some of the links from that page too!
Only read a couple of chapters of the book but working on it.
Very interesting indeed!
Thank You
Sunny
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: augonit on August 21, 2011, 08:41:06 PM
I'm interested in all American Indian prophecy, (and ways of life).  Does anyone know of a book that includes a more comprehensive N.A. prophecy list?
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 21, 2011, 10:38:13 PM
I'm interested in all American Indian prophecy, (and ways of life).  Does anyone know of a book that includes a more comprehensive N.A. prophecy list?

http://www.mysteriousworld.com/Journal/2003/Winter/GrandCanyon/#Links

enjoy
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 21, 2011, 10:47:07 PM
Going to move this Topic toward the front of the stack so someone can see it again,
A repeat, Santee native American group:

Peaceful Journey - Santee (Nat.Am)

arafel1964

LINK:  Update: Sorry this video removed due to copywright infringements

Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 22, 2011, 12:45:59 AM
I found this map for those reading the 1905 traditions book. Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 22, 2011, 01:01:51 AM
Anyone that might be interested in life in the canyon. Here you go .... Enjoy

http://www.hitthetrail.com/phantom/index.php

Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on August 22, 2011, 01:21:18 AM
I couldn't resist posting this special place. Havasu falls in the canyon near phantom ranch.

Enjoy ....
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: terrypat on August 22, 2011, 07:22:59 PM
Here's a PDF for those interested in the Sedona Vortex Experience. It includes Kachina Woman Rock  :o

http://www.lovesedona.com/vortmap3.pdf
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 23, 2011, 02:13:05 PM
Going to move this Topic toward the front of the stack so someone can see it again,
A repeat, Santee native American group:

Peaceful Journey - Santee (Nat.Am)

arafel1964

LINK: http://youtu.be/SA2IDO5yArk

Thank you for reposting


Glad U like it. I posted it a couple of times in the Planet X Flyby Music Topic...
I like it partly because I found it on a real NA site and it said Santee are NA's...
Anyway it really does something for me...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: terrypat on August 23, 2011, 07:16:35 PM
Thank you for the prompt. I have never opened that chapter on this site.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 24, 2011, 06:12:38 AM
Thank you for the prompt. I have never opened that chapter on this site.

Well Planet X Flyby Music may not be the most important Topic possibly - but it gives the mind a chance to relax in between confronting
all this. "Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast."  :)
[  http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=51.300 ]

Wouldn't it be fantastic to actually string together all the entries of the music... wow what a potpourri of human culture...
One thing I would like to find more is actual Native American - made music. You could post some here or in that Topic if you find some,
- Barb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Thehumbleman1 on September 03, 2011, 05:24:52 PM
Looked like the best place to put it.  I've seen this in the clouds one night.  The moon was behind the white wolf and lit it up so beautifully, the black wolf just had 2 stars for eyes and an outline that I could see it.  It rings true to me like the "Lion and the Lamb" just worded differently.

A Cherokee Legend
An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. "A fight is going on inside me," he said to the boy.

"It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil - he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego." He continued, "The other is good - he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you - and inside every other person, too."

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, "Which wolf will win?"

The old Cherokee simply replied, "The one you feed."

Here is the same story, but it is called "Grandfather Tells" which is also known as "The Wolves Within"
An old Grandfather said to his grandson, who came to him with anger at a friend who had done him an injustice, "Let me tell you a story.

I too, at times, have felt a great hate for those that have taken so much, with no sorrow for what they do.

But hate wears you down, and does not hurt your enemy. It is like taking poison and wishing your enemy would die. I have struggled with these feelings many times." He continued, "It is as if there are two wolves inside me. One is good and does no harm. He lives in harmony with all around him, and does not take offense when no offense was intended. He will only fight when it is right to do so, and in the right way.

But the other wolf, ah! He is full of anger. The littlest thing will set him into a fit of temper. He fights everyone, all the time, for no reason. He cannot think because his anger and hate are so great. It is helpless anger,for his anger will change nothing.

Sometimes, it is hard to live with these two wolves inside me, for both of them try to dominate my spirit."

The boy looked intently into his Grandfather's eyes and asked, "Which one wins, Grandfather?"

The Grandfather smiled and quietly said, "The one I feed."

I got this from the link below.
http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/TwoWolves-Cherokee.html

was reading on that site, this one is ringing so true:
Obligations of the True Path Walkers
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on September 19, 2011, 10:31:07 AM
This Navajo vid is from April 2011.. Good info on prayer...

Native American Elder Speaks And Calls All Tribes And People Together As One (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7qzbO4hao0&feature=player_embedded#ws)
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: Sunnybug on September 19, 2011, 11:41:45 AM
Thanks Terry!
That is how the world is supposed to be I think
Sunny
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on September 24, 2011, 10:12:44 PM
Thanks Terry!
That is how the world is supposed to be I think
Sunny


Here's some more correctness Sunny

(Part 1) Indigenous Native American Prophecy (Elders Speak part 1) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7cylfQtkDg&feature=related#)
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: Sunnybug on September 25, 2011, 04:54:07 AM
It seems so simple...but then the truth usually is. Very Nice. Watching the other two.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on September 25, 2011, 08:20:52 AM
It seems so simple...but then the truth usually is. Very Nice. Watching the other two.

I started watching the series last eve. I am going to finish it today. The weather here is absolute chamber of commerce. Can't be stuck inside. I here mom saying, "Honey, turn off the t.v. & go outside & play now. O.K. mom .... (Dream-Scape)
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: augonit on September 25, 2011, 10:51:25 AM
I watched the Indigenous Native American series about a year ago.  I recommend it.  In fact, I've often thought of watching it again!
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 04, 2011, 04:59:19 PM
I found this artist on a TV channel, Soundscapes.
Robert Tree Cody won the 1999 Native American Award for New Album,
Maze.
Mr. Cody speaks six Native American languages.

Robert Tree Cody and Xavier Quijas Yxayotl did an album called Crossroads,
Lovely song on there, Remembrance.

Here are some sample songs from You Tube,
- Yowbarb
...
Lakota Lullaby   5:60   61,362 Views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/6_StPpdW4Hg (http://youtu.be/6_StPpdW4Hg)

Uploaded by OperaRose17 on Apr 13, 2009

Robert Tree Cody Dreams from the Grandfather-Native American songs for flute)

..............

This one is from Crossroads album, different from the title I posted farther above,
YB
.............
Robert Tree Cody - Crossroads.avi    3:54   2,077 Views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/aH-vy6vxOPI (http://youtu.be/aH-vy6vxOPI)

Uploaded by CowboyBebop444 on May 9, 2010

...................
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/mystery/american/thief/popups/cody.html (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/mystery/american/thief/popups/cody.html)   PBS
Robert "Tree" Cody
Native American flutist

Native American flutist, dancer, artist, educator and actor Robert "Tree" Cody has performed throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Scandinavia, East Asia, Central and South America. The six-foot-ten inch "Tree," as friends and relatives know him, is very active on the powwow circuit today as a northern traditional dancer and at times arena director or master of ceremonies. An enrolled member of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Community and of Dakota heritage, Cody has lectured nationally and internationally on Native American dance and music at many reservations, museums, schools, universities and colleges.

A versatile flute player and a gifted singer, Cody has recorded 12 albums on the Canyon Records label. In 2000, his collaboration with Xavier Quijas Yxayotl of the Huichol Nation in Mexico, Crossroads, Music of Indigenous North America, was nominated for the Native American Category of the Indie Awards. His sixth album, Maze, won the 1999 Native American Music Award for Best New Age Album. His album with world-renowned Flamenco guitarist Ruben Romero, Native Flamenco, won 2000 Native American Music Awards for both World and Latin music. His newest album, Reflections, is a collaboration with Native American flautist Hovia S. Edwards
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: chaunska on October 04, 2011, 08:27:21 PM
I know this song well.   The lullaby  words are  "good boy with a good heart, go to sleep, night is here and is good.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 04, 2011, 08:51:42 PM
I know this song well.   The lullaby  words are  "good boy with a good heart, go to sleep, night is here and is good.

Chaunska, thanks!  :)
It's wonderful you know the words, 
Barb T.
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on October 10, 2011, 05:31:49 PM
Hopi High School Football....

I like there coach's attitude.

Hopi High School Football (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvX_0ceOFbU#)
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: terrypat on October 10, 2011, 05:33:37 PM
There fight song ....

Hopi Football (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9nMBQLaFMk&NR=1#)
Title: Re: Hopi Nation Official Website
Post by: Jimfarmer on October 11, 2011, 08:37:16 AM
Quote
There fight song ....

Ahh,  sounds like they got that from the Maori of New Zealand.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 03, 2011, 10:06:36 AM
http://www.ndakinnacenter.org/pages/calendar.php

The Nadakina Education Center
Our mission statement:

    The Ndakinna Education Center is an affiliate of the Greenfield Review Literary Center, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and charitable organization located in Greenfield Center, New York. The Center offers people of all ages unique hands-on learning experiences, creative presentations, and exhibit spaces focusing on regional Native American understandings, Adirondack culture, wilderness skills and awareness of the natural world.
:: ABOUT THE NDAKINNA EDUCATION CENTER ::

Our many wilderness based programs emphasize observation skills, interactive learning activities, critical thinking, cooperative problem solving and teambuilding for all ages. The Center is home to many educational exhibits, including Native tools, baskets, rattles, drums, shelters, clothing as well as a full-scale birch bark canoe and several wigwams.

Besides the exhibit space, the Center also contains a large presentation room, an animal tracking room with more than 1000 plaster casts of North American Mammal tracks, Cyber Tracker computer stations, and a gift shop. The gift shop offers visitors a rich collection of educational resources including books about Northeast Native American tribes/nations  (such as the Mohawk, Seneca, Abenaki, Wampanoag, Pequot, and Mohegan), animal tracking, wilderness crafts & skills, and Native storytelling.

We present most of our programs and series year-round at the Education Center and on the adjacent 80-acre Marion F. Bowman Bruchac Memorial Nature Preserve. The beautiful trails that wind through the woods are used for bird and tree walks, animal tracking, and for enjoyment by the participants of our youth, family and adult programs.

   

Storytelling at Ndakinna: - Joseph Bruchac

Storytelling is more than just entertainment. Traditionally, it is one of the oldest ways to pass on useful knowledge to people of all ages. A good story, whether written or spoken, both entertains and teaches.

Oral storytelling, by our staff and by our numerous guests, many of whom are respected American Indian elders, is central to the Ndakinna Education Center and part of virtually every program that we offer.

The oral storytelling experience, it seems, goes beyond the written word. It benefits and involves the individual in complex ways. Recent research on the structure of the brain and the ways in which young  people learn bears out the incredible effectiveness of this traditional means of passing on knowledge about the world around us, how we should properly relate to nature and the human community, and  how we may confront the many challenges of everyday life.

Further, although our storytelling is for boys and girls alike, some of that new research indicates that adolescent boys*--because of actual, measurable, hardwired differences in male brain development and brain structure--benefit in additional ways from storytelling. This is especially so when storytelling is combined with physical activity. Those benefits include gains in vocabulary, self-expression, cognition, socialization, attention span, and focus.




Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 03, 2011, 10:40:18 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/?gclid=CIHDjZLF5qwCFQIr7AodU30mIw

Serving The Nations   Celebrating The People 

An American Indian Physician Discusses Cancer in Indian Country and the Spirit of Eagles Program
By ICTMN Staff December 3, 2011

Read more:
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/03/an-american-indian-physician-discusses-cancer-in-indian-country-and-the-spirit-of-eagles-program-65567 http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/03/an-american-indian-physician-discusses-cancer-in-indian-country-and-the-spirit-of-eagles-program-65567#ixzz1fUxNVDUU

VIDEO  http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/12/03/an-american-indian-physician-discusses-cancer-in-indian-country-and-the-spirit-of-eagles-program-65567


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: terrypat on December 04, 2011, 04:36:36 AM
I'm really enjoying this section. THanks for posting.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 17, 2011, 09:36:37 AM
I'm really enjoying this section. THanks for posting.

 ;)

Andrew Vasquez-Flying Low   7:37  2,852

LINK:  http://youtu.be/PeM9QlMG-FE

Uploaded by illbassline on May 24, 2009

This is dedicated to Saunders Bears Tail , Jr. "Flying Low", and to Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans who never return
home.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 17, 2011, 09:40:47 AM
Wind River - Andrew Vasquez   5:35  2,342 Views

LINK: http://youtu.be/OVMsrIiU2so

Uploaded by BlueCountryBaby on Jan 8, 2010  5:35

Wind River By Andrew Vasquez
Couldn't find the whole song on Youtube so i uploaded this
Just listen and Relax!



Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 09, 2012, 03:18:17 PM
A link on FEMA site,
Yowbarb
..............................................................................
http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

"Some pages changed because we reorganized the site.  To assist you, here are a few suggested pages."
 
Indian Country....http://www.ready.gov/indian-country
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 11, 2012, 12:29:41 PM
TAYA NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW.wmv   3:57  109 Views

VIDEO LINK: http://youtu.be/HGD6FpT398o

Uploaded by SHERRICK63 on Jan 1, 2012
TAYA DANCING THE PCI NEW YEARS EVE 2011 POW-WOW
POARCH,AL



...
Red Road Pow Wow #1 * Fresno CA * 12-31-11  1:56 218

VIDEO LINK: http://youtu.be/v2qe1DLj7LY

Uploaded by gh62739 on Dec 31, 2011
New Year's Eve Red Road Pow Wow 12-31-11 ** Held at the Fresno (CA) Convention Center Exhibit Hall

...  
Red Road Pow Wow #2 * Fresno CA * 12-31-11  2:13   257 views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/nmyFaj1F97U

Uploaded by gh62739 on Jan 1, 2012
New Year's Eve Red Road Pow Wow 12-31-11 * Held at the Fresno (CA) Convention Center Exhibit Hall

...The Wikwemikong Singers - New Year's Eve Pow Wow Dec 31, 2011   7:03 212 Views
VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/mLuO_KuGFmg

Uploaded by shinywingsgirl on Jan 1, 2012
The Wikwemikong Singers hosting the New Year's Eve Pow Wow - Dec 31, 2011 - Wikwemikong, ON Canada - Wasse-Abin High School.

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 11, 2012, 01:04:40 PM
Here's a few more recent Pow Wow videos I found,
Yowbarb
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
...................................................................................
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Extended: National Chief's message to Canada  18:01 399

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/aDJQOj_2H_Q 

Uploaded by globalnational on Jan 24, 2012
First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo sends a clear, positive, message to all peoples of Canada as the First Nations Assembly kicks off in Ottawa.
...

Red Road Pow Wow Evening Entry New Years Eve 2012 2:53 181 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/mfaLoVMLYqk

Uploaded by aananimity on Jan 4, 2012
Evening entry on New Years Eve 2012

.....................................................................................
BLAKELAND DANCING NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW 2011
3:03 1:13 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/-s5ihx_Nylc

Uploaded by SHERRICK63 on Jan 1, 2012
.........................................................................................

Winnebago New Year's Eve Pow-Wow Women's Switch Contest 2:38    281 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/PjFtBqF26SE

Uploaded by 712beast on Jan 1, 2012
Michelle Cayou showing her Fancy Grass Dance Moves!

..............................................................................................
January 1, 2012 17:14 lillooet new years pow wow.

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/vQKXMESz07I

Uploaded by thunderman1964 on Jan 1, 2012
chicken dance !!

...
Santee New years eve powwow mens fancy shawl 2011 rd 1 2:21 139 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/TWRza80jPWs

Uploaded by ndnjerome on Dec 31, 2011
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
...................................................................................................
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 11, 2012, 01:12:51 PM
Last one for now, this is from mid - December,
Yowbarb
...................................................................................................
Black Hills powwow womens fancy shawl 2:20 230 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/8zXw4IrooCI

Uploaded by daniellesharrison on Dec 15, 2011
Womens fancy shawl
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 15, 2012, 09:34:56 PM
Awareness Mag

http://www.awarenessmag.com/julaug08/ja08_for_native_americans.htm

For Native Americans ...
 Domes Blend Their Ancestral Past with the Modern World
 By Carol Lanham
 
Deep in the Grand Canyon, in a remote area accessible only on foot, by horseback or by helicopter, a dream is taking shape among members of the Havasupai tribe who inhabit the land. It is a dream for a better way of life, in harmony with their ancestral past yet in step with the realities of the modern world.
 
It is a dream that began with Uqualla, a Havasupai tribal chief and medicine man, but soon came to involve others throughout the United States. The dream has a name — the Jeva Project — and a purpose —  to bring round, sustainable housing not only to the Havasu Canyon but to other Native American communities as well.
 
The Jeva Project, named for the Havasupai word for healing, involves building Monolithic Domes to replace aging and cramped housing on native lands. Made of steel-reinforced, insulated concrete, the domes offer a number of advantages over traditional buildings.
 
“The true ceremonial shape is the round circle, symbolic of Mother Earth, Father Sun, Sister Moon, and one’s life circle,” says Uqualla, who not only is spearheading the Jeva Project but also travels the world in his work as a medicine man. “Our ancestors knew this as evidenced by their round floor plans that were continuous with no beginning or end.”
 
The dome homes offer practical advantages as well. Due to the materials used in their construction, they are permanent structures designed to last for centuries and offer protection against severe weather. They also are energy efficient, costing 50 percent less to heat and cool than traditional buildings of the same size.
Perhaps most importantly for Native Americans in remote areas, locals can be easily trained to build the domes and most of the construction materials can be dropped in by helicopter if necessary, making them a cost-effective alternative to traditional housing.
 
“The hope is by showcasing several of these dwellings in the beauty of the Havasu Canyon area, other tribal nations could see the benefits of this housing technology that incorporates the original dwelling concept of the ancients for use in the modern world,” according to the mission statement posted on the project’s website.
 
Rick Crandall, a Mesa-based architect who designed the five domes that will be constructed in the Jeva Project’s first phase, says the buildings are in keeping with the traditions of several Native American tribes. “Many of the Arizona and New Mexico tribes consider circles to be a sacred shape, and this is especially true of Pueblo, Tewa, Anastasi, Hopi and Navajo tribes.
 
Round buildings aren’t new and indeed were part of the basic culture of the American Plains natives going back for many centuries,” he says. “It was only when the westward expansion began in the 1840s that square buildings were introduced to these tribes and all of the square buildings were constructed for them.”
 
Monolithic Domes planned for the Havasu Canyon would not be the first to be built for Native Americans. Several dome schools have been built on Indian reservations throughout the state of Arizona, as well as in New Mexico and South Dakota. In Oklahoma, plans are currently under way for a multipurpose Monolithic Dome building to be used by the Muskogee Indians.
 
Monolithic Domes were invented in 1978 by three Idaho natives who believed that nature’s perfect shape offered a better way to build. David B. South had become fascinated with domes after hearing a lecture on geodesic domes by their inventor, Buckminster Fuller.
 
But South thought he could build a dome more efficiently. After much experimentation, he and his brothers, Barry and Randy, came up with a way to build a one-piece, concrete structure that today is known as a Monolithic Dome.
 
The building process begins with the placement of a ringbeam footing and the pouring of a circular steel-reinforced concrete slab floor. An Airform, a tarp made of tough, single-ply roofing material, is then attached to the ring base and inflated. Once the Airform is inflated, work moves to the interior where three inches of polyurethane foam is sprayed on the structure.
 
A grid of steel rebar is then placed into the foam and later embedded in Shotcrete that ranges from 4 inches at the top to 8 inches at the base. This process creates a safe, permanent and energy-efficient structure.
 
In the three decades since their invention, Monolithic Domes have been built all over the United States and around the world. They are being used as homes, schools, churches, storage facilities, gymnasiums and performing arts centers. The Navajo Nation was the first Native American tribe to build a Monolithic Dome.
 
In 1996, a school district on a Navajo reservation in Arizona commissioned Crandall to design two Monolithic Dome school buildings largely because of the relatively low construction costs and energy efficiency, but also because the buildings’ shape would be in keeping with the tribe’s sacred traditions.
 
Leupp School, with students in grades kindergarten through 12, completed its Monolithic Dome library and parent center in August 1997. The building, located in Leupp, Arizona, is also available to the community for town meetings and social get-togethers.
 
In nearby Birdsprings, Little Singer Community School completed a multipurpose dome building a few months later. The dome includes a gym, complete with a basketball court and jogging track, as well as classrooms.
 
To make the building compatible with sacred traditions, four entrances were incorporated into the dome, one for each direction. In addition, each entrance features three designs symbolizing the full circle of life. That totals 12 — an important number in Navaho cosmology.
 
Ron White, who was assistant superintendent of Tolchii Kooh Charter Schools, which was in charge of building both schools, said the domes have met expectations for durability and energy efficiency. But he pointed out that the idea initially met with some resistance simply because the domes were so different from the traditional buildings that were part of the modern-day reservation. “We learned that trying to make changes in the building mindset is difficult to do,” he says.
 
School officials in Whiteriver, Arizona also encountered some skepticism when they recommended construction of a Monolithic Dome elementary school on the Apache Reservation. Although the Apaches traditionally built wickiups — wood and grass structures shaped like a tepee with a smoke hole at the top — they now live in traditional, square buildings.
 
By making the dome designs and plans available to the community, providing tribal members with information, and welcoming spectators at the construction site, the doubts were soon eliminated. In 1998, the three domes that make up Cradleboard Elementary opened to rave reviews.
 
Soon, there will be Monolithic Dome homes on a reservation as well. The first dome housing community is slated for completion this summer on the Navajo Reservation in Taloni Lake, Arizona.
Built by Dome Technology of Idaho, 36 concrete dome shells are completed, but work still needs to be done on the interiors of these new homes. “It is believed that with reasonable care, these buildings will stand long after other housing projects have gone the way of the world,” White says.
 
Meanwhile, construction on homes for the Havasupai tribe has been temporarily delayed due to the unexpected death in April of Archie Eschborn, who along with Uqualla, was spearheading plans for the Jeva Project. It was Eschborn who first came up with the idea for building Monolithic Domes in the Havasu Canyon after getting to know Mason Rumney, a long-time dome owner in Sedona.
 
Upon meeting Uqualla, Eschborn realized they both had a similar vision for the Havasupai tribe and they became actively involved in securing financing necessary to make their dream a reality.
Before his death, Eschborn was working with several U.S government organizations, including the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Department of the Interior, among others.
 
Eschborn’s widow, Linnea, along with Uqualla, Crandall and Rumney remain committed to making the project a reality. Uqualla, who teaches globally, is already making plans to host medicine meetings in the Jeva Project’s ceremonial complex once it is completed.
 
“I know that the Jeva Project is now up to me, and Archie’s wife, Linnea. We’ve been given the talking stick, and take the responsibility of carrying the project through. My hope is to have the Havasupai tribe be the leading force in the return to tribal traditions.”
 
For more information on the Jeva Project, visit www.jevaproject.com. For more information about Monolithic Domes, please visit www.monolithic.com, www.uqualla.com, or call Mason Rumney at (928) 300-7352.
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2008
July/August Index page
WELCOME TO THE
JULY/ AUGUST 2008 ISSUE OF
AWARENESS MAGAZINE

.....
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 15, 2012, 09:57:46 PM
http://www.monolithic.com/stories/tolchiikooh

Tolchii Kooh’s Monolithic Dome Schools – 1998
 
Freda (Grones) Parker March 12, 2009, 4:35 p.m.
Featured Monolithic Dome Schools http://www.monolithic.com/topics/featured-schools


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: steedy on March 16, 2012, 07:56:21 AM
How can I subscribe to the Awareness Magazine?  It looks like a cool magazine.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 18, 2012, 11:42:27 AM
How can I subscribe to the Awareness Magazine?  It looks like a cool magazine.

Awareness Magazine -
southern California's Guide to Conscious living

Home Page:
http://www.awarenessmag.com/

Awareness Magazine, Subscribe:
http://www.awarenessmag.com/subscribe.html

.............
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: steedy on March 19, 2012, 09:32:42 AM
I tried to subscribe to the e-mag version, but kept getting an error message.  Oh well.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 21, 2012, 10:05:17 AM
I tried to subscribe to the e-mag version, but kept getting an error message.  Oh well.

Uh, OK maybe I posted the link wrong will fix it...
back soon,
YB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 21, 2012, 02:08:01 PM
Founder's Powwow Grand Entry 2012   12:06

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/rjP1j96gG8c

Uploaded by sintegleskautube on Feb 8, 2012
Grand Entry February 5, 2012. Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation
..........................................................................................
Ladies Jingle Dress Brandon DOTC Pow wow 2012 2:27

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/Jj1X_UYtACc

Uploaded by Alenefloyd18 on Jan 30, 2012

..............
Poarch Creek Warrior Competition    2:35

VIDEO LINK: http://youtu.be/08pjRLPl1gE

Uploaded by PoarchCreekPowWow on Feb 9, 2012
2011 Poarch Creek PowWow Warriors Competition!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poarch_Creek_Indian_Reservation 
...........
(Poarch Creek Indian Reservation is in Alabama. - Yowbarb)
.....................

Young Spirit at Brandon Manitoba pow wow 2012  4:13

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/QPuiI_e5SHQ

Uploaded by skootchboy on Jan 30, 2012
New crow hop solo

..........................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: throwback1952 on March 25, 2012, 07:51:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X5A2NTyBjQ
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 30, 2012, 08:08:07 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X5A2NTyBjQ

Nice!
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 30, 2012, 08:24:48 AM

On the H2 Channel today at 3 PM EDT (Ch 127) there is a program entitled,
"Legend of the Hairy Beast."
This program will show Native American artwork depicting the elusive humanoids; also go into
the old legends of "Big Foot."
Hopefully there will be interviews with some of the tribespeople.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 25, 2012, 01:07:05 AM
http://www.keepersofindigenousways.org/id29.html

KEEPERS OF INDIGENOUS WAYS, Inc. a non profit...

“You must teach your children that the ground beneath their feet is the ashes of your grandfathers. So that they will respect the land, tell your children that the earth is rich with the lives of our kin. Teach your children what we have taught our children, that the earth is our mother. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth. If men abuse the ground, they abuse themselves.” Chief Seattle
Native Americans have always professed being caretakers of their ancestral lands, even in these times of colonialization, we see ourselves as the first environmentalist/friends of the earth. In more cases than not our ancestral lands have been abused, destroyed and desecrated. These disrespectful acts or contemptuous treatment of our lands, which is held to be sacred by our people, are often times over looked by many developers. Archeologist/Anthropologist/Contractors/workers and unsanctioned monitors are compromised or paid to look the other way. We are hoping with education that what is left of our ancestral lands that a mutual understanding can be achieved, that no one has the right to destroy history, a history that should be shared by all. We recognize that the legacy, the unwritten stories, lies in grounds of our Mother Earth. This is our history and must be protected for future generations.
   We recommend contacting, Chief Anthony Morales and or son Adrian, they are our tribal monitors when any kind of development is going on anywhere in the Los Angeles Basin, which includes the Palos Verdes Peninsula and 4 sacred islands (Catalina Is., San Clemente Is., Santa Barbara Is., San Nicolas Is.), which is our Ancestral Lands. Especially if any kind of indication of a potential sacred sites, such as burial grounds or artifacts may be found. The tribal monitors work with, but not limited to, archeologists and the developers for the best possible outcome. The only sanctioned tribal monitors are from tribe-Tongva/Gabrieleno of the San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians. They are the only recognized tribe by the courts of Los Angeles and the State of California of the Los Angeles Basin and are also registered with the State of California's Heritage Commission.
   We pray and support people
         such as Gary Johnson, who has the heart, understanding and concern for what is sacred. Gary has incredible story and relationship
         with this area. We ask all people to join us as caretakers in this collaborative effort, to be vigilant, we ask the creator
         to help us in this quest.

In 2005, avocational archaeologist, Gary Johnson, discovered an unrecorded Native American site in Rolling Hills Estates on the Palos Verdes Peninsula.  Once he realized that this large site was a significant discovery, he contacted professional archaeologist, Carl Lipo from California State University at Long Beach, to verify his findings and assist him in recording the site into the archaeological record.  The site, recorded in 2009, is now designated as CA-LAN-3863, also known as Thunderhawk Hill.
            Cultural resources discovered at the site include stone choppers, scrappers and projectile points.  It has been estimated that 99 % of the raw materials used to make these tools came from local sources. Objects recovered include several varieties of local chert, sandstone, quartz, flint, soapstone, river rock and imported obsidian from the Coso Volcanic Field.  Obsidian was hydration tested and was dated to approximately 3000 BCE.
            Local tribal leaders have also been contacted and they have verified that the location is an historic Tongva habitation area, and they support future scientific research at this site.  CA-LAN-3863 is located on Palos Verdes Land Conservancy property and they are aware of the recent findings and they too support further research.
            Mr. Johnson has now focused his attention on another parcel in Rolling Hills Estates where development, which includes 114 new single family homes, a reconfigured 18-hole golf course, and a new approximately 61,000 square foot clubhouse and related facilities are planned.  The 225.5-acre project site is located on the existing sites of the Chandler Quarry and Rolling Hills Country Club (26311 and 27000 Palos Verdes Drive East) in the northeasterly portion of the City of Rolling Hills Estates.  The proposed development is located adjacent to CA-LAN-3863.
            As the plans for the Rolling Hills Country Club/Chandler Quarry site moved forward, McKenna et al of Whittier were hired and they conducted an EIR in 2006. The public comment period for the draft EIR commenced on May 1, 2009 and ended on June 30, 2009.  Their report acknowledges that human remains were discovered in the proposed project area and were reported by D.L. True in 1960.  Upon conducting a phase II investigation of the area where human remains were reported, the following statement was written in the EIR.
According to the Phase II testing program conducted by McKenna et al., the site appears to have been inaccurately mapped. However, although the site does not exist at its reported location, it may exist within the confines of the immediate area. Mitigation Measure CULT-1 should be implemented to ensure that no impacts to human remains interred in informal burial grounds occur.
 
CULT-1 suggests that an archaeological monitor and a Native American monitor work on site when the development gets under way to ensure that human remains are properly documented if found.  Ultimately, McKenna’s recommendation in the report regarding the disturbance of human remains in the project area was, “ Less than significant with the incorporation of mitigation measures.”
 
             Mr. Johnson is concerned, that at the time that the EIR was written the existence of CA-LAN-3863 was unknown to McKenna et al, and that this company did not fully investigate the existence of human remains on the Rolling Hills Country Club/Chandler Quarry project site.  Mr. Johnson and members of the Tongva tribe, would like to see the area reinvestigated as they are concerned that appropriate testing procedures were not conducted by McKenna et al in areas where human remains are likely to be found.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on July 08, 2012, 05:22:50 AM
Thank you for the posts, Barb! Definitely good reading :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2012, 03:06:52 AM
Thank you for the posts, Barb! Definitely good reading :)


Oh, hello Pbutter72.  :) This was all news to me, and I am so glad there some successes in protecting
sacred sites.
I just saw an  article, on New American Media, Environment section. Posting it in next post, separately so it will be easier to print out ,etc.
Yowbarb
...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2012, 03:08:43 AM
http://newamericamedia.org/2011/08/glen-cove-a-spiritual-victory-for-the-ohlone-people.php  Print


http://newamericamedia.org/2011/08/glen-cove-a-spiritual-victory-for-the-ohlone-people.php

Native American Activists Save Sacred Burial Ground From Bulldozers

New America Media, News Feature, Jacob Simas, Posted: Aug 04, 2011

VALLEJO, Calif. – Hundreds gathered at Glen Cove, Calif., last weekend for a closing ceremony to celebrate what Native American activists and their allies are declaring an historic victory.

It was a victory over a city-park development that would have bulldozed the area for parking lots, plumbing and paved paths -- on one of the last undeveloped ancient burial sites of indigenous people remaining in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Although their 108-day occupation of the land the Ohlone people called "Sogorea Te” had ended, the protest group hoped the action marks the beginning of a new chapter for the 15 acres of land surrounding an inlet of water now known as Glen Cove along the Carquinez Strait. The cove connects the Sacramento Delta to the San Francisco Bay.

“Sacred Fire”

Just beyond the “sacred fire” -- built on the first day of the occupation and burned continuously until it was allowed to extinguish last Saturday – activists here had erected two large tepees. Rising 20-feet tall, they stood in contrast to the modern homes and apartments perched on the hillside above, the closest ones only yards from the camp.

During their occupation, camping tents and teepees lined up in an open field of tall grass overlooking the calm waters of the cove.

Dozens of people had been sleeping in these tents as long as the fire burned, occupying the land in a last-ditch effort to protect it from a city-park development. That project would have bulldozed hillsides to build the park, with bathrooms and modern conveniences, on top of and through the land where Bay Area tribes had buried their ancestors for nearly 4,000 years.

The occupation of the land at Glen Cove began on April 14, and lasted three-and-a-half months, but the seeds of the struggle were planted years ago. Occupation was not the first path chosen, but the final card played by a group of people who had nothing more in their hand.

“It’s been a 12-year and 7-month battle with the City of Vallejo, and with GVRD,” explained Wounded Knee De Ocampo, an elder and a veteran of American Indian activism. According to De Ocampo, officials from GVRD (Greater Vallejo Recreational District) first approached the Vallejo Intertribal Council in 1999, asking for approval to raze the land and proceed with their park development.

Although GVRD and the city hold title to the land at Glen Cove, the area had long been verified as an ancient Native American burial ground by surveyors and anthropologists from the University of California, Berkeley. Over the years they have unearthed a number of ancient remains and cultural artifacts of the numerous tribes who once used the area.

“Twelve years ago, the GVRD approached the Vallejo Intertribal Council, a community group of people from different tribes, asking them permission if they could come in and do this work,” said Corrina Gould, a Karkin and Chochenyo Ohlone.

One of several lead organizers of the Committee to Protect Glen Cove, she continued, “That just wasn't the right process to go through. There are actually laws that protect burial grounds, and what they needed to do was to contact those who were most likely descended from this area.”

“Likely Descendants” of Those Buried

The problem, according to GVRD general manager Shane McAffee, was that the activists who were most vocal about opposing the park development lacked that official designation as “Most Likely Descendants” -- despite their Ohlone and Miwok ancestry, two tribes that historically were present at Glen Cove.

“On one side, even if we wanted to talk to the protesters, they are not an organized, official group with authority,” said Shane McAffee, general manager of GVRD. “They weren’t organized enough to sign a binding agreement.”

In 2003, GVRD began discussions with the Yocha Dehe and Cortina band of Wintun Indians, two federally recognized tribes, who the Native American Heritage Commission of California had designated as the people “most likely descended” from those buried at Glen Cove.

Those tribes however, were not immediately involved with the Native American activists who originally took up the cause of protecting the cove, and plans to move forward on the project stalled.

Inaction was the status quo until last April, when, according to Gould, the activists learned that GVRD had abruptly decided to end discussion on their master plan and move forward. GVRD would bulldoze the site, said Gould, beginning on April 14, only one week after having spoken to the activists and mentioned nothing of this plan.

Gould stated, “After discussing with them for 12 years how we didn’t want them to desecrate this area by putting parking lots and grading hills and doing those things, they decided they were going to go ahead and do the work anyway. They treated us basically like we had no rights. Collectively, we decided it was time for us to be on the land.” She added, “This was the last option.”

The number of activists occupying the site quickly grew to scores of Native and non-Native people as word of the action spread from coast-to-coast, by word of mouth and with the help of a website set up by volunteers.

“It was time for indigenous people across this country to take a stand and say ‘no more’ to desecrating the sacred sites of our ancestors,” said De Ocampo. “No more digging up our ancestors and putting them in garbage cans and in garbage bags, no more digging up our ancestors and putting them in museums and leaving them in cardboard boxes and gym lockers and taking their artifacts and their sacred objects.”

De Ocampo stressed that UC Berkeley has 13,000 remains stored, “and some of those remains came right from this sacred site called Sogorea Te.”

A Cultural Easement

After three months of occupation, things were at a virtual standstill on July 14, when 30 activists and supporters went to Vallejo City Hall to speak about their cause at a council meeting. The stream of testimony that night caused Mayor Osby Davis to declare, “We’re either going to have an easement, or we’re going to give staff direction to enforce the law. That’s the bottom line.”

On July 20, after 98 days of occupation, GVRD and the City of Vallejo opted for compromise over conflict, agreeing to a “cultural easement” proposed by the Yocha Dehe and Cortina tribes to end the standoff.

The legally binding agreement established a committee consisting of GVRD, the City of Vallejo and the Yocha Dehe and Cortina tribes, to jointly govern the 15 disputed acres. Any future decisions regarding development on the land will now need a unanimous vote from all parties to proceed.

Although the activists’ occupation and protests pressured the city to agree to the cultural easement, it was money – $100,000 that the Yocha Dehe and Cortina tribes paid to the cash-strapped City of Vallejo – that may have forced the final settlement. The two tribes agreed to pay the city $100,000 to be included in the "cultural easement" agreement, allowing them to have a say in the project.

“Both of those are gaming tribes, and we know that the City of Vallejo is in dire straits for financial help,” said Gould. “So one of the key things is, [the city] said, ‘If you want to partner and be a part of this, then you need to also pay into it.’”

According to McAffee, the $100,000 payment was also an insurance policy of sorts, just in case GVRD was faced down the line with legal fees to give the protesters an injunction to get them off the land.

Luckily for all involved, it never came to that.

In addition to accepting the cultural easement, McAffee said city officials have already agreed to change four things in their master plan to appease the protesters: 1) The elimination of permanent bathrooms, 2) a downsizing of the proposed parking lot, 3) changes to the paved trail plan for a more water-permeable pathway and 4) an agreement to not tear up an existing concrete driveway that the activists fear will disturb buried remains.

Even though parties to the settlement are yet to work out some details, such as how much the city will scale down the parking lot, McAffee commented, “From our perspective, we’re still achieving what we wanted to do.” Especially important, he said, will be preserving the site, while also providing people a park with access to the water.

Setting a Precedent

At the closing ceremony, the activists who held peaceful vigil at Glen Cove since April expressed an even greater sense of victory, emphasizing that the cultural easement brokered between Native Americans and a city government might have larger implications, beyond Vallejo.

“This is a landmark decision. It sets a precedent,” said Gould, “because something like this has never been done within city limits or with a park district within a city.”

In the past, she went on, California merely allowed American Indians to make recommendations that developers could ignore. “This particular document stops that from happening all together. Even if the property changes hands, the easement is in place, and so forever the tribes will have that designation,” Gould said.

Gould and her fellow activists hope victory will breathe life into similar struggles for the recognition of indigenous sacred sites and burial grounds across the United States. The importance of protecting such sites from desecration has become a major cause of indigenous peoples across the country and even globally in recent years.

In 2008, American Indian Movement cofounder Dennis Banks and other Native American activists organized The Longest Walk 2, an 8,200 mile prayer walk across the United States, largely to raise awareness about the importance of protecting of sacred ancestral lands.

"There are people all over working to protect sacred sites, who were looking at this to see how it would turn out," said Gould. She explained that only a few of the 425 burial mounds, called shellmounds, that once ringed the Bay Area, and none of them really exist now.

She added, “Sagora Te is one of the last burial grounds still on open land where we can actually touch our feet to the ground and say our prayers the way we're supposed to and pass that teaching on to the next generation.”
Even now, activists are calling attention to another sacred site-protection effort, this time in Arizona. The San Francisco Peaks, near Flagstaff in northern Arizona -- sacred to the Navajo and Hopi tribes -- are being considered for the construction of wastewater pipelines that would be used to produce fake snow for Arizona’s Snowbowl ski destination.

"If the indigenous people don’t stand up to protect these sacred sites and burial grounds of our ancestors, there will be no more places where we can go and sing our songs and offer our medicine and our prayers to our ancestors, who stood up for us,” said De Ocampo.

The struggle for Glen Cove, he said, represents something deeper still.

“Our ancestors were crying, and the people answered the call. There have been other events, like Alcatraz that happened in 1969. And in 1973 there was a stand at Wounded Knee, South Dakota. Now, there is Sogorea Te. It brought light back to indigenous people to stand up and say, ‘Enough is enough!’ It was a spiritual gathering here. It was a spiritual victory.”


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2012, 03:18:02 AM

Thank you for the posts, Barb! Definitely good reading :)


Oh, hello Pbutter72.  :)
I am so glad there some successes in protecting
sacred sites.
I just saw an  article, on New American Media, Environment section. Posting it in next post, separately so it will be easier to print out ,etc. I just realized Glen Cove is a site I had previously posted about...there were some demonstrations about it and the battle is won.
Yowbarb
...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: inselemel on July 10, 2012, 03:49:58 AM
Excellent news!
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 10, 2012, 11:54:14 AM
Excellent news!

I know! It's amazing when something actually goes right...
 :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 03, 2012, 02:45:15 PM
http://www.silvertribe.com/Native-American-Indian-Navajo-Jewelry-Turquoise-Dream-Catcher-AS48113
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 24, 2012, 11:39:43 AM
http://www.youtube.com/user/skabewis?feature=results_main  IndianCountryTV.com

Native News Update August 22, 2012  7:32  46 views   
by skabewis 1 day ago

VIDEO:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Q_oyVas2zk&feature=share&list=UUIlHgkNz1tY5ekuksKfgLjg

Published on Aug 22, 2012 by skabewis
Another Native News Update with anchor Paul DeMain from the studios of IndianCountryTV.com.

Today's Stories: UN experts call on US to consult on sale of Pe' Sla - Tribal activist in SD has 7 protection orders - More crews head to Yakama Reservation fire - White bison to stay at farm in western Conn - Indictment names 4 from Red Lake Reservation - Red Lake Skate Park ready for grand opening - Chickasaw Art Show and Market set for Oct 5 & 6.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 24, 2012, 11:53:07 AM
25th UPPER MATTAPONI POW-WOW 2012   13:55

VIDEO:  http://youtu.be/Pcboofxi8Dc

Published on May 30, 2012 by David James
Presented here is the 25th Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribe Pow-wow. This annual event is held in
King William County, Virginia. Our clip is the longer version of the previous Upper Mattaponi film
that was posted

..........................
Yowbarb Note:  The tribe is located in Virginia...  Reference,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattaponi

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/06/va-indian-population-now-shadow-its-past

2009 PHOTO:  "Virginia Indian chiefs gather at a pow wow held last month to raise money to lobby for federal benefits. From left : Chief Anne Richardson of the Rappahannock, Chief Kenneth Branham of the Monacan, Chief Ken Adams of the Upper Mattaponi, Chief Barry Bass of the Nansemond and Chief Steve Adkins of the Chickahominy. (STEVE EARLEY | THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT)"

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 24, 2012, 12:16:38 PM
Photos:

1)  Late Mattaponi Chief Webster “Little Eagle” Custalow

2)   A Great Grandson of the late Mattaponi Chief Webster "Little Eagle" Custalow, Dalton Shayn “Two
       Feathers” Custalow (front, center), flanked by his mother, Leigh Anne, and father, Leon,

3)  Another Great Grandson of the late Mattaponi Chief Webster "Little Eagle" Custalow, Jeffrey “Big
      Thunder” Whitman.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2012, 09:21:54 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shinnecock_Reservation

Shinnecock Reservation is an Indian reservation for members of the Shinnecock Indian Nation in the town of Southampton in Suffolk County, New York, United States. It lies on the east side of Shinnecock Bay on southeastern Long Island, near Tuckahoe, Shinnecock Hills, and the village of Southampton. The population was 504 as of the 2000 census.
..................................................................................................
Shinnecock Pow Wow September 1, 2012   3:50

VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/OnnqDcHzXI0

Published on Sep 2, 2012 by americasroof

..................................................................................................
Shinnecock Powwow: Celebrating a Proud Heritage  5:11

VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/UgLc2ZB4fnM

Published on Jun 5, 2012 by PeterPan1056
Shinnecock Indian Nation Powwow, Southampton, NY
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2012, 09:38:17 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oneida_Indian_Nation

Oneida Indian Nation
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oneida Indian Nation
Total population
1,000+
Regions with significant populations
 United States (Vernon, New York)      
Languages
Onyota'aka, English, other Iroquoian dialects
Related ethnic groups
Oneida tribe, Seneca Nation, Onondaga Nation, Tuscarora Nation, Mohawk Nation, Cayuga Nation, other Iroquoian peoples
The Oneida Indian Nation (hereinafter referred to as OIN) is the federally recognized Oneida tribe that resides in New York, where the tribe originated and held its historic territory long before European colonialism. It is an Iroquoian-speaking people, and its early nation was one of the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, or Hauendosaunee. Three other recognized Oneida tribes are in other locations where they migrated during and after the American Revolutionary War: one in Wisconsin in the United States, and two in Ontario, Canada.
Today it owns tribal land in Verona, Oneida, and Canastota, on which it operates a number of businesses, including a resort with a Class III gambling casino.
................................
Oneida Nation Pow Wow  3:56

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/A4mexpgwmrM

Published on May 10, 2012 by OneidaProductions
2011 Oneida 4th of July Pow Wow. Sampling of different types of dancers seen at our fantastic event.
...............

Women's Jingle at Oneida Powwow 2012   2:49

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/4QN3kJQpK40

Published on Jun 30, 2012 by rawkinkid14
Friday.
1st song
Young Bear
................................
Oneida Pow-Wow Womens Smoke Dancers 2011 0:25

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/pa3bD09F6WE

Uploaded by peach107 on Jul 4, 2011

.................................................................................

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2012, 10:01:28 PM
Feast of Green Corn and Dance

http://www.thewesterlysun.com/entertainment/article_eec3bc01-2c3d-591f-8971-39b9f81d774b.html

Indian nations unite for Schemitzun
...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashantucket_Pequot_Tribe
Mashantucket Pequot Tribe

Main article: Pequot
The Mashantucket Pequot are a small Native American tribal nation of the Algonquian language community in the state of Connecticut. Within the tribe's Reservation, in 41°27′58″N 71°58′28″W Ledyard, New London County, Connecticut, the Mashantucket Pequot operate Foxwoods Resort Casino, the world's largest resort casino, in terms of gaming space and number of slot machines, and one of the most successful economically.[1] The tribe achieved federal recognition by an act of Congress in 1983, the eighth tribal nation to have gained recognition through the political process. Membership is based on proven descent from tribal members listed in the 1900 Census.[2]
...

Schemitzun 2008  6:37

VIDEO Link: http://youtu.be/VJbG-gB0Yxo

Uploaded by norwichbulletin on Aug 22, 2008
The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe presents Schemitzun 2008, Feast of the Green Corn and Dance. Event runs from August 21-24, 2008.
...
Womens Smoke Dance 2008 1:40

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/c8YSIhD4XOM

Uploaded by ChevyHawk on Jan 5, 2011
Schemitzun 2008 Pow Wow with champion Smoke Dancer Valerie Parker in the dark pink dress.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2012, 10:17:38 PM
Mashantucket powwow highlights the tradition of dance 1:08

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/Uq-Tk5Shckw

Uploaded by thedayct on Jul 7, 2011
Dancers, musicians and storytellers exhibited a variety of dance styles and other traditions at the Mashantucket Pequot education powwow
...
Brule performs at Schemitzun 2007  5:33

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/Mn1t8nTHbwA

Uploaded by kickingbear on May 30, 2008
This video is of the Native American contemporary rock group "Brule". They performed at the Fox Theater inside of Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut. Foxwoods is owned by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2012, 10:19:33 PM
http://www.native-languages.org/languages.htm#alpha

Native American Tribes and Languages
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 19, 2012, 03:29:13 PM
What's in the Heart - Dr. Don Warne, Oglala Lakota - Why the film is important  4:20

Video Link:  http://youtu.be/IUR4D7omnpE

Uploaded by watersongproductions on Feb 23, 2009
The purpose of the film, What's In the Heart Cant Be Taken, is to create better understanding of the philosophy of healing and Seventh Generation decision-making within the Lakota Medicine Wheel. It highlights the creative, generative programs going on within Native American tribes nationwide. It is a film that exposes the generational trauma inflicted upon American Indians and celebrates their triumph of culture and tradition in the face of such ongoing trauma. The proceeds from the film will go to the scholarship fund of the AISHS as well as other efforts of the Medicine Wheel Foundation.
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What's in the Heart - Can't be Taken  8:14   1,392 Views

Video Link:  http://youtu.be/izBr_XRy7Rw

Uploaded by watersongproductions on Mar 18, 2011
What's in the Heart looks at the reasons for the health crisis among Native Americans. The film traces the life of a 14-year old Lakota boy who survived the Wounded Knee Massacre, and went on to forge a life based on forgiving "those who had done that to him." Through this boy's story, interviews with his grandson, health experts and community leaders, the film will illustrate how one community is using the best of traditional and modern medicine practices to heal from its past. Distributed by Tubemogul.

........................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 20, 2012, 04:20:32 AM
Here's a little info on Dr. Don Warne who did the film, What's in the Heart - Can't be Taken,
mentioned in previous post.
- Yowbarb

Site: http://www.kittyfarmer.com/donald.html

About Us
Kitty Farmer
Medicine Wheel Foundation
Donald Warne, MD, MPH
Contact Us
Home

Our Film
What's In The Heart
Synopsis
On Camera Experts
Advisors

Donald Warne, MD, MPH

As a physician and traditional medicine person, Donald Warne, MD, MPH, synthesizes his medical training with his cultural knowledge as a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe to deepen both the intelligence and effectiveness of his work in health policy development. He brings wisdom to science and science to culture. He understands rituals of healing as well as the rigors of medical discipline and he respects ancient Native knowledge as well as cutting edge science. He honors the past and knows that the future is what counts. This ability to integrate complex systems—some rooted in spiritual traditional teachings and others in formal medical education and practice—make Dr. Warne a visionary.

As an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, he grew up with the wise counsel and inspiration of numerous relatives who are Lakota medicine men and spiritual leaders, and a mother who is a professor of nursing. These two realms, often suspect of one another, were integrated into his experience as a young man. As a medical practitioner and a spiritual healer, he incorporates into his work the value of both, enhancing each with a greater vision of possibility.

In his medical career, Donald Warne’s accomplishments are comprehensive. He graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine, is a Diplomate of both the American Board of Family Practice and the American Board of Medical Acupuncture and received his Master of Public Health degree from Harvard University. In addition, Dr. Warne completed one-year fellowships in Alternative Medicine from the Arizona Centers for Health and Medicine and Minority Health Policy from Harvard Medical School. He has additional training in medical acupuncture from the UCLA School of Medicine, is a Certified Diabetes Educator, and has studied classical homeopathy and botanical medicine.

~~~~~~~

Donald has worked with the National Institutes of Health to study diabetes intervention in American Indian populations. To this work, he brought his medical, cultural and spiritual experience.

“With diabetes there are no simple solutions, and there are multiple levels at which to work,” says Donald Warne. “There is primary prevention to prevent diabetes from occurring in the first place. Secondary prevention to prevent complications in people who already have the disease. And tertiary prevention to prevent death and/or organ failure in people who already have complications. It’s a daunting task requiring a medical perspective, a public health perspective, a business perspective, an educational perspective, a political perspective, a cultural perspective and a spiritual perspective.”

In the southwest, his work with diabetes prevention links the loss of American Indian agrarian lifestyle, including the loss of the river which was the very heart of a sustainable culture, to the loss of self-identity, self-esteem, self-sufficiency and self-care.

“The old cultures had ceremonies for the harvest, ceremonies to mark the change of season, ceremonies for planting, and ceremonies for rainfall,” he says. “Much of the traditional religion and spiritual practice was based on the river. If you take away the river, you take away a huge portion of the culture.”

The reasons behind the reasons, for diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, are part of his comprehensive perspective. And it is a perspective that infuses all his thinking with layers of insight and connection. It is a way of seeing things that is a direct result of his traditional upbringing and training.

“If we just focus on the physical realm, we will miss most of the issues that people have today,” says Donald Warne. “The most effective way to get to the root of health issues is to incorporate traditional philosophies, which are much more holistic and balanced and which formally address the emotional, mental and spiritual realms in terms of their impact on overall health.”

There is much more to being a healer than merely being a physician focusing on disease processes. Through his insight and experience in his traditional Lakota culture, Donald Warne infuses his formal medical education and practice with a broad and expansive vision of the connections between cultural, societal, community and personal health. He has witnessed first-hand the devastating health effects that occur when this connection is broken.

Donald Warne’s work with implementing culturally relevant medical programs is a model of compassionate and comprehensive healthcare planning that is applicable to many diverse circumstances and situations. His knowledge, passion and dedication to the health and well-being of Native communities offers a lesson in integrative and holistic medicine that attends to the spiritual, emotional and psychological aspects of health as tenderly and as thoroughly as it does to physical well-being.
[ Continues ] http://www.kittyfarmer.com/donald.html
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 20, 2012, 09:37:52 AM
Oglala Lakota Women and Buffalo   4:03   83,680 Views

VIDEO Link:  http://youtu.be/bv1_Yf6vAsc

Uploaded by mihoaida on Sep 17, 2010
For Great Plains Native Americans, Buffalo have meant everything. But in the late 1800s, US government hunted the buffalo almost to the extinction to primarily weaken the North American Natives. In this video, Oglala Lakota women talk about their connection to the buffalo today.

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Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 04, 2012, 07:44:57 AM
The History Channel Club
 
"One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers died this week. George Smith, one of several hundred Navajo soldiers who helped American forces in the Second World War by concealing communications from the Japanese by relaying messages in their native language, died Tuesday, according to the president of the Navajo Nation. Smith was 90.

The Navajo Nation announced it will fly its flag at half-staff until Sunday. Join us in saluting one of the many heroes of World War II."

http://www.thehistorychannelclub.com/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 20, 2012, 08:11:36 AM
http://www.december212012.com/articles/Hopi_Indians/index.shtml

American Indian History
indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com
Relevant American Indian History From Native Perspective - Read Now:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/department/american-indian-history?gclid=CNus5aGvqbQCFQf0nAodDDkA8w

Indian Country  TODAY MEDIA NETWORK.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 20, 2012, 08:21:27 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/article/pro-active-move-rep-ra%C3%BAl-grijalva-next-interior-secretary-146245

A Pro-Active Move for Rep. Raúl Grijalva As Next Interior Secretary

ICTMN Staff
December 11, 2012

In a pro-active move by a coalition of supporters, including American Indian activist Suzan Harjo, a letter was sent to President Barack Obama on December 10, showing strong support for the nomination of Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., as the next Interior Secretary if and when that position opens up.
 
Ken Salazar is the current Interior Secretary, but in a June interview with The Denver Post he was noncommittal about serving a second term if Obama was re-elected. With Obama’s inauguration a little more than a month away, the decision on who will be at the head of the department that oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wild Life Service, among others, is coming into focus.
 
The letter represented the voice of 236 conservation, Hispanic recreation, animal welfare, religious, labor, youth, business and women’s groups, according to a press release issued soon after it was sent.
 
The selection of the next Interior Secretary is “an important moment to place a renewed emphasis and urgency on some of the most critical issues of our age, including climate change, the protection of endangered species and preservation of water and wild lands,” the letter states. "We strongly believe Congressman Grijalva exemplifies the modern and forward-thinking vision of the Department of the Interior.”
 
Salazar, who was at the helm when the BP oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, was criticized by environmentalists and others for his initial handling of the situation, according to The Denver Post.
 
Indian Country Today Media Network reported in August that the Interior Department granted Shell permission to begin preliminary drilling in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska. The announcement was met with trepidation from the likes of the World Wildlife Fund and other environmental organizations.
 
Erich Pica, president of Friends of the Earth, said in the release: “Representative Grijalva has long been an environmental leader on the Natural Resources Committee, and his expertise is just what is needed at the Department of the Interior. For too long the oil, mining and coal interests have been at the helm of the Department of the Interior, but Rep. Grijalva would remake the agency to put the American people before polluters."
 
Grijalva, who is the ranking member and former chairman of the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands, brings a knowledge the coalition feels is needed for the position.
 
“The next Interior Secretary will have a crucial role to play in addressing the growing threat of global warming to national parks, wildlife refuges, public lands, wildlife and all the people who enjoy and depend upon them,” the letter states.
 
As a representative in Arizona since 2003, Grijalva has a working knowledge and relationship with Native American nations within the state on topics such as sacred sites, water rights and more.
 
“Congressman Grijalva has unparalleled expertise with Native Americans and Indian tribes, a strong understanding of border issues, a well-established and pragmatic conservation ethic, and valuable experience with a wide variety of funding challenges. We strongly believe Congressman Grijalva exemplifies the modern and forward thinking vision of the Department of the Interior,” the letter states.
 
Harjo, the Cheyenne & Hodulgee Muscogee president of The Morning Star Institute, said, “Raúl Grijalva has worked with Native American nations and people for many years. He understands what we face as ancient cultural continuums, as governments and as families. He is brilliant, dedicated and effective at protecting our vital natural resources and national heritage. He is perfect for this job.”
 
PHOTO:  A new coalition has written a letter to President Barack Obama in support of Rep. Raúl Grijalva as the next Interior Secretary if and when that position opens up.

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 26, 2013, 08:43:09 AM
Wonderful video. See link below the first photo,
Yowbarb
................................................................................................
http://www.care2.com/news/member/713135843/990027
Kat
- smoothfeather.org

In the spring of 2005, Lakota Spiritual Leader Jim Miller had a dream where he traveled 330 miles on horseback. He eventually came to a river bank in Mankato Minnesota where he saw 38 of his own ancestors hanged...
................................................................................................

(http://www.pipestonestar.com/Images/Stories/HiRes/S24537_P1.jpg)

http://www.pipestonestar.com/Images/Stories/HiRes/S24537_P1.jpg

DAKOTA 38 - Full Movie in HD     1:18:11     84,643 Views

VIDEO LINK:   http://youtu.be/1pX6FBSUyQI

SmoothFeather
Published on Jul 19, 2012
In the spring of 2005, Jim Miller, a Native spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, found himself in a dream riding on horseback across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in United States history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on December 26, 1862. "When you have dreams, you know when they come from the creator... As any recovered alcoholic, I made believe that I didn't get it. I tried to put it out of my mind, yet it's one of those dreams that bothers you night and day."

Now, four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. "We can't blame the wasichus anymore. We're doing it to ourselves. We're selling drugs. We're killing our own people. That's what this ride is about, is healing." This is the story of their journey- the blizzards they endure, the Native and Non-Native communities that house and feed them along the way, and the dark history they are beginning to wipe away.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 26, 2013, 09:08:20 AM
http://theedgeofthevillage.com/2012/12/26/mankato-minnesota-150-years-later/dakota-38/

Photo by David Joles of the Associated Press.
This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 26th, 2012 at 3:28 pm. You can follow any responses to

Photo by David Joles of the Associated Press.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 26th, 2012 at 3:28 pm. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 17, 2013, 07:35:01 AM
Yowbarb Note:   The President supports the birth father and the Native American stand on this situation, a fight over a girl. (I agree; there are enough children to adopt, leave the Native American children alone.)

"The Obama administration is supporting the birth father and the continued use of the ICWA law."

(ICWA =Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.)
...
http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/16/politics/court-cherokee-custody/index.html?hpt=po_c2

Supreme Court tackles Native American adoption dispute
 
By Bill Mears, CNN Supreme Court Producer
updated 7:43 PM EDT, Tue April 16, 2013

Washington (CNN) -- A custody battle involving the "best interests" of a 3-year-old Cherokee girl was taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, an issue spanning the rights of adoptive parents and the desire to preserve Native American families within tribes.

Oral arguments played out in emotional terms, with Justice Anthony Kennedy admitting "domestic relations pose the hardest problems for judges. ... If we could appoint King Solomon, who was the first domestic relations judge, as a special master, we would do it. But we can't."

Several parties have a stake in what happens to this girl: Her biological mother and father, the adoptive parents, the federal government, the Oklahoma-based tribe, and a legal guardian appointed by the state to represent the child's interests.

The appeal was filed by Matt and Melanie Capobianco, who legally adopted Veronica in 2009, shortly after the birth mother agreed to give up the child.

The South Carolina Supreme Court in July ruled for the biological father, Dusten Brown, who had sought custody after the child's birth. He is a registered member of the Cherokee Nation and is raising the child in Oklahoma.

Brown had earlier signed a legal document agreeing to put the girl up for adoption, but his attorneys say he did not understand the extent of the waiver, and that the birth mother misrepresented the child's American Indian heritage to social service workers when the adoption was finalized.

At issue is whether Brown, as the onetime non-custodial father, can gain parental custody, after the non-Indian mother initiated an adoption outside the tribe.

A special congressional law governs such interstate adoptions, since the current 556 federally recognized-tribes all fall under Interior Department oversight, giving those tribes certain unique benefits and rights.

The Capobiancos lawyers say federal law does not define an unwed biological father as a "parent."

While a thin majority may conclude Brown deserves custody, the high court was clearly torn by the conflicting applications of state and federal law.

"If the choice is between a mother, a biological father, or a stranger, and if the father's fit," asked Justice Sonia Sotomayor, "why do you think that the federal statute requires that it be given to a stranger rather than to the biological father when the statute defines 'parent' as the biological father?"

But Chief Justice John Roberts questioned the assertion Brown was initially enthused about becoming a father.

"There is no doubt he paid nothing during the pregnancy and nothing at the time of the birth, to support the child or the mother," he said. "So he was excited by it; he just didn't want to take any responsibility."

The federal law in question is the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, a response to decades of often abusive social service practices that resulted in the separation of large numbers of native youngsters from their families, in many cases to non-Indian homes.

The legislation was designed to "promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and Indian families by the establishment of minimum federal standards to prevent the arbitrary removal of Indian children from their families and tribes and to ensure that measures which prevent the breakup of Indian families are followed in child custody proceedings."

Brown's relationship within the "federally recognized government" of the Cherokee Nation means Veronica is a member of the tribe and subject to its jurisdiction.

"It's not anyone's intent ever to rip a child away from a loving home," said Todd Hembree, the Tahlequah, Oklahoma-based tribe's attorney general. "But we want to make sure those loving homes have the opportunity to be Indian homes first."

As with many custody fights, there is wide factual disagreement over the circumstances of both the couple's breakup and subsequent adoption of the child. Opposing sides even disagree on what legal issues the high court should address.

The Capobiancos think the issue should be about whether the ICWA law can improperly block adoption proceedings voluntarily initiated by a non-Indian mother who had sole custody of her child, due to what the adoptive parents say is the Indian father's failure to establish a legal parent-child relationship under state law.

But Brown argues that he successfully established paternity under state law, and qualifies as a "parent" under the ICWA, thereby giving him proper control and custody of his daughter.

He said in legal papers that the child was conceived when the couple was engaged. But he claims that the biological mother, who claims Hispanic heritage, broke off the now-strained relationship by text message.

He agreed to relinquish his parental rights in exchange for not paying child support, but said the mother never indicated she intended unilaterally to give the child up for adoption.

And Brown claims the biological mother tried to "conceal" his Indian heritage during the adoption process with the Capobiancos, who live in Charleston, South Carolina.

Establishing such heritage would normally make it very difficult for the Cherokee Nation and state social services to agree to any non-Indian adoption and removal from the state. On the flip side, without that designation, state law would have made it hard for Brown to get custody.

By this time, Brown went to Iraq on a one-year deployment in the U.S. Army, making it hard to press his custody claims.

Veronica lived with the Capobiancos for two years before the high court in South Carolina ruled for the father. Brown took his daughter back to Bartlesville, Oklahoma, on New Year's Eve 2011.

The state's top court that ruled in his favor said Brown had "a deeply embedded relationship" with his American Indian heritage, in which Veronica will be raised.

But the Capobiancos point to another part of the state court's conclusion: That despite a ruling against them, they were "ideal parents who have exhibited the ability to provide a loving family environment." That court said its hands were tied, and that federal law trumped state law.

"Our lives have been turned upside down and our home is empty with her," Melanie Capobianco told CNN last month. "What would any parent feel like if their child had been removed out of their home abruptly and with no contact whatsoever? It's unbearable."

In arguments, attorney Lisa Blatt representing the Capobiancos, warned a ruling against her clients would discourage interracial adoption.

"You are relegating adopted parents to go to the back of the bus and wait in line if they want to adopt" a native American child, she said. "And you're basically relegating the child to a piece of property with a sign that says, 'Indian-- keep off. Do not disturb."

Blatt said the father's initial agreement to give up his parental rights meant he forfeited any subsequent efforts to establish custody, when the child was already in a happy, stable home environment.

But several justices questioned her assertion the law's intent to protect against the "breakup of the Indian family" did not apply to a man whose only initial relationship to the girl was one of biology.

"It seems to me he's the father, the other woman's the mother, that's the Indian family" protected under the federal law, said Justice Antonin Scalia. "The father, the mother, and the kid."

Brown's attorney Charles Rothfeld later said state courts made a thorough best interest determination.

Yet some on the bench noted the girl and her biological father were listed in legal documents as being less than 1 percent Cherokee.

"Is it one drop of [Indian] blood that triggers all these extraordinary rights?" asked Roberts.

The Obama administration is supporting the birth father and the continued use of the ICWA law.

As a single mother with two other young children, the biological mother felt she had no choice but to give her daughter up for adoption, said a legal brief filed by her lawyers. They say she complied with the adoption laws in both states and with the tribe.

The couple also says they long wanted to be parents and had seven unsuccessful attempts at in vitro fertilization. She is a child developmental psychologist and he is an automotive body technician.

They were in the room when Veronica was born, and had an "open" adoption, meaning the biological mother could and did maintain a relationship with Veronica.

Both the Capobiancos and Brown attend the court arguments Tuesday but did not acknowledge the other.

Brown told CNN afterward he was looking forward to getting back home to Oklahoma to see his daughter.

"She's asking for me to be there," he said.

Now married to another woman since June, the father says Veronica is in a happy, stable environment in Oklahoma.

His attorney John Nichols said Brown "has done as much as humanely possible to get his daughter and keep her. He wants to raise that child."

The case is Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, a Minor Child Under the Age of Fourteen Years (12-399). A decision is expected in June.
..............................................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 24, 2013, 08:21:47 AM
21 May 2013

Evelyne E. Bradley, 88, American Navajo judge, District Court judge (1984–1995).[29]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deaths_in_2013
.........................
http://www.abqjournal.com/main/2013/05/24/news/retired-navajo-nation-district-court-judge-dies.html

Retired Navajo Nation district court judge dies

By Associated Press on Fri, May 24, 2013
POSTED: 6:13 am


FORT DEFIANCE, Ariz. (AP) — A retired district court judge on the Navajo Nation has died at age 88.

Tribal officials announced Thursday that Evelyne E. Bradley died Tuesday....
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 24, 2013, 08:30:02 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/

Native & American Indian News, Culture, Music, Art and More ...

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/pow-wow 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/pow-wow  POW WOWs listed

Photo Arvel Bird Is Dreaming of 'Many Clans, Many Tribes, One Fire'
To award-winning musician Arvel Bird, Southern Paiute/Métis...
..................
Ancestors Returned to Mother Earth in Michigan
The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan and the...
Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/department/genealogy
...................


Video: Nevada's Indian Territory Exhibit Opens at Reno Airport
On May 3, Washoe, Paiute and Western Shoshone tribal...

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/?gclid=CKr5geWHr7cCFTBo7Aody2kAhw
 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 24, 2013, 09:04:43 AM
PS in the previous post,
I put a photo of a Sugulite Ring by Native American Artist Noah Pfeffer.

His jewelry can be found here:  Garlands Jewelry in Sedona, AZ. http://www.garlandsjewelry.com

Also these earrings made of Sugulite and Turquoise are his creation...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 07, 2013, 12:36:26 PM
Member Priscilla Anacakuyani (Priscilla Bell Lamberty) posted this page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aboriginal-and-Tribal-Nation-News/327603401367

Wonderful photos and very educational... :)
Thanks, Priscilla.
- Yowbarb

................................................
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2013, 03:44:51 PM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/pow-wow


Desecrated Pow Wow Grounds Healing

The sacred Mount McKay Pow Wow Grounds on Fort William...

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/pow-wow
 

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 25, 2013, 10:05:30 PM

...
http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/25/politics/scotus-adoptive-parents/index.html

Adoptive couple wins custody fight       Watch this video
Native American dad loses case

The sharply divided Supreme Court ruled that the adoption did not intrude on the federal rights of the father, a member of the Cherokee tribe. FULL STORY
http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/25/politics/scotus-adoptive-parents/index.html

Washington (CNN) -- The Supreme Court sided on Tuesday with adoptive parents in a divisive custody fight over a Native American child after the biological father asserted his parental rights.

The justices, by a 5-4 margin, said the adoption by a white couple was proper and did not intrude on the federal rights of the father, a registered member of the Cherokee tribe, over where his daughter, Veronica, 3, would live.

The court said the father could not rely on the Indian Child Welfare Act for relief because he never had legal or physical custody at the time of adoption proceedings, which were initiated by the birth mother without his knowledge.

Justice Samuel Alito said when "the adoption of an Indian child is voluntarily and lawfully initiated by a non-Indian parent with sole custodial rights, the (law's) primary goal of preventing unwarranted removal of Indian children and the dissolution of Indian families is not implicated."

The appeal was filed by Matt and Melanie Capobianco, who legally adopted Veronica in 2009 shortly after the birth mother agreed to give up the child.

She is known in court papers as "Baby Girl."

The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled last year for the biological father, Dusten Brown, who had sought custody after Veronica's birth. He is a registered member of the Cherokee Nation and is raising the child in Oklahoma.

The ICWA remains in effect, but the high court majority concluded the biological father could not apply it to his circumstances.

The Supreme Court ruling throws the issue back to the state courts, but it was not clear whether and when Brown would have to turn the girl over to the Capobiancos.

The Charleston, South Carolina, couple said they hope the ruling will prevent disruptions of other adoptions.

"We are very happy with the ruling today. The Supreme Court gave us everything that we asked for," Melanie Capobianco told CNN affiliate WCSC. "They made it very clear that Veronica would have never been taken from her home and from her family and that the adoption would have been approved."

She and Matt Capobianco said separation from Veronica has been difficult.

"We are looking forward to seeing her again soon when we have the opportunity to do so, because we miss her so very much," said Melanie Capobianco.

Christinna Maldanado, Veronica's birth mother, also expressed satisfaction.

"Matt and Melanie are part of my family, and they have treated me like part of theirs. I'm hopeful that we will all be reunited with Veronica very soon," the statement said.

There was no immediate reaction from Brown, or the tribe. But Native American groups remained hopeful he would still keep custody.

"While we are pleased the court has upheld ICWA, we're very disappointed for Dusten, Veronica, and the Brown family that the court has ruled to send the case back to the South Carolina courts on a technicality," said Jefferson Keel, president of the National Congress of American Indians.

"However, the courts in South Carolina have previously affirmed that Dusten Brown is Veronica's father and that he is a fit parent. We are confident that his parental rights will be upheld and that Veronica will stay with her family," Keel said.

The case is Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, a Minor Child Under the Age of Fourteen Years (12-399)
 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 25, 2013, 11:57:27 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/nicwas-terry-cross-defense-dusten-brown-023300981.html

NICWA's Terry Cross: In Defense of Dusten Brown
PR NewswirePR Newswire – Fri, Mar 29, 2013..

PORTLAND, Ore., March 29, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Terry Cross, the executive director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, released the following op-ed.

"He opted to look the other way. He should be absolutely ashamed of his character."
 "He doesn't really care about the child."
                     —Anonymous comments on media coverage of Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl

At the heart of the case Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl is the story of a father who desperately wants to raise his daughter. Dusten Brown is a good father and an honorable man who has found himself in extraordinary circumstances. He is also a parent who has weathered scathing criticism from a public largely miseducated on the facts of the case that brought him into a national spotlight that he never sought.

As followers of this case, what we know to be true can be found in court records. While the public relations firm retained on behalf of Adoptive Couple has been masterful in creating a withering narrative of Brown­—spinning a tale of the deadbeat dad who waited two years before using a "legal loophole" to retrieve his daughter—it is clear that what makes for compelling PR doesn't always bode well for truth or decency.

In reality, court records paint a different portrait of Brown. Stationed at Fort Sill Army Base and engaged to be married when his daughter was conceived, Brown hoped to push his wedding date up so that his military benefits would provide for the mother and his child. Instead, the mother broke the engagement and cut off communication.

Shockingly little has been reported regarding Brown's military status and how it affected his daughter's removal to South Carolina and his subsequent efforts to contest adoption proceedings. In the months just after his daughter's birth, Brown was in the midst of intense pre-deployment preparations. He was being prepared to go to war.

Understanding this, attorneys for Adoptive Couple waited until days before his deployment to Iraq to serve him with notice of their intent to adopt his daughter. The process server threatened Brown with arrest when he questioned the true purpose of the papers he signed. Brown immediately sought legal counsel and took every legal measure he could to stop the attempt to adopt his child. He sought to have his daughter placed with his parents while he was in Iraq, a request staunchly opposed by Adoptive Couple.

Are these the actions of a deadbeat dad?

It took more than a year for Brown to fulfill his obligations to our country, completing his service honorably and admirably. Only upon his return could the adoption hearing occur. When the South Carolina Family Court finally heard the case, it denied Adoptive Couple's petition to adopt. More importantly, the court found that Brown "did not voluntarily consent to the termination of his parental rights or the adoption; and [that Adoptive Couple] failed to prove by clear and convincing evidence that Father's parental rights should be terminated or that granting custody of Baby Girl to Father would likely result in serious emotional or physical damage to Baby Girl."

When these are the facts, why have they been seldom mentioned? This winter, as I followed the case of another military father embroiled in a custody case that closely paralleled the one involving Brown, I often wondered this. In the case, Terry Achane, a U.S. Army drill instructor, won custody of his daughter from a Utah couple after it was revealed that his estranged wife cut off all communication with him while he was deployed and gave the child up for adoption without his consent.

While initially indicating they would fight the ruling, the Utah couple changed their minds. Their attorney explained that because they "love the child deeply and want her to succeed in life, they are willing to put her needs before their own hopes and desires and would rather drop the appeal than risk the child suffering potential psychological and emotional consequences."

The outpouring of support for Achane stands in stark contrast with Brown's treatment in the media. However, the tide is changing. The media has started to dig deeper in its reporting. As they do, more light is shed on Dusten Brown as a father and veteran. I can only hope that once these facts come to light, the same public that has vilified Brown will come to recognize him simply as a man who loves his daughter very much.

Terry Cross is a member of the Seneca Nation and the executive director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association in Portland, Oregon.

Media Contact: Nicole Adams, +1-503-754-0466, nicole@nicwa.org

SOURCE National Indian Child Welfare Association
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 26, 2013, 06:37:23 PM
http://www.postandcourier.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120727/PC16/120729340/1005/&template=artpix

Dusten Brown Native American, who is the biological father of this little girl. He just lost custody of her
to a non Native American couple.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 08, 2013, 11:05:11 AM
Aboriginal and Tribal Nation News

Courageous man frees wolf from fence
 Watch Video - Read Story ===> http://bit.ly/Courageous-man-frees-wolf-from-fence-VIDEO

http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2012/03/courageous-man-frees-wolf-from-fence.html
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 28, 2013, 05:56:56 PM
http://500nations.com/Puerto_Rico_Tribes.asp      8)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on August 28, 2013, 08:49:05 PM
http://500nations.com/Puerto_Rico_Tribes.asp      8)

Thank you Barb for posting this :D

My Ancestors where the first to meet Columbus and his men-- and we are still here contrary to the popular/mainstream belief...

Indigenous Puerto Rico: DNA evidence upsets established history
Read more at:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ictarchives/2003/10/06/indigenous-puerto-rico-dna-evidence-upsets-established-history-89396 (http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ictarchives/2003/10/06/indigenous-puerto-rico-dna-evidence-upsets-established-history-89396)

This is my yukayeke (loosely translated as "village") Guatu Ma Cu (Sacred Fire) in Boriken (Puerto Rico)

(http://www.austinonstage.com/image/prfdanceparty32802.jpg)

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j254/pbutterpaint/5066e087-f6e8-431c-b3cb-8ed05955528c_zpsdb157ef5.jpg)

 ;D
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 29, 2013, 12:05:45 AM
pbutter, this is wonderful information and I really like the images.
Thanks!
 :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 29, 2013, 04:29:35 PM
Quote
pbutter72

Thank you Barb for posting this :D

My Ancestors where the first to meet Columbus and his men-- and we are still here contrary to the popular/mainstream belief...

Indigenous Puerto Rico: DNA evidence upsets established history
Read more at:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ictarchives/2003/10/06/indigenous-puerto-rico-dna-evidence-upsets-established-history-89396

....................................
pbutter72, I like it when that happens!! When people survive in spite of it all! Someone writes they were all killed off but - no!
 :) 
This is wonderful...
Thank You,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on August 29, 2013, 07:18:34 PM
Quote
pbutter72

Thank you Barb for posting this :D

My Ancestors where the first to meet Columbus and his men-- and we are still here contrary to the popular/mainstream belief...

Indigenous Puerto Rico: DNA evidence upsets established history
Read more at:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ictarchives/2003/10/06/indigenous-puerto-rico-dna-evidence-upsets-established-history-89396

....................................
pbutter72, I like it when that happens!! When people survive in spite of it all! Someone writes they were all killed off but - no!
 :) 
This is wonderful...
Thank You,
Yowbarb

Thank you Barb!

The history goes that when the conquistadors invaded the island of Boriken, many Taino fled to the caves in the mountains. The caves were seen as refuge and many stayed on or near the mountains to live...In the mythology of my Ancestors, the First People came out of the caves...

(http://data.whicdn.com/images/62258108/large.jpg)

(http://www.puertoricodaytrips.com/wp-post-images/piedra-escrita-1a.jpg)

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j254/pbutterpaint/taino_petroglyph.jpg)

~pB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 03, 2013, 02:22:49 PM
What a beautiful story of survival!
I love that,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on September 03, 2013, 05:56:01 PM
What a beautiful story of survival!
I love that,
Yowbarb

Thank you :) It is so awesome to continue some of the traditions and herb lore of those who came before you-- their story as well as the stories of other ancient peoples' survival are inspirational and something to learn from.

~pB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 23, 2013, 08:43:54 PM
What a beautiful story of survival!
I love that,
Yowbarb

Thank you :) It is so awesome to continue some of the traditions and herb lore of those who came before you-- their story as well as the stories of other ancient peoples' survival are inspirational and something to learn from.

~pB

pbutter, I agree there is so much to learn from these peoples...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 23, 2013, 08:49:22 PM
Dusten Brown lost his fight for custody of his biological daughter Veronica.
- Yowbarb
...
http://news.yahoo.com/cherokee-child-handed-over-adoptive-parents-012149336.html

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A South Carolina couple who vowed last month to not leave Oklahoma unless they went home with a 4-year-old Cherokee girl they have been trying to adopt since her birth were given custody of the girl Monday night after the Oklahoma Supreme Court said it didn't have jurisdiction over the child.

"She's safely in her parents' arms," said Jessica Munday, a spokeswoman for Matt and Melanie Capobianco, of Charleston, S.C.

Cherokee Nation spokeswoman Amanda Clinton confirmed that Veronica was handed over to the Capobiancos hours after the Oklahoma Supreme Court dissolved a temporary court order leaving the child with her father and his family. Until the Monday night transfer, the Cherokee Nation had insisted the girl would remain with the tribe.

The Capobiancos and the girl's biological father, Dusten Brown, had fought for years over custody of the girl. The dispute has raised questions about jurisdictions, tribal sovereignty and a federal law meant to help keep Native American tribes together.

Veronica, whose biological father is a member of the Cherokee Nation and whose biological mother in not Native American, had lived with the Capobiancos from birth until she was 27 months old, when Brown was awarded custody under the Indian Child Welfare Act. But a U.S. Supreme Court decision later went against Brown, and a South Carolina court finalized the Capobiancos' adoption of the girl earlier this year. Brown had then turned to Oklahoma's courts.

It wasn't known if there were any conditions attached to the Capobiancos gaining custody, including whether Brown would be allowed to visit the girl. An attorney for Brown did not return phone calls seeking comment.

Cherokee Nation Attorney General Todd Hembree released a statement late Monday describing the scene as Veronica's custody was transferred. He said it was emotional but "peaceful and dignified." He said Brown and his wife packed clothes and toys for Veronica before a tribal attorney drove her a short distance to where the Capobiancos were waiting.

"Dusten Brown was just as brave today as we he was when he fought for our country in Iraq," Hembree said. "Although this is not something any parent should ever have to do, we could not be more proud of the dignity and courage with which he carried himself."

Hembree added that Veronica will always be a Cherokee citizen and that he hoped "the Capobiancos honor their word that Dusten will be allowed to remain an important part of Veronica's life."

Munday said she was not sure when Capobiancos planned to return to South Carolina with Veronica, but said she felt they were now free to do that at any time. She said Veronica has spent some time with the couple recently and did remember them.

"It was smooth. There wasn't any danger. ... Hopefully everyone can focus on healing now," said Munday, a friend of the family.
When the Oklahoma justices bowed out, it left in place a South Carolina court order validating the Capobiancos' adoption and a Cherokee Nation tribal court directive that said the girl could remain with family members of Brown while he was undergoing National Guard training.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court had halted the girl's transfer to the Capobiancos while it considered the case. The court did not explain its decision to lift its stay Monday.

After the girl's transfer to the Capobiancos, the National Indian Child Welfare Association put out a statement saying it was saddened by the events.

"The legal system has failed this child and American Indians as well. Our prayers are with everyone concerned, but most of all with Veronica," said Terry Cross, the group's executive director.

Veronica's birth mother was pregnant when she put the girl up for adoption, and the Capobiancos took custody of Veronica shortly after birth.

Brown and his family claim the Indian Child Welfare Act mandates that the child be raised within the Cherokee Nation. The law was passed in 1978 with the intent of reducing the high rates of Native American children being adopted by non-Native American families.

A South Carolina court cited the law when awarding Veronica to Brown in 2011, but the U.S. Supreme Court this year said the law did not apply because he had been absent from the child's life.

Brown also is facing extradition to South Carolina to face a charge of custodial interference for refusing to hand over the girl.
___
Follow Kristi Eaton on Twitter at http://twitter.com/kristieaton.
___
Associated Press writer Meg Kinnard in Columbia, S.C., contributed to this report

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 23, 2013, 09:23:57 PM
I believe the decision may have upheld the letter of the law, while violating the spirit of the law.
The main legal issue which should have taken precedence here: Native Americans are not to be adopted out of the tribe!!
While I sympathize also with the adopted parents, the child should have been allowed to be raised with her tribe. Surprised the Supreme court did not uphold this. President Obama made a statement over a year ago the child should stay with her tribe.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 14, 2013, 04:05:23 AM
Update from Yowbarb: I can't find any news that Dusten Brown, biological father of Veronica Brown, and a member of the Cherokee Nation has been allowed to see his girl. Last I read the adoptive parents tried to sue Dusten Brown for over a million dollars and the Cherokee Nation refused.
Photo below is from Native News Network.

IMHO, that was a really, really bad Supreme Court ruling, which upheld sole custody for the Capobiancos.

These Justices disagreed with the outcome. They were in favor of granting custody of Veronica Brown to her biological father and allowing her to remain with the Cherokee nation.
Therefore they lost and have Dissenting Opinions:   Antonin Scalia and Sotomayor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoptive_Couple_v._Baby_Girl

Adoptive Couple v. Baby GirlFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/image-files/brown-veronica-dusten-national-guard-training.gif

(http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/image-files/brown-veronica-dusten-national-guard-training.gif)
... 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 12, 2014, 10:16:55 AM
On This Day: In 1864 Kit Carson entered Canyon de Chelly in Arizona to force the Navajos to move to the Bosque Redondo Reservation in New Mexico.

Source:  Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources's photo.

https://www.facebook.com/indigenouspeoplesissues
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 12, 2014, 10:33:08 AM
More Canyon de Chelly images

You can download and purchase the originals here:

http://footage.shutterstock.com/clip-1893820-stock-footage-a-woman-sits-on-the-edge-of-a-cliff-at-canyon-de-chelly-in-new-mexico.html

Video  http://footage.shutterstock.com/clip-5305607-stock-footage-life-of-the-american-indian-navajo-in-the-s.html?src=rel/1893820:3
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2014, 10:51:18 AM
Global Moderator pbutter posted this on Facebook so it is in my Newsfeed. Interesting material.
- Yowbarb
... from pbutter:

A very comprehensive list of resources for anyone interested in Taino Culture, the Indigenous People of the the Greater Antilles.
 Hahom Tiao Tomas Baibramael Gonzalez for gathering this information!

Taino 101   https://www.facebook.com/groups/Taino101/permalink/287139218100017/

Attention all new students!!! Mi gente I have added more books and research papers to this list of books please take the time to thumb through the list and pick a book any book. Cause a mind is a terrible thing to waste! Academic & Investigative Research "Boricua Migration to Hawai`i and Meaning of Caribbean Indigenous Resistance, Survival and Presence on the Island of Boriken (Puerto Rico)", edited, by Tony (Akoni) Castanha, Paper Presented at the 1999 World Indigenous Peoples' Conference on Education, Hilo, Hawai`i, August 1-7, 1999.

 Rouse, Irving, "The Tainos: Rise and Decline of the People Who Greeted Columbus," Yale University Press, 1992. (Great history book for the archeology lover.) [Book]

 Dr. Lynne Guitar, "Documenting the Myth of Taino Extinction", KACIKE: Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology. Special Issue: NEW DIRECTIONS IN TAINO RESEARCH, 2002.

 Surviving Columbus in Puerto Rico: the myth of extinction, Editorial in Indian Country Today, 06 October, 2003.

 "The New Old World: Antilles Living Beyond the Myth," Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, 2002.

 Ricardo Alegria, "History of the Indians of Puerto Rico," Editorial Collection de Estudios Puertorriquenos, 1970.

 A Note on Tainos: Whither Progress? Jose Barreiro, Northeast Indian Quarterly, pp. 66-77 Fall, 1990

 Dr. Lynne Guitar, "New Notes about Taino Music and its Influence on Contemporary Dominican Life", ICAS, Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies.
 ESTUDIO DEL GENOMA TAINO Y GUANCHE PUERTO RICO

History

 Baralt, Guillermo A., "Buena Vista: Life and Work on a Puerto Rican Hacienda, 1833-1904", University of North Carolina Press, 1999. (Detailed history on Ponce and this hacienda, great historic pictures!) [book]

 Buitrago Ortiz, Carlos, "Esperanza; an ethnographic study of a peasant community in Puerto Rico", Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, University of Arizona Press, 1973. (Written several decades ago, enjoyable narration of observations made of the traditions and everyday life of a humble farming community.) [Book]

 Ronald Fernandez, Serafin Mendez Mendez, and Gail Cueto, "Puerto Rico Past and Present". Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998. (Fat encyclopedia gives broad overviews on 500 years of history, politics, economics, and culture.) [Book]

 Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "Puerto Rico: An Interpretive History from Pre-Columbian Times to 1900," Markus Wiener Pub., 1998. (Great history book.) [Book]

 Kal Wagenheim, "Puerto Rico: A Profile", Praeger Publishers, New York NY, 1970.[Book]

 Morales Carrion, Arturo, "Puerto Rico: A Political and Cultural History," W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1983. (Could not put this one down. Learned much I never knew!) [Book]

 Scarano, Francisco A., "Sugar and Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850," The University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. (Amazing details on life on a sugar plantation.) [Book]

 Wagenheim, Kal and Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History," Markus Wiener Pub., 1996. (A facinating book and one of my favorites! Presents history in the words of those who were there.) [Book]

 Scarano, Francisco A., "Sugar and Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850," The University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. (Amazing details on life on a sugar plantation.) [Book]

 Wagenheim, Kal and Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History," Markus Wiener Pub., 1996. (A facinating book and one of my favorites! Presents history in the words of those who were there.) [Book]

 Sarcano, Francisco, "Puerto Rico: Una Historia Contemporanea," McGraw-Hill, 1999.

News & Media Features

 El Taino Vive El Nuevo Dia, November 2010. Was a special online feature, the link is now broken.

 Tainos - La Ultima Tribu: An awesome movie that asks the question, what if...what if Tainos still lived in the Mountains of Puerto Rico. Action, adventure, see it again and again! At the time of this writing, Cineisla.com had the movie for sale.

News Links by The Voice of the Taino People
 Our Ancestor's bones are rising from the earth - ancient Taino sites unearthing around the Island! (2007/08)

 Proyecto Arceologico del Barrio Quemado, Mayaguez
 Archaeological site offers peek into Puerto Rico's past, Orlando Sentinel, Oct 2007.

 Major pre-Columbian archaeological site found near Ponce:
 Associated Press Story on Newsvine.com w Photos
 Associated Press Story on MSNBC w/ Photos

 National Geographic News w/ Photo
 El Vocero (Puerto Rico)
 Univision Blogspot
 Don Jibaro's Spin w/ Photos

 Mitochondrial DNA (MTDNA) Research

 The Use of Mitochondrial DNA to Discover Pre-Columbian Migrations to the Caribbean: Results for Puerto Rico and Expectations for the Dominican Republic , Dr. Juan Carlos Martinez Cruzado, KACIKE: The Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology [On-line Journal], Special Issue, Lynne Guitar, Ed., 2002.

 Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals substantial Native American ancestry in Puerto Rico , Dr. Juan Carlos Martinez Cruzado, et. al, Hum Biol. 2001 Aug;73(4):491-511.

 Indigenous Puerto Rico: DNA evidence upsets established history , Rick Kerns, Indian Country Today, October 06, 2003

 An Interview On the Taino DNA testing in Puerto Rico Of Juan Carlos Martinez, Delware Review of Latin American Studies, "Profiles", Vol. 1, no. 2, 15 August 2000.

 Melba Rerrer, "UPR study finds high Taino DNA rate: Tests contradict theory of extinction of P.R. natives," San Juan Star, Sunday 18 April 1999.

 The Use of Mitochondrial DNA to Discover Pre-Columbian Migrations to the Caribbean: Results for Puerto Rico and Expectations for the Dominican Republic

 Amerindian mtDNA in Puerto Rico: When does DNA matter? Jorge Estevez, The CAC (Caribbean Amerindian Central) Review, June 1, 2008

 Recent Research Contributions of Genetics to the Studies of Population History and Anthropology in Puerto Rico, Delaware Review of Latin American Studies, Profiles Vol. 1 No. 2 August 15, 2000.

 Prof. Juan Caros Martinez Cruzado, Lecture: Herencia Indigena Biologico de Puerto Rico, Jayuya PR 2009: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5.

 Mi gente, welcome to Taino 101, the school of hard knocks. It's time to open your books, pick up your pencils and take down some notes. The following information is a list of books and papers that you should consider reading and studying in order to graduate from this prestigious institution of higher learning, lol. The curriculum will includes history, culture, current events with a healthy helping of spirituality. No time to waste most of these books can be found and ordered on line from Amazon and Book Finders. Both new and used copies. Many of the research papers can be found on line by Googling the titles and don't forget the public libraries.
 Remember to always check in on Taino 101 and to pick a thread any thread that interest you and always ask questions. We have many members on our page that can give you answers and different prospectives on the material that you chose to read and study.
 May the spirits of our ancestors guide and help lead you towards the right direction.

 Baibramael

 The Chronicals

 Fray Bartolome de Las Casas, "Historia de Las Indias (Tomo I-III)", Madrid, 1929 (3 Volume Set).
 Bartolome de Las Casas, "Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies (1542)". Translated by Nigel Griffin. Penguin Classics; 1st ed edition (September 8, 1999).

 Fray Ramon Pane, "An Account of the Antiquities of the Indians", A new edition with an introductory study, notes, and appendixes by Joshua Arrom, translated by Susan C. Griswold, Duke University Press, Durham & London 1999.

 Angel Rodriguez Ph.D (Editor), "Mitologia Taina o Eyeri. Ramon Pane y la Relacion sobre las Antigueades de los Indios: El primer tratado etnografico hecho en America, edicion bilingue ... del siglo XVI." (Spanish and Italian Edition), Editorial Nuevo Mundo, January 2008. Classic must read

 Stevens-Arroyo, Antonio M., Cave of the Jaguar: The Mythological World of the Tainos, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1988.

 Bartolome de las Casas, "A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies." Project Gutenberg Ebook.

 Maria Poviones-Bishop, "The Bat and the Guava: Life and Death in the Taino Worldview," Kislak Foundation ebook,, July 30th, 2001.

 Pre-Taino Ancestors & Amazon Indigenous Cultures

 William F. Keegan, Archaic Influences in the Origins and Development of the Taino societies.Caribbean Journey of Science, Vol. 42, No. 1,1-10, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, 2006.

 Reniel Rodriguez Ramos, "From the Guanahatabey to the Archaic of Puerto Rico: The Nonevident Evidence." Ethnohistory Summer 2008, Volume 55, Number 3: 393-415, 2008.

 "Indian Cultures from Around the World: Yanomamo Indians." Hands Around the World. 8 Apr. 2010.

 For Children

 Adorno, Calixta V., "Juegos Infantiles De Puerto Rico", University of Puerto Rico Press, June 1991. (Beloved songs and games we learned as children.) [Book]

 Foley, Erin, "Puerto Rico (Festivals of the World)". Gareth Stevens, 1997. Cute book (nice photos, not too much detail) that focuses on some of the celebrations that take place in Puerto Rico throughout the year. Ages 4-8. [Book]

 Green, Y., "Marisol from Puerto Rico Sticker Paper Doll", Dover Pubns, Oct 1998. (Remember paper dolls? Marisol comes with traditional costumes of Puerto Rico. Really cute tiny book and only 80 cents!) [Tiny Book]
 Levy, Patricia Marjorie, "Puerto Rico (Cultures of the World)", Times Books International, Times Editions Pte Ltd., 1995. (Great book for middle-school age, covers a little bit of everything, geography, history and culture. Lots of color pictures!) [Book]

 Milivojevic, Joann, "Ticket to Puerto Rico", Carolrhoda Books, 2000. (Another great book for preschool and young elementary age, covers a little bit of everything, geography, history and culture. Lots of color pictures!) [Book]

 Ramirez-Rivera, Jose, "Los Cuentos de Juan Bobo", Mass Market Paperback, 1979. (10 famous childrens' stories about this favorite Puerto Rican folk character who is always getting into silly misadventures.) [Book]

 Atariba & Niguayona: A Story from the Taino People of Puerto Rico (Tales of the Americas  (English and Spanish Edition) [Hardcover]
 Harriet Rohmer (Author), Jesus Guerrero Rea (Author), Consuelo Mendez Castillo (Illustrator)

 How the Sea Began: A Taino Myth [Hardcover]
 George L. Crespo (Author)

 The Golden Flower: A Taino Myth from Puerto Rico [Hardcover]
 Nina Jaffe (Author), Enrique O. Sanchez (Illustrator)

Like · Share · January 28 at 6:42am · Edited


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on March 26, 2014, 05:37:40 PM
Global Moderator pbutter posted this on Facebook so it is in my Newsfeed. Interesting material.
- Yowbarb
... from pbutter:

A very comprehensive list of resources for anyone interested in Taino Culture, the Indigenous People of the the Greater Antilles.
 Hahom Tiao Tomas Baibramael Gonzalez for gathering this information!

Taino 101   https://www.facebook.com/groups/Taino101/permalink/287139218100017/

Attention all new students!!! Mi gente I have added more books and research papers to this list of books please take the time to thumb through the list and pick a book any book. Cause a mind is a terrible thing to waste! Academic & Investigative Research "Boricua Migration to Hawai`i and Meaning of Caribbean Indigenous Resistance, Survival and Presence on the Island of Boriken (Puerto Rico)", edited, by Tony (Akoni) Castanha, Paper Presented at the 1999 World Indigenous Peoples' Conference on Education, Hilo, Hawai`i, August 1-7, 1999.

 Rouse, Irving, "The Tainos: Rise and Decline of the People Who Greeted Columbus," Yale University Press, 1992. (Great history book for the archeology lover.) [Book]

 Dr. Lynne Guitar, "Documenting the Myth of Taino Extinction", KACIKE: Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology. Special Issue: NEW DIRECTIONS IN TAINO RESEARCH, 2002.

 Surviving Columbus in Puerto Rico: the myth of extinction, Editorial in Indian Country Today, 06 October, 2003.

 "The New Old World: Antilles Living Beyond the Myth," Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, 2002.

 Ricardo Alegria, "History of the Indians of Puerto Rico," Editorial Collection de Estudios Puertorriquenos, 1970.

 A Note on Tainos: Whither Progress? Jose Barreiro, Northeast Indian Quarterly, pp. 66-77 Fall, 1990

 Dr. Lynne Guitar, "New Notes about Taino Music and its Influence on Contemporary Dominican Life", ICAS, Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies.
 ESTUDIO DEL GENOMA TAINO Y GUANCHE PUERTO RICO

History

 Baralt, Guillermo A., "Buena Vista: Life and Work on a Puerto Rican Hacienda, 1833-1904", University of North Carolina Press, 1999. (Detailed history on Ponce and this hacienda, great historic pictures!) [book]

 Buitrago Ortiz, Carlos, "Esperanza; an ethnographic study of a peasant community in Puerto Rico", Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, University of Arizona Press, 1973. (Written several decades ago, enjoyable narration of observations made of the traditions and everyday life of a humble farming community.) [Book]

 Ronald Fernandez, Serafin Mendez Mendez, and Gail Cueto, "Puerto Rico Past and Present". Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998. (Fat encyclopedia gives broad overviews on 500 years of history, politics, economics, and culture.) [Book]

 Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "Puerto Rico: An Interpretive History from Pre-Columbian Times to 1900," Markus Wiener Pub., 1998. (Great history book.) [Book]

 Kal Wagenheim, "Puerto Rico: A Profile", Praeger Publishers, New York NY, 1970.[Book]

 Morales Carrion, Arturo, "Puerto Rico: A Political and Cultural History," W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1983. (Could not put this one down. Learned much I never knew!) [Book]

 Scarano, Francisco A., "Sugar and Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850," The University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. (Amazing details on life on a sugar plantation.) [Book]

 Wagenheim, Kal and Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History," Markus Wiener Pub., 1996. (A facinating book and one of my favorites! Presents history in the words of those who were there.) [Book]

 Scarano, Francisco A., "Sugar and Slavery in Puerto Rico: The Plantation Economy of Ponce, 1800-1850," The University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. (Amazing details on life on a sugar plantation.) [Book]

 Wagenheim, Kal and Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga, "The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History," Markus Wiener Pub., 1996. (A facinating book and one of my favorites! Presents history in the words of those who were there.) [Book]

 Sarcano, Francisco, "Puerto Rico: Una Historia Contemporanea," McGraw-Hill, 1999.

News & Media Features

 El Taino Vive El Nuevo Dia, November 2010. Was a special online feature, the link is now broken.

 Tainos - La Ultima Tribu: An awesome movie that asks the question, what if...what if Tainos still lived in the Mountains of Puerto Rico. Action, adventure, see it again and again! At the time of this writing, Cineisla.com had the movie for sale.

News Links by The Voice of the Taino People
 Our Ancestor's bones are rising from the earth - ancient Taino sites unearthing around the Island! (2007/08)

 Proyecto Arceologico del Barrio Quemado, Mayaguez
 Archaeological site offers peek into Puerto Rico's past, Orlando Sentinel, Oct 2007.

 Major pre-Columbian archaeological site found near Ponce:
 Associated Press Story on Newsvine.com w Photos
 Associated Press Story on MSNBC w/ Photos

 National Geographic News w/ Photo
 El Vocero (Puerto Rico)
 Univision Blogspot
 Don Jibaro's Spin w/ Photos

 Mitochondrial DNA (MTDNA) Research

 The Use of Mitochondrial DNA to Discover Pre-Columbian Migrations to the Caribbean: Results for Puerto Rico and Expectations for the Dominican Republic , Dr. Juan Carlos Martinez Cruzado, KACIKE: The Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology [On-line Journal], Special Issue, Lynne Guitar, Ed., 2002.

 Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals substantial Native American ancestry in Puerto Rico , Dr. Juan Carlos Martinez Cruzado, et. al, Hum Biol. 2001 Aug;73(4):491-511.

 Indigenous Puerto Rico: DNA evidence upsets established history , Rick Kerns, Indian Country Today, October 06, 2003

 An Interview On the Taino DNA testing in Puerto Rico Of Juan Carlos Martinez, Delware Review of Latin American Studies, "Profiles", Vol. 1, no. 2, 15 August 2000.

 Melba Rerrer, "UPR study finds high Taino DNA rate: Tests contradict theory of extinction of P.R. natives," San Juan Star, Sunday 18 April 1999.

 The Use of Mitochondrial DNA to Discover Pre-Columbian Migrations to the Caribbean: Results for Puerto Rico and Expectations for the Dominican Republic

 Amerindian mtDNA in Puerto Rico: When does DNA matter? Jorge Estevez, The CAC (Caribbean Amerindian Central) Review, June 1, 2008

 Recent Research Contributions of Genetics to the Studies of Population History and Anthropology in Puerto Rico, Delaware Review of Latin American Studies, Profiles Vol. 1 No. 2 August 15, 2000.

 Prof. Juan Caros Martinez Cruzado, Lecture: Herencia Indigena Biologico de Puerto Rico, Jayuya PR 2009: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5.

 Mi gente, welcome to Taino 101, the school of hard knocks. It's time to open your books, pick up your pencils and take down some notes. The following information is a list of books and papers that you should consider reading and studying in order to graduate from this prestigious institution of higher learning, lol. The curriculum will includes history, culture, current events with a healthy helping of spirituality. No time to waste most of these books can be found and ordered on line from Amazon and Book Finders. Both new and used copies. Many of the research papers can be found on line by Googling the titles and don't forget the public libraries.
 Remember to always check in on Taino 101 and to pick a thread any thread that interest you and always ask questions. We have many members on our page that can give you answers and different prospectives on the material that you chose to read and study.
 May the spirits of our ancestors guide and help lead you towards the right direction.

 Baibramael

 The Chronicals

 Fray Bartolome de Las Casas, "Historia de Las Indias (Tomo I-III)", Madrid, 1929 (3 Volume Set).
 Bartolome de Las Casas, "Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies (1542)". Translated by Nigel Griffin. Penguin Classics; 1st ed edition (September 8, 1999).

 Fray Ramon Pane, "An Account of the Antiquities of the Indians", A new edition with an introductory study, notes, and appendixes by Joshua Arrom, translated by Susan C. Griswold, Duke University Press, Durham & London 1999.

 Angel Rodriguez Ph.D (Editor), "Mitologia Taina o Eyeri. Ramon Pane y la Relacion sobre las Antigueades de los Indios: El primer tratado etnografico hecho en America, edicion bilingue ... del siglo XVI." (Spanish and Italian Edition), Editorial Nuevo Mundo, January 2008. Classic must read

 Stevens-Arroyo, Antonio M., Cave of the Jaguar: The Mythological World of the Tainos, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1988.

 Bartolome de las Casas, "A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies." Project Gutenberg Ebook.

 Maria Poviones-Bishop, "The Bat and the Guava: Life and Death in the Taino Worldview," Kislak Foundation ebook,, July 30th, 2001.

 Pre-Taino Ancestors & Amazon Indigenous Cultures

 William F. Keegan, Archaic Influences in the Origins and Development of the Taino societies.Caribbean Journey of Science, Vol. 42, No. 1,1-10, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, 2006.

 Reniel Rodriguez Ramos, "From the Guanahatabey to the Archaic of Puerto Rico: The Nonevident Evidence." Ethnohistory Summer 2008, Volume 55, Number 3: 393-415, 2008.

 "Indian Cultures from Around the World: Yanomamo Indians." Hands Around the World. 8 Apr. 2010.

 For Children

 Adorno, Calixta V., "Juegos Infantiles De Puerto Rico", University of Puerto Rico Press, June 1991. (Beloved songs and games we learned as children.) [Book]

 Foley, Erin, "Puerto Rico (Festivals of the World)". Gareth Stevens, 1997. Cute book (nice photos, not too much detail) that focuses on some of the celebrations that take place in Puerto Rico throughout the year. Ages 4-8. [Book]

 Green, Y., "Marisol from Puerto Rico Sticker Paper Doll", Dover Pubns, Oct 1998. (Remember paper dolls? Marisol comes with traditional costumes of Puerto Rico. Really cute tiny book and only 80 cents!) [Tiny Book]
 Levy, Patricia Marjorie, "Puerto Rico (Cultures of the World)", Times Books International, Times Editions Pte Ltd., 1995. (Great book for middle-school age, covers a little bit of everything, geography, history and culture. Lots of color pictures!) [Book]

 Milivojevic, Joann, "Ticket to Puerto Rico", Carolrhoda Books, 2000. (Another great book for preschool and young elementary age, covers a little bit of everything, geography, history and culture. Lots of color pictures!) [Book]

 Ramirez-Rivera, Jose, "Los Cuentos de Juan Bobo", Mass Market Paperback, 1979. (10 famous childrens' stories about this favorite Puerto Rican folk character who is always getting into silly misadventures.) [Book]

 Atariba & Niguayona: A Story from the Taino People of Puerto Rico (Tales of the Americas  (English and Spanish Edition) [Hardcover]
 Harriet Rohmer (Author), Jesus Guerrero Rea (Author), Consuelo Mendez Castillo (Illustrator)

 How the Sea Began: A Taino Myth [Hardcover]
 George L. Crespo (Author)

 The Golden Flower: A Taino Myth from Puerto Rico [Hardcover]
 Nina Jaffe (Author), Enrique O. Sanchez (Illustrator)

Like · Share · January 28 at 6:42am · Edited

Thank you for reposting!

The story of the Taino, like many Indigenous peoples all over the world, is about survival. After the initial bloody contact with the conquistadors, the natives fled to the mountains where some their descendants live to this day.

Many of Taino words also survived and used in everyday English:

barbecue
canoe
potato
cannibal
Caribbean
cassava
Cuba
guava
hammock
hurricane
iguana
Jamaica
maize
manatee
papaya
savannah
tobacco
yucca

(http://www.tampabay.com/resources/images/dti/rendered/2012/06/LAT_CAVESNEW062412_227261a_8col.jpg)cave near Arecibo, Puerto Rico
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 06, 2014, 09:30:30 AM

Thank you for reposting!

The story of the Taino, like many Indigenous peoples all over the world, is about survival. After the initial bloody contact with the conquistadors, the natives fled to the mountains where some their descendants live to this day.

Many of Taino words also survived and used in everyday English:

barbecue
canoe
potato
cannibal
Caribbean
cassava
Cuba
guava
hammock
hurricane
iguana
Jamaica
maize
manatee
papaya
savannah
tobacco
yucca

(http://www.tampabay.com/resources/images/dti/rendered/2012/06/LAT_CAVESNEW062412_227261a_8col.jpg)cave near Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Wow, pbutter! I had no idea at all those were Taino words! That is so great!
 :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on May 06, 2014, 09:45:16 AM
Thank you- it is a testament to Human Survival!
 ;)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on May 06, 2014, 10:08:53 AM
Hi Everyone!
I found this-- great for the kids!

*source http://www.powwows.com/2014/04/03/indigenous-owned-game-company-to-release-game-based-on-inupiat/#ixzz2xpW79L1p (http://www.powwows.com/2014/04/03/indigenous-owned-game-company-to-release-game-based-on-inupiat/#ixzz2xpW79L1p)

Indigenous Owned Game Company to Release Game Based on Iñupiat

"Never Alone is the first title from Upper One Games, a studio formed last year by Native American developers. It’s a puzzle-platform game based on generations of Alaskan folklore and sees a young girl exploring and surviving harsh snowy environments."

This seems like a interesting way to teach children about another culture, adds the element of survival and promotes problem solving-- besides, the story boards look beautiful-- I think it beats some of the hyper violent and lewd games so popular these days. I plan to get this for my boys, can't wait til it comes out :)

(http://neveralonegame.com/images/screen5.jpg)

~pB

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 07, 2014, 05:27:46 AM
That's really awesome and beautiful!
 :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 19, 2014, 05:40:57 AM
This is from one of my Facebook friends. She did not ask me to post this here but here it is:

If anyone would like to order my book of poems that will be turned into songs for Two Nation's soundtrack, please let me know. The book is $25.00, and the shipping and handling is included in that price. You can order it through paypal by sending the funds to rubyleewhitehurst@gmail.com. The book will be sent directly to you.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 24, 2014, 10:25:06 AM
Yowbarb Note: This story in which a Native American girl was handed to adoptive white parents still brings tears to my eyes. There is no doubt in my mind the adoptive parents love the girl I feel the girl is fairly happy with them. There should never have been an adoption, out of her tribe, NO WAY!!
The only dissenting opinions on the Supreme Court were Sotomayor and Scalia. I surely do not agree with Scalia much but in this case I do. The majority won, though and the girl was handed over to the white couple and I do not think Dusten Brown even has visitation rights...I could find no updates more recent than October of last year...
...

http://www.abcnews4.com/story/23543194/dusten-brown-speaks-for-1st-time-since-handover-of-veronica
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Aldwyn on June 24, 2014, 01:40:42 PM
At least as far as that case went, the father (50% American Indian) didn't have anything to do with the daughter (he was unwilling to support the child by any means) and signed off all parental rights (in a court document).  When the mother (100% white) decided to put the child up for adoption she went into the normal batch of children for adoption not through the American Indian process because the mother was white.  If the father had wanted that little girl to have any idea about her heritage then perhaps taking an interest in the life should have been done before the child was two years old.  Little side note about the case, the tribe forced the trials and litigation, and he was still not interested.  Being in Oklahoma, we got more of the story and frankly that little girl is probably better off the way things turned out.
Aldwyn
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 25, 2014, 08:08:18 PM
At least as far as that case went, the father (50% American Indian) didn't have anything to do with the daughter (he was unwilling to support the child by any means) and signed off all parental rights (in a court document).  When the mother (100% white) decided to put the child up for adoption she went into the normal batch of children for adoption not through the American Indian process because the mother was white.  If the father had wanted that little girl to have any idea about her heritage then perhaps taking an interest in the life should have been done before the child was two years old.  Little side note about the case, the tribe forced the trials and litigation, and he was still not interested.  Being in Oklahoma, we got more of the story and frankly that little girl is probably better off the way things turned out.
Aldwyn

Aldwyn maybe you have different sources of info, and to each his own opinion but she was part of that tribe and as such should not have been adopted out. Had the father and his family been properly notified (according to what he stated) someone in his family or he himself would have kept the girl.
Also he had served in the military.
The Oklahoma Supreme Court put a stay on the adoption but it was overturned by the Federal Supreme court.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoptive_Couple_v._Baby_Girl

- Barb Townsend
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 14, 2014, 01:33:35 PM
Jingle - 2014 Manito Ahbee Pow Wow - PowWows.com  2:43   19 views

Video Link:  http://youtu.be/CMAAJmQcSmw

Published on Oct 13, 2014
View More Pow Wow Videos on Pow Wow TV!
http://tv.powwows.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 14, 2014, 01:45:24 PM
Grand Entry - Manito Ahbee Powwow 2014   21:59   473 Views

Video Link:  http://youtu.be/BIF0QSFV7Mw
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 22, 2014, 11:15:06 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 07, 2015, 04:30:19 PM
Yowbarb Note: Posting this First Nations anti fracking movement news here. Truth B told I am not sure what the current situation is. Will be posting an update soon.
First:  One video. There is a whole collection of these videos by MountainMan23's Channel. 
.............................................
Video:
Clash between shale gas protestors & RCMP.    4:02   4,388

Darcey McLaughlin  Oct 17, 2013
LINK:   http://youtu.be/cjfMx-qf2wY?list=PLME6f2IYaNXsgGwjT8mWG_RRxoSQNT7Ho
...............................................................................................................

http://www.tworowtimes.com/news/national/frack-elsipogtog-first-nation-announces-major-land-reclamation-ongoing-anti-fracking-struggle/

“FRACK OFF!” Elsipogtog First Nation announces major land reclamation in ongoing anti-fracking struggle

Posted by Steve da Silva
Date: October 09, 2013  in: National  1004 Views
 
After months of arrests and mounting resistance against shale gas exploration in New Brunswick on Mi’kmaq territory, the anti-fracking movement upped the ante this past week with a fresh blockade and a proclamation of a massive land reclamation, which has forced conservative New Brunswick Premier David Alward to a negotiation table with representatives of the anti-fracking movement.

A day after the September 30 blockade was established on Route 134 that blocked the entrance to an equipment storage site of SWN Resources Canada, Chief Aaron Sock, speaking for Chief and Council of the Elsipogtog First Nation, announced a sweeping Mi’kmaq land reclamation effective immediately.

“Harper and the Conservative government have lifted restrictions to environmental protections of our lands and water” and “the provincial government is turning over all lands… to a corporation for their own benefit… we have lost confidence in governments for the safekeeping of our lands.”

Sock added that “our notice of eviction has been completely ignored by the Provincial government and Southwest Energy, and… we have been compelled to act to save our water, land and animals from ruin.”

“Let it be known to all the we as the chief and council of Elsipogtog are reclaiming all unoccupied reserve lands… We have been instructed by our people that they are ready, willing, and able to go out and stake their own claims on all unoccupied lands for their own use and benefit.”
...
Related Articles
Message to Elsipogtog, from Kahnesatake October 18, 2013
Mi’kmaq warriors arrested in ongoing movement against… September 25, 2013
Members of Mi’kmaq Warrior Society Swarmed by RCMP in… September 18, 2013
Anti-Fracking Actions Erupt in support of Elsipogtog December 5, 2013
MOHAWK NATION AT KAHNAWÀ:KE STAND IN SUPPORT OF MI’KMAQ… October 23, 2013
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 07, 2015, 04:41:05 PM
I hope First nations is still winning the battle agains the oil interests on the land. - Yowbarb
...
Supreme Court of Canada Makes Historical Ruling on First Nations Land Claims  2:37

Published on Jun 26, 2014

It's a historic day for Canada's First Nations. Canada's highest court granted aboriginal land title to more than 1,700 square kilometers of land to the Tsilhqot'in First Nations. This gives the Tsilhqot'in more authority over their entire territory, and not just individual reserves. The ruling could prove to be a game changer for resource development in B.C. and put a kink in plans for the Northern Gateway Pipeline.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 07, 2015, 05:22:27 PM
OK now THIS should give a pretty good update from First Nations. Their you tube playlist. Posting one of their videos from last summer.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLswN9J1jF0k1mkzx_C9-YKFAwKKqtgcPV  Playlist

Indigenous Occupy: Why We Should All Be Idle No More 4:59

LINK:  http://youtu.be/yU0pTM1rdc4?list=PLswN9J1jF0k1mkzx_C9-YKFAwKKqtgcPV

Published on Jan 13, 2013
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on February 08, 2015, 06:17:36 PM
Hello Everyone!

Here is an article about another protest against the Keystone Pipeline in Lancaster, Pa last month led by some Native elders:

"Opposition to the pipeline is homegrown and strong"

http://lancasteronline.com/opinion/columnists/opposition-to-the-pipeline-is-homegrown-and-strong/article_1a881e9c-9db5-11e4-a732-cfb961f600c0.html#.VLpbUclmMmY.facebook (http://lancasteronline.com/opinion/columnists/opposition-to-the-pipeline-is-homegrown-and-strong/article_1a881e9c-9db5-11e4-a732-cfb961f600c0.html#.VLpbUclmMmY.facebook)

(http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/lancasteronline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/bc/6bcb4306-9db5-11e4-a53c-eb0eaa84c62e/54b9661f72f63.image.jpg?resize=760%2C375)

Kudos to these Warriors!

~pB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 08, 2015, 09:50:13 PM
pbutter - wonderful image. They sure are fighting the good fight...
Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 08, 2015, 10:22:15 PM
Young Biisinai @ West Bay New Years PowWow 2015   3:18    330 views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/uJMfO7a6Flo

Published on Jan 1, 2015
MerenceJ Wemigwanz
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on February 09, 2015, 11:26:38 PM
Thank you YowBarb and thank you for posting this link to the video!

It is always nice to see the younger Generation take part and continue the culture!

 :)

Blessings
~pB

:)  Thanks pB and so true -  it's a good thing seeing young kids learning the culture of their forebears.
While I cannot claim NA ancestry (feel it, but don't know) it warms my heart seeing the culture stay alive...  Images from 2010 parade in San Diego.
Yb
...
http://www.californiaindianeducation.org/pow_wow/powwow_classes.html

http://www.californiaindianeducation.org/soaring_eagles/2010/mlk_parade.html

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 17, 2015, 01:10:21 PM
Thank you YowBarb and thank you for posting this link to the video!

It is always nice to see the younger Generation take part and continue the culture!

 :)

Blessings
~pB

i posted in your post by mistake...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 17, 2015, 01:12:31 PM
Thank you YowBarb and thank you for posting this link to the video!

It is always nice to see the younger Generation take part and continue the culture!

 :)

Blessings
~pB

pbutter72 -  :) here's more little ones dancing in a Pow Wow, as young as they are, feeling a part of it all... Being part of the culture of their ancestors. Being a part of their community.
...Celebrating Life, 24th Annual Pow wow      0:37

Video link: http://youtu.be/8IXhVxhO-qw

Central Michigan University   

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on March 12, 2015, 08:37:39 AM
http://www.theeventchronicle.com/author/admin/

Inuit Elders tell NASA Earth Axis Shifted

The sky has changed, claim Inuit elders
The Inuit elders note climate change in the melting glaciers, deterioration of sealskin, and burns on seals, and disappearing sea ice. The attribute these changes in climate to changes in the sky.The tribal elders claim that the sun no longer rises where it used to rise. The days heat up more quickly and last longer. The stars and moon are also in different places in the sky and this affects the temperatures. This is a population that relies on the placement of the moon and stars for their survival as they live in total darkness during part of the year.
The elders say they can no longer predict the weather, as they have been able to in the past. They observe that warmer winds are changing the snow banks, making their ability to navigate overland more difficult. Polar bear populations are increasing, which causes the bears to wander into the Inuit neighborhoods.
What scientists report
On April 20, 2011, CNN News reported that an earthquake moved the main island of Japan by 8 feet and shifted the Earth on its axis. They quoted Kenneth Hudnut, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, as saying, “At this point, we know that one GPS station moved (8 feet), and we have seen a map from GSI (Geospatial Information Authority) in Japan showing the pattern of shift over a large area is consistent with about that much shift of the land mass.”
They quoted the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy, that estimated that “the 8.9-magnitude quake shifted the planet on its axis by nearly 4 inches (10 centimeters).” Astronomers concur that there has not been a shift in the earth’s rotational axis, but that there have been subtle polar shifts over the last ten years. This is a change in what is called the figure axis.
These changes are caused by continental drift, which has been shifting the location of the North Pole towards the south about 10 cms per year for the last 100 years. Teams at the University of Texas using NASA’s GRACE satellite found that the North Pole’s normal drifting to the south changed in 2005 and since then, the drift has been eastward. They detected a 1.2 meter change from 2005 to 2013. They conclude that the shift is caused by climate change caused by global warming.
About the Inuit or Eskimo people
The Inuit people inhabit the far northern reaches of the Canadian Arctic and have done so for centuries. The area they inhabit is almost continually frozen under a layer of permafrost. For months at a time, their days begin and end in darkness. A nomadic people, they built tents or teepees of caribou skin in warmer months, and lived in igloos in the winter. Previously, they were known as Eskimo. The word Eskimo is from a word in their language that means “eater of raw meat.” This group of Arctic dwellers has now been renamed Inuit, a word that means “the people.” Inuk is the word to describe one member of the tribe, or “one person.” The Inuit speak many different dialects that all stem from the Eskimaleut or Inuit-Aleut language. They are primarily hunters, relying on Arctic wildlife for their survival. They fish, hunt sea mammals, such as seals and walrus, and land mammals, like Arctic hare and caribou and use seal skin and blubber for clothing, tents, and fuel. Most of their diet is made up of raw meat as there is very little plant life in their environment.
Sources:
•   http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com
•   http://www.thebigwobble.org
•   http://www.nasa.gov
•   http://edition.cnn.com
•   http://www.newscientist.com
•   http://www.newscientist.com

Visit stage3alpha at: http://s3alpha.net/?xg_source=msg_mes_network
Thanks for posting this, Barb.

There is a video, produced in 2011, IIRC, by Inuit videographer/filmmaker, Zechariah Kunuk (sp), in which he interviews a number of Inuit elders who claim what your have posted in your article.  Interestingly, each of these elders has a slightly different thing to tell, such as one talking about where the sun rises(rose), or another talking about other changes, but the overall picture is the same:  based on their observations in the past, compared to their current observations, they believe the Earth's axis or pole has shifted.

After I made my own discoveries of the changing shadow of the sun on "posts in the ground" from December, 2011 to December, 2012, and realized the Earth's axis of rotation must have shifted, I scoured the internet looking for someone who had seen the same thing.  I finally came upon the video showing these Inuit elders being interviewed, so I emailed the filmmaker, Mr. Kunuk.  He did not answer, but he apparently forwarded my letter to a professor in some Canadian university, who did write to me.

I do not believe that the "changes" are over by any means.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 12, 2015, 01:31:12 PM
Great post, ilinda!
I recalled I had started a Topic in the Canada Board, which includes First Nations, Inuit etc.  ???  ;D
Belatedly realized it would have been better if I posted the article there. (Inuit Elders tell NASA Earth Axis Shifted.)

(I just moved that Topic from the Canada Board to here, Ways of Our Past, for a number of reasons. I deleted that post in the Native American topic and posted in this one -

Aboriginal People of Canada (Some bands are in the US)

- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 12, 2015, 11:28:22 PM
Gary L. a YOWUSA Member sent this to Marshall:
RE Native conference on the return of and our origins in the Star people

“Interesting parts in here about Native American prophesies concerning the return of the Star people and the planetary system that will 'bring great changes', which one may be able to presume to be the Nemesis system and Nibiru.
They also talk about Star people in the traditions from Pleiades, as well as Orion and Draco (reptilians?)”
............................................................
Native Elders Reveal Centuries Of Extraterrestrial Contact
http://www.zengardner.com/native-elders-reveal-centuries-extraterrestrial-contact/

by Elle - Mar 11, 2015
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on March 14, 2015, 06:27:53 PM
Gary L. a YOWUSA Member sent this to Marshall:
RE Native conference on the return of and our origins in the Star people

“Interesting parts in here about Native American prophesies concerning the return of the Star people and the planetary system that will 'bring great changes', which one may be able to presume to be the Nemesis system and Nibiru.
They also talk about Star people in the traditions from Pleiades, as well as Orion and Draco (reptilians?)”
............................................................
Native Elders Reveal Centuries Of Extraterrestrial Contact
http://www.zengardner.com/native-elders-reveal-centuries-extraterrestrial-contact/

by Elle - Mar 11, 2015

Thank you very much for posting this article! Some of my friends and I have heard of this gathering, it is great to read more about this in detail!

(http://pixiecampbell.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341d475053ef014e8635d6f9970d-400wi)

Blessings,
~pB
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 14, 2015, 10:28:27 PM
Gary L. a YOWUSA Member sent this to Marshall:
RE Native conference on the return of and our origins in the Star people

“Interesting parts in here about Native American prophesies concerning the return of the Star people and the planetary system that will 'bring great changes', which one may be able to presume to be the Nemesis system and Nibiru.
They also talk about Star people in the traditions from Pleiades, as well as Orion and Draco (reptilians?)”
............................................................
Native Elders Reveal Centuries Of Extraterrestrial Contact
http://www.zengardner.com/native-elders-reveal-centuries-extraterrestrial-contact/

by Elle - Mar 11, 2015

Thank you very much for posting this article! Some of my friends and I have heard of this gathering, it is great to read more about this in detail!

(http://pixiecampbell.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341d475053ef014e8635d6f9970d-400wi)

Blessings,
~pB
pbutter it's wonderful you and friends have heard something of this gathering and all that special information....
 :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 24, 2015, 01:26:42 AM
Lac Courte Oreilles Honor the Earth Pow Wow 2015   3:12    1,181 views

video link: https://youtu.be/05qOqYcn14c

Published on Jul 20, 2015
Will LaBreche
Lac Courte Oreilles Honor the Earth Pow Wow 2015
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 24, 2015, 01:58:40 AM
July 18, 2015 Honor the Earth

video link: https://youtu.be/AAX6GcvFdlI

Published on Jul 19, 2015
ricelake54868.com
The colors dazzled the eyes! The dancing moves your soul! the beat of the drums fills your ears, and the peace of the moment frees your spirit...
...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 24, 2015, 02:18:33 AM
http://www.nativenews.net/ National Native News

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Group calls on Congress to protect Oak Flat from mining

Flags at half-staff for Navajo Code Talker Kee Etsicitty

Alaska Native veterans featured in film about Vietnam War


Children were among hundreds of community members who lined up to take part in the Thunder Valley CDC June groundbreaking on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. (Photo-Chynna Lockett)

Story by Charles Michael Ray

An effort to build a new sustainable and energy self-sufficient community on Pine Ridge, South Dakota is underway.  The Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation held a groundbreaking in June for the new housing development.

Hundreds of people including a number of federal and tribal dignitaries attended. Nick Tilsen sees the groundbreaking at the Thunder Valley CDC as a historic event that signifies a tide change on Pine Ridge. “Today is the beginning of the end of poverty on Pine Ridge,” said Tilsen.

Tilsen is the Executive Director of the Thunder Valley CDC.  He spoke just before the crowd of community members lined up in front of a set of shovels to each take a turn at the official groundbreaking.

The project is different than housing efforts in the past, in part because it’s bottom up. “This project came from the people.  This plan came from the people.  This work was derived by the grass roots people on Pine Ridge coming together to make a change, to make a difference for our community,” said Tilsen.

Those involved in the project found ways around the barriers that restricted tribal housing and community building in the past including lack of access to funding and extensive government red tape.

“We’re taking ownership over our future by creating opportunities that are grounded in what we want for our future,” Tilsen said, ” I think over the next three to five years you’re definitely going to see a lot of building happening here, streets and water and sewer, but I think you’re also going to see this project replicated all throughout Indian Country, because this project is providing inspiration to people everywhere.”

President Barack Obama championed the work. The recent federal designation of Pine Ridge as a Promise Zone fast tracks government funding for community projects such as Thunder Valley CDC.

Federal officials announced a grant of nearly $2 million for the project. Phase one includes 21 homes, up to 100 multi-family units, a workforce development center and a sustainable agricultural education center.

The overall housing shortage on the Pine Ridge reservation is much bigger.   Economic development officials estimate the cost for infrastructure and housing needs here exceed $1 billion.

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 24, 2015, 02:26:17 AM
Yowbarb Note: Several news stories on this page. There is a news radio you can play for some stories.

Charles Michael Ray)

The Native American community in Rapid City joins other groups to help improve race relations

Mohawk First Nations mark 25th anniversary of a standoff to protest development on their land

Community breaks ground on Pine Ridge housing development

http://www.nativenews.net/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 24, 2015, 02:32:13 AM
http://www.nativenews.net/station-affiliates/  Radio Stations
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 17, 2015, 08:13:14 PM
Yowbarb Note: See original pages for reference links...
...
The Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation is headquartered near Mayetta, Kansas.

(http://wiskigeamatyuk.com/Old_Potawatomi/Old-Powwow-Grounds-Mayetta.jpg)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prairie_Band_Potawatomi_Nation  History

The Mshkodésik ("People of the Small Prairie") division of the Potawatomi were originally located around the southern portions of Lake Michigan, in what today is southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and northwestern Indiana. Due to their name in the Potawatomi language, the Mshkodésik were often confused with another tribe, the Mascoutens. As part of the Council of Three Fires, the Prairie Band were signatories to the 1829 Treaty of Prairie du Chien (7 Stat. 320). Independently of the Council of Three Fires, the Prairie Band were also signatories to the 1832 Treaty of Tippecanoe (7 Stat. 378) as the Potawatomi Tribe of Indians of the Prairie.

Under the Indian Removal Act, the Prairie Band were forcibly relocated west, first to Missouri's Platte Country in the mid-1830s and then to the vicinity of Council Bluffs, Iowa in the 1840s, where they were known as the Bluff Indians. The tribe controlled up to five million acres (20,000 km²) at both locations. After 1846, the tribe moved to present-day Kansas. At that time, the reservation was thirty square miles which included part of present-day Topeka.

During the period from the 1940s - 1960s, in which the Indian termination policy was enforced, four Kansas tribes, including the Potawatomi were targeted for termination. One of the first pieces of legislation enacted during this period was the Kansas Act of 1940 which transferred all jurisdiction for crimes committed on or against Indians from federal jurisdiction to the State of Kansas. It did not preclude the federal government from trying native people, but it allowed the state into an area of law in which had historically belonged only to the federal government.

On 1 August 1953, the US Congress passed House Concurrent Resolution 108 which called for the immediate termination of the Flathead, Klamath, Menominee, Potawatomi, and Turtle Mountain Chippewa, as well as all tribes in the states of California, New York, Florida, and Texas. Termination of a tribe meant the immediate withdrawal of all federal aid, services, and protection, as well as the end of reservations. A memo issued by the Department of the Interior on 21 January 1954 clarified that the reference to "Potawatomi" in the Resolution meant the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, the Kickapoo, the Sac and Fox and the Iowa tribes in Kansas.

Because jurisdiction over criminal matters had already been transferred to the State of Kansas by the passage of the Kansas Act of 1940 the government targeted the four tribes in Kansas for immediate termination. In February, 1954 joint hearings for the Kansas tribes were held by the House and Senate Subcommittees on Indian Affairs.

The Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation tribal leader, Minnie Evans (Indian name: Ke-waht-no-quah Wish-Ken-O) led the effort to stop termination. Tribal members sent petitions of protest to the government and multiple delegations went to testify at congressional meetings in Washington, DC. Tribal Council members Vestana Cadue, Oliver Kahbeah, and Ralph Simon of the Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas traveled at their own expense to testify as well. The strong opposition from the Potawatomi and Kickapoo tribes helped them, as well as the Sac & Fox and the Iowa Tribe, avoid termination.

Government

The Prairie Band are governed by a democratically elected tribal council. Their current administration is:

Tribal Chairperson: Liana Onnen
Vice-Chairperson: Joyce Guerrero
Secretary: Camilla Chouteau
Treasurer: Hattie E. Mitchell
Council Member: Warren "Junior" Wahweotten
Council Member: Carrie O'toole
Council Member: Thomas M. Wabnum

Pass Council Members[edit]
James McKinley "Waubaunsee" Potter ( Born January 14, 1958 - Death June 11, 2014)

http://www.mercerfuneralhomes.com/fh/obituaries/obituary.cfm?o_id=2559866&fh_id=10579

Gary E. “Shaw - Nosh” Mitchell ( Born February 8, 1951 - Death January 23, 2015) http://www.mercerfuneralhomes.com/fh/obituaries/obituary.cfm?o_id=2924857&fh_id=10579

Notable Prairie Band Potawatomi people
Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Philadelphia
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 18, 2015, 08:17:16 AM
CREE CONFEDS Wildhorse 2015 Womens JINGLE  3:15  2,811 views

https://youtu.be/Z3a0yW19LwI

Published on Jul 4, 2015
CREE CONFEDERATION Singers Acosia Red Elk JINGLE DRESS
WILDHORSE CASINO Pow Wow UMATILLA Pendleton, Oregon
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on September 18, 2015, 04:35:29 PM
CREE CONFEDS Wildhorse 2015 Womens JINGLE  3:15  2,811 views

https://youtu.be/Z3a0yW19LwI

Published on Jul 4, 2015
CREE CONFEDERATION Singers Acosia Red Elk JINGLE DRESS
WILDHORSE CASINO Pow Wow UMATILLA Pendleton, Oregon
Wow!  What creativity went into making the dresses, and their energy level is amazing!  I love these people!
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 19, 2015, 02:54:07 AM
CREE CONFEDS Wildhorse 2015 Womens JINGLE  3:15  2,811 views

https://youtu.be/Z3a0yW19LwI

Published on Jul 4, 2015
CREE CONFEDERATION Singers Acosia Red Elk JINGLE DRESS
WILDHORSE CASINO Pow Wow UMATILLA Pendleton, Oregon
Wow!  What creativity went into making the dresses, and their energy level is amazing!  I love these people!

Yes, it really is wonderful to go to a Pow Wow... ! I've only been to a few...brought my son he thought it was really impressive too...

http://www.eastcountymagazine.org/sites/eastcountymagazine.org/files/pow-wow-women-sm.jpg  pow-wow-women-Barona and Syucan reservations in East San Diego County
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 03, 2015, 12:33:48 AM
http://www.theeventchronicle.com/good-news/california-farmer-gifts-700-acres-of-coastal-land-back-to-native-american-tribe/

California Farmer Gifts 700 Acres Of Coastal Land Back To Native American Tribe

For the first time in over a century, the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians will be able to enjoy the Pacific coast where they and their ancestors once hunted, fished, and roamed free.

By Amanda Froelich

150 years ago, the Pomo Native American tribe was forced to move inland and abandon the community’s coastal home in California. They left behind 668 acres of dense redwood forest, dramatic coastline, and the ability to roam and hunt freely for a small, water-poor reservation.

In 1925, the Richardson family purchased the expanse of land and was delighted in its coastal bluffs, waterfalls, and history. One member of the family, however, always knew the land didn’t really belong to them, therefore, donated it back to the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians last week.

As Good News Network reports, the Tribe may now expand its reservation to 18-times its previous size. And, for the first time in over a hundred years, the people will once again be able to enjoy the Pacific coast where they and their ancestors once hunted, fished, and lived free.

It took five years of fundraising by the Sonoma County government, The Trust for Public Land and private foundations and groups for the vision to become a reality. The effort was worth it, however, as the newly established Kashia Coastal Reserve restored ownership of the land to the tribe last week.

Sonoma County contributed two million dollars for the project while another six million was raised by the coalition of groups seeking to buy the property for the Kashia. In exchange, the California Coastal Trail will now extend north for one mile across their land, giving the public access to a cliff walk overlooking the breathtaking stretch of coastline.

KNTV shares (above) that the Tribe will manage the land as protected open space, as well as use the reclaimed land to educate the public about the history and practices of native people in the area.

Source: True Activist
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 29, 2015, 08:06:54 PM
Note: The article title said "Blackfeet" but it is the Blackfoot tribe.)
...
BREAKING NEWS - OBAMA CANCELS OIL DRILLING LEASE ON SACRED BLACKFOOT LAND

Earthjustice's photo.
Earthjustice November 24 at 12:00pm ·

BREAKING NEWS! The Blackfeet tribe received great news today when the Obama Administration announced its plans to cancel an illegal oil drilling lease on their sacred land, called the Badger-Two Medicine area, near Glacier National Park in Montana. http://ejus.tc/SacredSpaces

Thirty years ago this sacred land was illegally leased for oil and gas development. Since then the Blackfeet tribe have built an active movement fueled by the collective outrage over the oil industry’s demands to drill such a treasured landscape. For more than 10,000 years this land has provided strength, subsistence and cultural identity for the Blackfeet, and today’s government action offers hope that future generations will be inspired by its beauty.

[Facebook]SHARE and LIKE to help the Blackfeet Nation celebrate today’s exciting news!
...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 09, 2016, 03:06:12 PM

" The Soul's Journey to The Other Side Camp " Honouring Mato Gi ( Brown Bear ) Phil Lane Sr.
 

https://youtu.be/B_My0g2OXVc

Four Worlds International Institute
Uploaded on Nov 29, 2010

Filmed at the Summit of Harney Peak, in South Dakota, where Black Elk received his Great Vision, this heart- moving video magnificently reflects the Eternal Journey of The Soul.
Made by my beloved nephew, Jordan Big Horn, in honour of the passing of his Beloved Grandfather, Mato Gi, Brown Bear, (Phil Lane Sr.) to the Spiritual Worlds Beyond and the Message, Mato Gi, left for his all his loved ones just, before he rode on to the "Other Side Camp" As he always said," "We are all one Human Family"
It was his namesake before him, Mato Gi, who rode the Bay Horse and slew the White Buffalo, as Prophesied, so his generations would remember always to serve the People
It was at the Summit of Harney Peak that Black Elk recounted from His Great Vision, "I was standing on the highest mountain of them all, and round about beneath me was the whole hoop of the world...And while I stood there I saw more than I can tell and I understood more than I saw; for I was seeing in a sacred manner the shapes of all things in the spirit, and the shape of all shapes as they must live together like one being."
In memory of those men that have inspired and guided me in my life: Wilfred Cadotte, Ed Calf Robe, Pete Catches, Ed Claplanaho, Joe DeLaCruz, Vine Deloria Sr, Vine Deloria Jr, Devere Eastman, Meleton Gallardo Daniel Jordan, Pappy Hastings, Peter Hegi, Ben and Franklin Kahn, Charles Kills Enemy, John Fire Lame Deer, Lionel Kinunwa, Fred Lane, Phil Lucas, Alphonse Many Grey Horses,Bill Minthorn, Enoch Olinga, Ben Pease Sr., Joe Shields Sr.,Henry Spotted Eagle, Vince & Walter Stoggin, Walter Strong Heart, Henry Swift Cloud, Tim Wapato, Frank White Buffalo Man,Bernie White Bear
 
 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 09, 2016, 03:29:31 PM
Dakota Elder Phil Lane Sr. interviewed by Daughter, Faith Spotted Eagle

https://youtu.be/OcJ7jFnWCHQ
 
Four Worlds International Institute
Published on Aug 11, 2014
Dakota Elder, Mato Gi, Brown Bear, Phil Lane Sr.is interviewed on Dakota Culture and History by his Micunksci, Faith Spotted Eagle,. Lethbridge, Alberta, November 4, 2001.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:09:58 PM
http://nativetimes.com/index.php/component/content/?view=featured&start=235
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:24:50 PM
This article is in the News section/Federal news of the Native Times website:
...
newshttp://nativetimes.com/index.php/news/federal/12718-president-requests-140-4-million-for-ost

President requests $140.4 million for OST
 
 Parent Category: News
    Published on Thursday, 11 February 2016 18:31

 Written by WHITE HOUSE MEDIA RELEASE

 Hits: 314

WASHINGTON – The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2017 budget request for the Department of the Interior’s Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) underscores the Administration’s support for meeting Federal trust responsibilities to Native Americans and ensuring that OST will be able to fully carry out its responsibilities to Indian trust beneficiaries in FY 2017.

“This is a smart, innovative and forward-looking budget that invests in Interior’s key missions – now and in the future – so we can continue to serve the American people,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “The President’s budget provides targeted investments to create economic opportunities by growing our domestic energy portfolio, building climate resilient communities, and revitalizing America’s national parks as we mark their 100th anniversary.  Consistent with the President’s abiding commitment to Indian Country, this budget provides critical support for Tribal self-determination and economic advancement.”

“OST is the premiere public service organization dedicated to the Indian fiduciary trust,” said Special Trustee Vincent Logan. “This carefully crafted, modest budget allows us to continue to provide consistent, effective, and ever-improving service to Indian trust beneficiaries.”

The FY 2017 budget request of $140.4 million is $1.4 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and increases funding to OST’s Field Operations, Business Management, Program Management, Appraisal Services, and Trust Services offices.  It decreases funding to the organization’s Office of Historical Trust Accounting reflecting an anticipated workload decrease.  These adjustments will allow OST to expand financial empowerment support to its beneficiaries, address a critical shortage of licensed Native American asset appraisers, and make strategic investments in its workforce.

In the 20 years since its establishment, OST has worked to restore confidence in trust management and serve as a responsible steward of resources. Its progress was demonstrated most recently when, for the third year running, it received a "clean" audit, demonstrating that OST conscientiously upholds its fiduciary duty with accuracy and accountability. Achievements such as this, along with the investments included in the FY 2017 budget, will position OST to continue to provide exemplary service to its beneficiaries and value to the taxpayers.

The President’s FY 2017 budget request of $13.4 billion for the Department of the Interior reflects his commitment to meet Federal trust responsibilities to Native Americans, conserve vital national landscapes across the Nation, support the next century of our National Park Service, and responsible management of energy development on public lands and offshore areas. The Budget in Brief is online: www.doi.gov/budget and www.doi.gov/budget/2017/Hilites/toc.html.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:29:51 PM
This article is found in the Native Times site. Click News, then click Politics http://nativetimes.com/index.php/news/politics/10683-native-americans-say-voting-rights-are-violated

Native Americans say voting rights are violated
 
Parent Category: News
Published on Wednesday, 15 October 2014 17:38

Written by Associated Press
Hits: 3369

WANBLEE, S.D. (AP) – Four Lakota residents of a community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation have filed a federal lawsuit claiming that officials in a South Dakota county are violating their voting rights.

The Wanblee residents argue in the lawsuit that Jackson County is discriminating against Native Americans by not opening a satellite office in their community for voter registration and absentee voting, the Rapid City Journal reported Sunday. Oglala Sioux Tribe vice president Thomas Poor Bear is among the plaintiffs.

The plaintiffs on Friday filed a motion asking U.S. District Judge Karen Schreier to issue a preliminary injunction ordering the county to open a satellite office in Wanblee for the time left before the election.

Jackson County auditor Vicki Wilson declined to comment on the details of the lawsuit.

Meanwhile, South Dakota Secretary of State Jason Gant says all of the county’s residents have the same access to voter registration and absentee voting as every South Dakotan.

“We are 100 percent equal across the state,” Gant said. “Every South Dakota county has at least one location within their county borders where people can absentee vote face-to-face.”

South Dakota residents can now request a voter registration form at the courthouse or online and mail it to the county auditor’s office.

The lawsuit claims Jackson County’s Native American residents have to travel twice as far as other residents to register in person or vote absentee. The plaintiffs say Wanblee is about 27 miles or a little more than 30 minutes by car from the county seat at Kadoka. They also argue that making the trip is a financial hardship on Native Americans.

The last day to register to vote for the Nov. 4 general election is Oct. 20. Absentee ballots must be requested by 5 p.m. the day before the election. Absentee ballot requests are available online, but they must be notarized before being mailed to the auditor. Completed ballots can be returned by mail.

“That’s the same as it is in every other county that has a county seat,” Gant said.

The county has until Wednesday to reply to the complaint.

–––
Information from: Rapid City Journal, http://www.rapidcityjournal.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:35:47 PM
This article is from Tribla News. Click News, then click Politics.

http://nativetimes.com/index.php/news/politics/12694-montana-establishes-5-election-offices-on-tribal-land

Montana establishes 5 election offices on tribal land
 
Parent Category: News   

Published on Monday, 01 February 2016 18:30

Written by Associated Press
Hits: 143

HELENA, Mont. (AP) – Five new election offices are set to open on tribal lands across Montana in advance of this year’s elections.

The satellite election offices are a result of a directive issued last fall by the secretary of state to widen access to the ballot box among Native Americans under the federal Voting Rights Act.

Two of those offices will open in Big Horn County, and one each in Roosevelt, Glacier and Rosebud counties.

Secretary of State Linda McCulloch says six other counties are currently in talks with tribal governments to open additional offices.

McCulloch directed counties to open discussions with tribal leaders last fall, following a 2012 settlement of a lawsuit brought under federal law. The offices are meant to improve convenience on Election Day and increase access to early voting.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:39:57 PM
http://nativetimes.com/index.php/news/politics/11499-judge-refuses-to-dismiss-jackson-county-voting-rights-case

Judge refuses to dismiss Jackson County voting rights case
 
Parent Category: News   
Published on Friday, 08 May 2015 15:58
Written by Associated Press

Hits: 1242

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) – A federal judge says a voting rights lawsuit that four Oglala Sioux tribal members filed against Jackson County can proceed.

County officials had asked U.S. District Judge Karen Schreier to dismiss the lawsuit, but the Rapid City Journal reports she’s denied the motion. Schreier says the tribal members have provided enough information to support their allegations.

Plaintiffs argue the county’s practice of offering in-person voter registration and in-person absentee voting only at the county courthouse in Kadoka discriminates against Native Americans living in the portion of the county that’s within the Pine Ridge Reservation.

County officials agreed to open a satellite office for voter registration and early voting in Wanblee, but Schreier says that didn’t absolve the county of its obligation to comply with the federal Voting Rights Act.
–––
Information from: Rapid City Journal, http://www.rapidcityjournal.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 06:48:35 PM
Ogalala Lakota Nation Powwow 2015 Mens Northern Traditional ft Nathan Chasinghorse Day 3 Song 2

https://youtu.be/eMRKiQBbYR0

Published on Aug 5, 2015
Oyate Kin Kiyape Wiyan
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA4fvPqf27HzPwpegvn7J9g

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 07:02:05 PM
Yowbarb Note: Here are some excerpts from an article.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oglala_Lakota

Oglala Lakota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Oglala Lakota or Oglala Sioux (pronounced [oɡəˈlala], meaning "to scatter one's own" in Lakota language) are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota people, who along with the Nakota and Dakota, make up the Great Sioux Nation. A majority of the Oglala live on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, the eighth-largest Native American reservation in the United States. The Oglala are a federally recognized tribe whose official title is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (previously called the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota). Of note, however, some Oglala reject the term "Sioux" because it was a name give to them by the Chippewa Nation, who were historically enemies of the Lakota. The term means "snake" and, as such, is seen as a slur.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 07:37:01 PM
Just a few notes.
.............................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sioux

Sioux

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Sioux /ˈsuː/ are a Native American tribe and First Nations band government in North America. The term can refer to any ethnic group within the Great Sioux Nation or any of the nation's many language dialects. The Sioux comprise three major divisions based on Siouan dialect and subculture: the Santee, the Yankton-Yanktonai, and the Lakota.

The Santee (Isáŋyathi; "Knife"), also called Eastern Dakota, reside in the extreme east of the Dakotas, Minnesota and northern Iowa. The Yankton and Yanktonai (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), collectively also referred to as the Western Dakota or by the endonym Wičhíyena, reside in the Minnesota River area. They are considered to be the middle Sioux, and have in the past been erroneously classified as Nakota. The Lakota, also called Teton (Thítȟuŋwaŋ; possibly "Dwellers on the prairie"), are the westernmost Sioux, known for their hunting and warrior culture.

Today, the Sioux maintain many separate tribal governments scattered across several reservations, communities, and reserves in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Montana in the United States; and Manitoba and southern Saskatchewan in Canada.

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 07:53:18 PM
http://mendotadakota.com/mn/about-us/who-we-are-2/

Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Tribal Community
 1351 Sibley Memorial Hwy, Mendota, MN 55150

Postal: P.O. Box 50835, Mendota, MN 55150
 Phone: 651- 452-4141  Email: mendotadakota@gmail.com
...............................................................................................
http://mendotadakota.com/mn/become-a-member/  Become an honorary member
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2016, 08:25:28 PM
Now HERE'S some news!
Usually it takes awhile for funds to be dispersed? I hope the Tribes can collect on this before all H____ breaks loose with this world.
Maybe it will help them get better stocked up, build domes, etc. ?
...
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/judge-approves-nearly-dollar1b-settlement-between-us-and-tribes/ar-BBpWIwv?ocid=spartanntp

Judge approves nearly $1B settlement between US and tribes

AP
By MARY HUDETZ, Associated Press
5 hrs ago

This story corrects the amount approved in court for attorneys' fees.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: steedy on February 27, 2016, 06:56:53 PM
I feel very fortunate to have met Sitting Bull's great-grandson.  Very nice guy.  His girlfriend said I could attend any local NA Powwow if I wanted to, even though I'm not NA.  Most of the Powwows here are just small festivals selling "Indian" stuff that is usually made outside the US.  I was very disappointed in that.  But being invited to a genuine Powwow, despite not being NA, was a true honor.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 29, 2016, 12:49:20 AM
I feel very fortunate to have met Sitting Bull's great-grandson.  Very nice guy.  His girlfriend said I could attend any local NA Powwow if I wanted to, even though I'm not NA.  Most of the Powwows here are just small festivals selling "Indian" stuff that is usually made outside the US.  I was very disappointed in that.  But being invited to a genuine Powwow, despite not being NA, was a true honor.
steedy, that's great! That is so great to be invited.
A part Comanche friend of mine told me where a big pow wow was coming up and she told me where. My son drove and the three of us went. Inland Empire - desert. It was magical, a nightime pow wow. I wonder where my friend is now...
Maybe you could ask someone in the tribal council there if they do sell their own handmade crafts and items at PowWows. Surely they must...?
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 16, 2016, 02:31:21 PM
March 16, 2016

http://www.alternet.org/environment/tribe-beats-back-fracking-north-dakota

In North Dakota’s Booming Oil Patch, One Tribe Beat Back Fracking
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on March 16, 2016, 04:34:10 PM
Looks like the Turtle Mountain Band represents some of the smartest people in North America! 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 25, 2016, 09:58:52 AM
Looks like the Turtle Mountain Band represents some of the smartest people in North America!

I wish a lot of folks would follow their example... Of course there are lots of demonstrations and people chaining themselves to the equipment, apparently to no avail.
I suppose the fact it is tribal land makes a difference. Fracking companies can go trash an area at will ... in most areas.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 25, 2016, 10:18:00 AM
Looks like the Turtle Mountain Band represents some of the smartest people in North America!

Anyway hoo-ray for the lady elders of that Turtle band who stopped fracking on their lands! :) This music sounds appropriately celebratory...
Video five years ago on the grounds of the Turtle Mountain Band of the Chippewa.
...
Pow Wow in North Dakota, Part 1     2:16  6,343 views

link: https://youtu.be/jO_Q6REevPo

Uploaded on May 19, 2010
This Pow Wow was held on the grounds of the Turtle Mountain Band of the Chippewa Indian tribe. It is a spiritual ceremony of drumming, singing and dancing that traditionally starts with a drum roll. Many Native American tribes are involved from the US and Canada, most of whom travel the 'pow wow circuit'. 1:36 is my favorite part.


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 25, 2016, 05:46:17 PM
Pow Wow in North Dakota , Part 2     0:32    1,578 views

link: https://youtu.be/yRYge0G7ZGM

Uploaded on May 19, 2010
Note the rhythmic frequency. That beat is in harmony with our heartbeat and the frequency of the Earth, 60 Hz. The dance movements are grounded to the Earth. Each song has an emotion, sometimes the women will trill.
...
Pow Wow in North Dakota, Part 3     1:52  2,717 views

Link: https://youtu.be/_swMp8VI5KA

Uploaded on May 19, 2010
Every outfit is handmade, taking months to make. There are grass dancers, fancy shawl dressers and jingle dancers at 0:33 with outfits that have soda can tabs sewn into it. Note the medicine bags, usually worn on the left. If a feather falls onto the ground, you must not touch it because they are considered sacred. A lot of the children are freestyling.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 25, 2016, 05:56:00 PM
Note: To my knowledge: All these posted by electromagetician in this group about a North Dakota Pow Wow are about the Turtle Mountain Band of the Chippewa Indian tribe.
...
Pow Wow in North Dakota, Part 4   0:52   2,076 views

link: https://youtu.be/MxLPNZ95t7Q

Uploaded on May 19, 2010
Pow wows are usually done in the summer, on weekends. The announcer is announcing a singing contest. There was also a dance contest earlier. Way in the back, the food vendors sold delicious Indian tacos. There was no shortage of American flags.

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 04, 2016, 02:12:52 AM
Joe Medicine Crow, Crow historian has passed away at the age of 102.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Medicine_Crow

Joe Medicine Crow

Joseph Medicine Crow-High Bird (October 27, 1913 – April 3, 2016), affectionately known as CrowJoe to friends, was a historian and author of the Crow Nation of Native Americans. His writings on Native American history and reservation culture are considered seminal works, but he is best known for his writings and lectures concerning the Battle of the Little Bighorn. During his lifetime he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Bronze Star Medal and the Légion d'honneur. During World War II, he became the last war chief of the Crow Tribe, and was the last living Plains Indian war chief. He was a founding member of the Traditional Circle of Indian Elders & Youth.

Early life

Joseph Medicine Crow-High Bird was born on the Crow reservation near Lodge Grass, Montana.  He was a cousin to Pauline Small, the first woman elected to the Crow Tribe of Indians. His step-grandfather, White Man Runs Him, was a scout for George Armstrong Custer and an eyewitness to the battle.
He grew up hearing stories of the momentous event. The first member of his tribe to attend college, his graduate studies were interrupted by World War II.

Education

Medicine Crow began his studies at Bacone College in Muskogee, Oklahoma in 1928 and received a bachelor's degree from Linfield College in 1938. He attended the University of Southern California, earning a master's degree in anthropology in 1939. He was the first member of the Crow tribe to obtain a master's degree. His thesis, The Effects of European Culture Contact upon the Economic, Social, and Religious Life of the Crow Indians, has become one of the most widely cited documents concerning Crow culture.

World War II

After spending the latter half of 1942 working in the naval ship yards in Bremerton, Washington, Medicine Crow joined the Army in 1943, became a scout in the 103rd Infantry Division and fought in World War II. Whenever he went into battle, he wore his war paint beneath his uniform and a sacred eagle feather beneath his helmet. Medicine Crow completed all four tasks required to become a war chief: Touching an enemy without killing him, taking an enemy's weapon, leading a successful war party and stealing an enemy's horse.

He touched a living enemy soldier and disarmed an enemy when he turned a corner and found himself face to face with a young German soldier:

“ The collision knocked the German's weapon to the ground. Mr. Crow lowered his own weapon and the two fought hand-to-hand. In the end Mr. Crow got the best of the German, grabbing him by the neck and choking him. He was going to kill the German soldier on the spot when the man screamed out 'momma.' Mr. Crow then let him go. ”

He also led a successful war party and stole an enemy horse – fifty Nazi SS horses from a German camp (as he rode off, he sang a traditional Crow honor song). He is the last member of the Crow tribe to become a war chief. Of his story, documentarian Ken Burns said, "The story of Joseph Medicine Crow is something I've wanted to tell for 20 years." Medicine Crow was interviewed and appeared in the 2007 Ken Burns PBS series The War, describing his World War II service.

Tribal spokesman

After serving in the Army, he returned to the Crow Agency. In 1948, he was appointed tribal historian and anthropologist, and served as a board member or officer on the Crow Central Education Commission almost continuously since its inception in 1972. In 1999, he addressed the United Nations. He was a frequent guest speaker at Little Big Horn College and the Little Big Horn Battlefield Museum, and appeared in several documentaries about the battle. He wrote a script "that has been used at the reenactment of the Battle of Little Big Horn held every summer in Hardin since 1965."

His books include Crow Migration Story, Medicine Crow, the Handbook of the Crow Indians Law and Treaties, Crow Indian Buffalo Jump Techniques, and From the Heart of Crow Country. He also authored a children’s book entitled Brave Wolf and the Thunderbird.

He continued to write and lecture at universities and public institutions until his death.

Honors

On June 25, 2008 he received two military decorations, the Bronze Star and the Légion d'honneur. On July 17, 2008 Senators Max Baucus, Jon Tester, and Mike Enzi introduced a bill to award him the Congressional Gold Medal; however, the bill did not garner the required sponsorship of two-thirds of the Senate to move forward Congressional Gold Medal legislation.

His book Counting Coup: Becoming a Crow Chief on the Reservation and Beyond, written about his life, was chosen by the National Council for the Social Studies as a "Notable Tradebook for Young People" in 2007.

He received an honorary doctorate from Rocky Mountain College in 1999. He received an honorary doctorate at the University of Southern California in 2003 and an honorary doctorate at Bacone College in 2010, where he was an ambassador and commencement speaker for over 50 years.

Medicine Crow received the Presidential Medal of Freedom (the United States' highest civilian honor) from President Barack Obama on August 12, 2009. He died at the age of 102 on April 3, 2016 while under hospice care in Billings, Montana.

See Bibliography on page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Medicine_Crow
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 04, 2016, 02:29:33 AM
Celebrating 100 years with Dr. Joe Medicine Crow

https://youtu.be/kT5pghY2B6g

Oct 29, 2013
Crow Nation celebrating Dr. Medicine Crow's 100th Birthday
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 04, 2016, 02:36:37 AM
Dr.Joe Medicine Crow speaks about the Battle of the Little Bighorn 3:42  11,656

https://youtu.be/OFu81yHWyWA

Uploaded on Feb 19, 2009
Dr. Joe Medicine Crow speaks about Garryowen Montana, the site of the battle of the little bighorn.
Learn more at www.town4sale.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 04, 2016, 02:47:27 AM
Medicine Crow War Chief Story  8:43   40,108 views

https://youtu.be/O_9-arto8D8

Uploaded on Feb 28, 2010
The War, Joe Medicine Crow, the last Plains Indian War Chief.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 20, 2016, 01:55:42 AM
http://www.weather.gov/

http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=usa&wwa=Child Abduction

Child Abduction Emergency

MTC001-003-005-007-009-011-013-015-017-019-021-023-025-027-029-
031-033-035-037-039-041-043-045-047-049-051-053-055-057-059-061-
063-065-067-069-071-073-075-077-079-081-083-085-087-089-091-093-
095-097-099-101-103-105-107-109-111-202000-

URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
CHILD ABDUCTION EMERGENCY...CORRECTED
MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
RELAYED BY NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GREAT FALLS MT
154 AM MDT WED APR 20 2016

THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE IS TRANSMITTED AT THE REQUEST OF THE
MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.

KENZLEY AVA-LEANN OLSON...A 1 YEAR OLD NATIVE AMERICAN FEMALE
CHILD WAS ABDUCTED AT APPROXIMATELY 1230 PM ON TUESDAY APRIL 19
2016 FROM A RESIDENCE IN POPLAR MONTANA. A VEHICLE OF INTEREST IS
A SILVER 2006 CHRYSLER 300C WITH NORTH DAKOTA LICENSE KCV650.
PERSONS OF INTEREST ARE MELINDA TWEET AND TIMOTHY DUANE
DORNHEIM...BOTH FROM MINOT NORTH DAKOTA...AND POSSIBLY RETURNING
TO MINOT. IF YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION ON THE LOCATION OF KENZLEY
OLSON...PLEASE CALL 9 1 1 OR THE ROOSEVELT COUNTY SHERIFF AT
406-653-6240.

$$
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 17, 2016, 01:02:06 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/03/29/police-kill-navajo-woman-allegedly-armed-scissors-163955

Police Kill Navajo Woman Allegedly Armed With Scissors

Alysa Landry
3/29/16

A Navajo woman was shot and killed by police on Easter Sunday after apparently threatening an officer with a weapon in Winslow, Arizona.

Loreal Juana Barnell-Tsingine, 27, was shot five times after an altercation that began with a shoplifting call at a Circle K at around 4 p.m. Officers located a woman matching the description of the suspect a few blocks away from the convenience store and a struggle ensued.

An officer, who has not been identified by name, said Tsingine displayed a weapon that posed a “substantial threat.” Police have not divulged what the weapon was, though family members claim Tsingine was armed only with a pair of scissors.

“While attempting to take the subject into custody, a struggle ensued,” the Winslow Police Department states in a press release. “At this time, the subject displayed a weapon which presented a substantial threat to the officer. The officer discharged his weapon resulting in the unfortunate death.” Tsingine was pronounced dead at the scene.

The officer involved has been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation, the department’s press release states.

Detectives from the Arizona Department of Public Safety’s Major Crimes District are conducting an investigation, DPS spokesman Raul Garcia said in a statement. He declined to provide any additional information.

Winslow Police said more information will be released as the investigation develops.

“We are confident that the DPS will be (conducting a) thorough and unbiased investigation,” the press release states. “The Winslow Police Dept. wishes to express our deepest sympathies to Miss Tsingine’s family, the officers and the community of Winslow.”

In a statement, the family said Tsingine was a mother, daughter, sister, cousin niece and friend.

“She was loved by so many,” the family shared with ICTMN. “There are no words to describe the pain in our hearts.”





Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 17, 2016, 10:05:31 PM
https://www.facebook.com/KILIRadio90.1/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf

KILI Radio - The Voice of Lakota Nation
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on August 26, 2016, 11:37:45 AM
Barb Note: Aug 18, 2016 Alaska - Bering Land Bridge Nation votes to relocate entire village  due to the threat of rising seas

http://floodlist.com/america/usa/usa-village-alaska-votes-relocate-due-threat-rising-seas

USA – Village in Alaska Votes to Relocate Due to Threat of Rising Seas

22 AUGUST, 2016 BY TRUST.ORG IN FLOOD PROTECTION, USA  ·

A Native American village in Alaska has voted to relocate its entire population of some 600 people due to the threat of rising seas, by Sebastien Malo for the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Photo by Bering Land Bridge Nation, CC BY 2.0
NEW YORK, Aug 18 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A Native American village in the U.S. state of Alaska has voted to relocate its entire population of some 600 people due to the threat of rising seas, officials said on Thursday.

Shishmaref, located on a tiny island north of the Bering Strait that separates the United States and Russia, is losing up to 10 feet (three meters) of shoreline each year, according to research by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Alabama-based Auburn University.

Shishmaref is one of dozens of indigenous villages in Alaska that face growing threats of flooding and erosion due to global warming, according to a report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Shishmaref residents, who are members of the Inupiat tribe, voted 89 to 78 to relocate, said Donna Barr, secretary of the Shishmaref Council. Voting took place earlier this week, but the official count has not yet been formally certified and a handful of absentee ballots remain unopened.

This is not the first time Shishmaref residents have made such a decision. They voted in 2002 to relocate but that effort stalled.

A few other U.S. communities in Alaska, Washington and Louisiana have decided recently to relocate as well due to climate change and shoreline erosion, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Arctic Institute.

Several others are likely weighing options to move, said Christina DeConcini, a spokeswoman for the Washington, D.C.-based World Resources Institute.

“It’s not going to be the last time that the United States has to deal with communities severely threatened by climate change and impacts and whether or not they can stay there,” she said.

In Shishmaref, Tommy Richter, pastor of the Lutheran Church, the island’s only church, said the community was torn over leaving its heritage behind.

“There are people here who have been here for generations and don’t want to leave at all,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The cost of relocation has been estimated at some $180 million, and authorities are seeking state and federal funding, according to local media.

Where to relocate remains to be decided, the clerk said. Two vacant sites on the mainland are being considered.

Relocation could take more than ten years, according to a private feasibility study conducted for Shishmaref and published in February.

The island, which is seven square miles (18 square kilometers), lies five miles off the mainland. Its economy is based largely on fishing and hunting.

Scientists attribute coastal erosion in Shishmaref to global warming that has thawed sea ice that once shielded the island from storm surges. Its permafrost, the layer of permanently frozen soil on which it is built, is melting as well.

The village already has moved several homes and a National Guard Armory away from its coastline and built sea walls that have had limited success, according to Alaska authorities.

In March, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced $6.5 million in funding to help Native American communities find ways to deal with climate change.

Since 2014, more than 140 tribes and tribal organizations have gotten government funding to help address the impacts of global warming, it said.

Reporting by Sebastien Malo, Editing by Ellen Wulfhorst for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 04, 2016, 10:55:09 AM
Barb Note: At least six native American protesters bitten by dogs. Some were pepper sprayed.
...
http://countercurrentnews.com/2016/09/police-do-nothing-mercenaries-protesters-dogs/

https://www.facebook.com/CampOfTheSacredStone/videos

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37249617?post_id=10208319394916071_10208350733739522#_=_

Life in the Native American oil protest camps
2 September 2016
 From the section US & Canada
An Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of a new oil pipeline. As a result, a new community has emerged. The BBC's Charlie Northcott went to North Dakota to meet the protesters and discover what goes on in camp. [continues  ]
...
https://itsgoingdown.org/final-straw-ladonna-brave-bull-allard-resisting-dakota-access-pipeline/

Final Straw  It's Going Down

LADONNA BRAVE BULL ALLARD ON RESISTING DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE August 22, 2016

From The Final Straw............. http://www.ashevillefm.org/the-final-straw
Download and Listen Here......  http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/87949

Airs on WSFM-LP 103.3 in Asheville / streaming at AshevilleFM from 3am EST on August 22nd, 2016, through August 28th, then podcasting at radio4all.net. Also airing this week on KOWA-LPFM in Olympia, WA, KWTF in Bodega Bay, CA, KXCF in Marshall, CA, and WCRS-LP Columbus Community Radio 98.3 and 102.1 FM. The show will later be archived at TheFinalStrawRadio.NoBlogs.Org. You can email us at thefinalstrawradio@riseup.net and you can send us mail at:

The Final Straw
c/o AshevilleFM
864 Haywood rd
Asheville, NC 28806

This week a new member of The Final Straw, Gil O’Teen, spoke with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, also a historian and geneologist for that tribe, and the owner of the Sacred Stones Camp. Our guest and interviewer speak about the Sacred Stones Camp, which is a group of people who are standing in active opposition to Dakota Access’s attempts to build a crude oil pipeline (DAPL) whose proposed route would go from North Dakota to southern Illinois, traveling through 50 counties and 4 states. They speak about the impacts that this pipeline would have on the people who live in the area, which is also a sacred site for the Lakota folks, how the media has been portraying this issue, the media blackout which has recently been imposed on the camp, and many more topics.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 04, 2016, 10:59:48 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37249617?post_id=10208319394916071_10208350733739522#_=_

Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of a new oil pipeline. As a result, a new community has emerged.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 10, 2016, 09:33:18 AM
Yowbarb Note:  The Administration stopped the pipeline which was to go under the Missouri and potentially pollute lots of water and the land of the Standing Rock Sioux. This happened just a few short hours after a Federal Judge ordered AGAINST the tribe!!  I don't know if this is going to be a permanent stop. I hope so.
...
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/295223-obama-administration-orders-nd-pipeline-construction-to-stop

Obama administration orders ND pipeline construction to stop

"The Department of Justice, the Army and the Interior Department jointly announced that construction would pause on the pipeline near North Dakota's Lake Oahe, a major water source on the Missouri River for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe."

By Devin Henry - 09/09/16 03:52 PM EDT
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on September 11, 2016, 05:15:54 PM
Congratulations to all who have been trying to stop the "Trespass Pipeline".  And maybe we should send our prayers to prevent the next president from undoing this stoppage.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 14, 2016, 12:31:16 PM
Congratulations to all who have been trying to stop the "Trespass Pipeline".  And maybe we should send our prayers to prevent the next president from undoing this stoppage.

Thank you for your post, ilinda - and yes prayers are definitely in order. Unfortunately, even though President Obama himself ordered a halt to production until a full environmental and (effect on humans and their culture) study was done -the a____ holes started work the next day and even had some protesters arrested.
The pipeline company is REFUSING to stop construction. There was a huge demonstration in DC yesterday, a big one at Standing Rock too. More on it when I find the right video link...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on September 14, 2016, 05:14:00 PM
Congratulations to all who have been trying to stop the "Trespass Pipeline".  And maybe we should send our prayers to prevent the next president from undoing this stoppage.

Thank you for your post, ilinda - and yes prayers are definitely in order. Unfortunately, even though President Obama himself ordered a halt to production until a full environmental and (effect on humans and their culture) study was done -the a____ holes started work the next day and even had some protesters arrested.
The pipeline company is REFUSING to stop construction. There was a huge demonstration in DC yesterday, a big one at Standing Rock too. More on it when I find the right video link...
My best guess is that the pipeline company is refusing to stop construction, cuz they are just itching to kill a few protesters.  Or many.  They are probably waiting for someone to try to physically stop them, and even taking bets on who gets to do the first killin'.

I cringe for the innocent people whose lives, land, and water will be destroyed when that thing leaks, as it is a given that it will.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 14, 2016, 05:19:32 PM
Congratulations to all who have been trying to stop the "Trespass Pipeline".  And maybe we should send our prayers to prevent the next president from undoing this stoppage.

Thank you for your post, ilinda - and yes prayers are definitely in order. Unfortunately, even though President Obama himself ordered a halt to production until a full environmental and (effect on humans and their culture) study was done -the a____ holes started work the next day and even had some protesters arrested.
The pipeline company is REFUSING to stop construction. There was a huge demonstration in DC yesterday, a big one at Standing Rock too. More on it when I find the right video link...
My best guess is that the pipeline company is refusing to stop construction, cuz they are just itching to kill a few protesters.  Or many.  They are probably waiting for someone to try to physically stop them, and even taking bets on who gets to do the first killin'.

I cringe for the innocent people whose lives, land, and water will be destroyed when that thing leaks, as it is a given that it will.

I've been signing petitions to bring criminal complaints against the people including police who have harmed the protesters. Maybe the department of justice needs to become involved. After all they are disobeying a Presidential order. They should be cleared out by federal troops (local police and workers on the pipeline refusing to stop work.) It is not a joke, they act like they own this country which of course they do. Big oil.
Corporacracy. But there are arms of the government that have the right to stop them.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 14, 2016, 05:33:24 PM
Activists, 200+ tribes unite to fight Dakota Access Pipeline  more videos on this page:

https://www.rt.com/usa/359246-police-arrest-22-dakota-protesters/

Police arrest 22 after ‘swarm’ at Dakota pipeline construction site

Published time: 14 Sep, 2016 01:42

Police said they arrested 22 people at the construction site of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, claiming people were interfering with equipment. The arrests were made 70 miles northwest of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s main protest site.
The Morton County Sheriff’s Office said about 50 law enforcement police responded to events the site near Glen Ullin Tuesday after construction workers said they had been “swarmed” by protesters and that two people had “attached” themselves to equipment.

The protesters face charges of criminal trespassing, and the two attached to equipment faces charges of hindering law enforcement and disorderly conduct, according to the Sheriff’s spokeswoman, Donnell Preskey, according to AP.

The site near Glen Ullin is not part of the temporary work stoppage ordered by the federal judge or the section the federal government asked Energy Transfer Partners to voluntarily stop work on last Friday.

Hundreds of people from over 200 indigenous nations have gathered in the area to support the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which claimed in a lawsuit filed against federal regulators that the oil pipeline would harm water supplies and disturb sacred burial and cultural sites.

The lawsuit challenges the Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to grant about 200 permits at water crossings for the pipeline. For now, the federal government has issued a temporary halt to construction on Army Corps land around and underneath Lake Oahe, one of six reservoirs on the Missouri River. Three federal agencies also asked Energy Transfer Partners for a “voluntary pause” in work for 20 miles on either side of Lake Oahe.

“We are dealing with a world that doesn’t understand who we are,” Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, told RT. “It is time, it is really time, for the world to understand that there is something deeper than this Western-type of development that continues to take and take out of Mother Earth without giving back.”

[continues and more videos on page] https://www.rt.com/usa/359246-police-arrest-22-dakota-protesters/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 30, 2016, 01:26:03 AM
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/

Federal Agencies Seek Input on Infrastructure Decision Making Following DAPL

ICTMN Staff
9/23/16
Two weeks after a joint announcement by the Departments of Justice, of the Army, and of the Interior called for the halt of construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in North Dakota, the three agencies invited representatives from all 567 federally recognized tribes to participate in government-to-government consultations on infrastructure decision making.

The agencies sent a letter to tribal offices, informing of their intent to seek tribal input on two questions specifically:

— How can federal agencies better ensure meaningful tribal input into infrastructure-related reviews and decisions, to protect tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights within the existing statutory framework?

— Should the federal agencies propose new legislation altering the statutory framework to promote these goals?

The plan for the initial consultation sessions was announced September 9 when the agencies called for the immediate, yet temporary halting of construction following federal judge James Boasberg’s denial of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for an injunction of the DAPL.

RELATED: Moments After Judge Denies DAPL Injunction, Federal Agencies Intervene

The consultation meetings are set to begin with a listening session on October 11, followed by formal tribal consultations scheduled in six regions of the country from October 25 through November 21. A deadline of November 30 has been set for written input.

In the letter to all federally recognized tribes, the agencies highlight the aggressiveness of the schedule for the sessions, but note that the reasoning is due to the subject matter and urgency of the issues.

The letter closes by stating, “We understand that tribal nations’ voices must be heard, in a timely and meaningful way, with regard to Federal decisions that could affect their treaties, homelands, environment, cultural, properties and sacred [places]. We look forward to your input as to how our agencies, and the Federal Government as a whole, can improve Federal decision-making processes that affect tribal lands and resources, and treaty rights to ensure that those decisions are fully consistent with our obligations to tribal nations.”

Following the agencies announcement, Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II released the following statement: “The Obama Administration’s call for national reform on this issue is a historic moment. We welcome the Administration’s invitation to all tribes to consult on the process for decision-making on infrastructure projects. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe are fighting for our lives, our people and our sacred places because of a failed process for approval of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not hold meaningful consultation with our tribe before approving construction of this pipeline. They did not conduct a survey of cultural resources. They have not conducted a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

“We have already seen the damage caused by a lack of consultation. The ancient burial sites where our Lakota and Dakota ancestors were laid to rest have been destroyed. The desecration of family graves is something that most people could never imagine.

“The Army Corps must conduct a full EIS. Our water, our resources and our lives are at risk because of this pipeline. Our sacred places that we have lost can never be replaced. The Army Corps and all federal agencies have a responsibility to our tribe, and all tribes, to honor the treaties. This invitation is a good start but the government has a lot more to do to permanently protect the millions of people who rely on the Missouri River for water and who are put at serious risk because of this pipeline. They can start by stopping construction until the EIS is complete

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/23/federal-agencies-seek-input-infrastructure-decision-making-following-dapl-165889
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 30, 2016, 01:34:17 AM
9/26/16: White House Outlines Massive Outreach to Indian Country at Tribal Nations Conference

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/26/white-house-outlines-massive-outreach-indian-country-tribal-nations-conference-165903

Vincent Schilling
9/26/16
As the 8th Annual White House Tribal Nations Conference (WHTNC) kicked off Monday in Washington DC, the White House released a massive plan of continued action, entitled “An All-of-Government Approach to Serving Indian Country.”

The White House Tribal Nations Conference is the result of the promise President Barack Obama made during a visit to the Crow Nation in May 2008 to host an annual summit with tribal leaders to ensure tribal leaders a seat at the proverbial governmental table.

According to the White House, this year’s conference, which is the final conference of Obama’s presidency, marks the historic progress his Administration has made to strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship and build a more prosperous and resilient Indian Country.

In addition to the WHTNC, the second annual White House Tribal Youth Gathering will be held on Tuesday September 27, 2016 as part of the Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) initiative.

According to a release, the youth gathering will bring together approximately 100 Native youth leaders who will participate alongside tribal leaders and senior federal leaders in breakout sessions, panels, and youth-specific programming. Since the President launched Gen-I in 2014, thousands of American Indian and Alaska Native Youth have mobilized to address the most pressing needs facing their communities. Through youth engagement and strategic investments and policies, Gen-I has helped cultivate a new generation of tribal leaders and improve the lives of Native youth.

At the beginning of the WHTNC, tribal leaders and youth gave blessings, drummed and sang and introduced Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. Jewell expressed appreciation for her tenure as secretary which will end in January 2017 and became openly emotional when she thanked the tribal nations for working with her during her position.

The White House is live streaming and will archive the WHTNC here.  https://www.whitehouse.gov/live

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/26/white-house-outlines-massive-outreach-indian-country-tribal-nations-conference-165903   Here is the plan of action as released in its entirety by the White House press office:
Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/26/white-house-outlines-massive-outreach-indian-country-tribal-nations-conference-165903 White House plan of Action, Continued, next post.


Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 30, 2016, 01:42:34 AM
Yowbarb Note: The plan is lengthy. The system here won't let me post all of it. :) Article link below

Indian Country Today media network article, White House Outlines Massive Outreach to Indian Country at Tribal Nations Conference

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/26/white-house-outlines-massive-outreach-indian-country-tribal-nations-conference-165903

White House plan of Action

Vincent Schilling
9/26/16

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on September 30, 2016, 01:48:06 AM
https://www.facebook.com/nodakotaaccess/  Standing Rock #nodapl Stop Dakota Access Pipeline
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 27, 2016, 10:00:28 PM
https://cldc.org/2016/10/26/update-militarized-police-presence-at-standing-rock/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 02, 2016, 11:18:01 PM
Standing Rock Rising
3 hrs
Not exactly the scene John The Baptist would expect at a morning water ceremony.
Today after morning water ceremony, peaceful protestors made their way over a makeshift bridge to Turtle Mountain, a sacred burial hill located just NorthEast of camp to pray to their ancestors. They were met with more violence and assault by local law enforcement officers. The land they were heading to was Army Corp land which the police do not have jurisdiction and the water is neutral territory. Everything about the police actions today shows nothing but corruption, and treason against the US government, and the treaty rights they have signed, and sworn to uphold.
Welcome to America. The American dream is a police state.
Turtle Island will rise.
-Redhawk
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on November 03, 2016, 05:42:32 PM
Makes one so ashamed of what our country has become.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 05, 2016, 08:28:07 PM
Makes one so ashamed of what our country has become.
:'(
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 05, 2016, 08:32:15 PM
Browne and Raitt will be joined by Joel Rafael and Bad Dog to perform at Prairie Knights Pavilion in Fort Yates, North Dakota, according to a press release issued today.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/jackson-browne-bonnie-raitt-holding-benefit-concert-standing/story?id=43324061

Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt Holding Benefit Concert at Standing Rock Supporting Dakota Pipeline Protests

By MORGAN WINSOR
Nov 5, 2016, 11:55 AM ET
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 06, 2016, 06:34:53 AM
Update: The Standing Rock protests are on un- ceded Treaty Lands!
Info from pbutter72

These are recent FB posts.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 28, 2016, 01:24:08 AM
Standing Rock Water Protectors Attacked - Kevin Gilbertt Livestream 1

https://youtu.be/gXrO-hFD-YE

Published on Nov 20, 2016
No DAPL. Water is sacred, water is life.
All live streams from Kevin Gilbertt in a playlist. This footage belongs to Kevin. https://www.facebook.com/kevin.happychappy
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 28, 2016, 01:36:00 AM
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/10/morton-co-police-strip-search-lakota.html?m=1

Morton Co. Police Strip Search Lakota Woman, Leave in Jail Cell Naked  video

LaDonna Brave Bull Allard describes how Morton County police arrested her daughter, without any cause. She was strip searched by male officers and left naked in a jail cell all night.
Article by Brenda Norrell
Censored News
English, Spanish translation by Dr. Villanueva
Video by TYT Politics

STANDING ROCK, North Dakota -- Morton County police and jail guards are violating human rights and engaged in militarized sexual violence, as they illegally strip search Lakotas who are defending the Missouri River, and ancestral burial places, from Dakota Access Pipeline.
LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, who owns the land where Sacred Stone Camp is located, said her daughter was strip searched, and left naked in a jail cell all night.
"They are targeting our families," Allard said.
Allard describes how Morton County police followed a car that her daughter, an adult, was riding in. Her daughter was a passenger in the back seat.
She was arrested with no cause given and taken to Morton County Jail.
"Three male officers, and one female officer stripped her naked. Then they took her naked and put her in a jail cell and left her there all night."
Then, in the morning, they came in and gave her a jump suit.
When Allard questioned what the charge was, Morton Co. continually changed their response
as to what the charge is. Morton Co. made various claims about charges, including speeding, but her daughter wasn't driving, and attempted to charge $500 for "living at the camp," and then Morton Co. basically said they didn't like her attitude.
Allard said, "They are targeting our families."
"They are using every means necessary," said Allard, pointing out how everyone is monitored by helicopters and planes overhead, and at the checkpoints.
"We have to stop them."
Allard said the pipeline has to be stopped. It can not be allowed to destroy these sacred places.
"If we don't stand up now, there will be nothing left of our people."
"Once that water is gone, there's no one who is going to come and help us," said Allard of the Missouri River and Cannon Ball River, which converge here.
"We exist, we live with the land," she said, adding that her people live on the land, and hunt and fish.
"We have to face the storm. We are not backing down."
Allard describes the escalation of events, which now includes police in riot gear and tanks present while those camped at Standing Rock camp are praying for the water.
"Not anybody, anybody, in these camps are violent."
As Dakota Access Pipeline rushes now to meet its deadline with construction, Allard said the pipeline must be stopped.
Allard describes the water and the right to live.
Asked about the burial places here, Allard said her son, father and cousin are buried here, up on the hill. She describes who is buried here in these grounds.
Describing this area, she said that this was a Sundance ground and a major trade area. The entire area is a cultural property.
Allard describes how the fight is for survival, and this survival depends on the water and the river.
"We have a right to live."
...
https://trofire.com/2016/11/27/sen-cory-booker-calls-doj-investigate-oil-police-brutality-dakota-access-pipeline/

Sen. Cory Booker Calls for DOJ to Investigate Oil Police Brutality at Dakota Access Pipeline
November 27, 2016
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 28, 2016, 02:34:16 AM
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/10/morton-co-police-strip-search-lakota.html?m=1

Also see:
Democracy Now! Actress Shailene Woodley strip searched. Arrested while live streaming water protectors.
http://www.democracynow.org/2016/10/20/actress_shailene_woodley_reveals_she_was

Militarized sexual violence:
1) See this link from Rutgers University (Center for Women's Global Leadership) too where they talk about the "Intersection of violence against women and militarism" there is a chapter about violence exercised by the state. http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/docman/violence-against-women-publications/387-intersectionsvaw-militarism-pdf-1/file

"States employ militaristic ideologies that attempt to pass off violence as security measures" on page 6.  Another quote I liked was: "Political violence against women is also used as a tactic to frighten women from joining political movements." (page 6). Another is: "Sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations is used to reinforce gendered hierarchies. It is also used as a tactic of war to drive fear, humiliate and punish women, their families and communities"(page 7). This seems to be obviously the case here, targeting women that are family members of the woman owner of the land, is a militaristic tactic to frighten women from joining the current political movement at Standing Rock. Its a type of psychological terrorism on US land perpetrated by state police who are serving a private oil company instead of the public.

2) It is quite a paradox that the UN is having a campaign to end gender violence this year, starting Nov 25th, and the USA is showing such an embarrassing example of the opposite. http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/ending-violence-against-women/take-action/16-days-of-activism  It would be quite shocking if the UN was invited to Morton to organize an orange campaign against violence against women by state actors, especially if perpetrated by agents of Morton county police: http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/in-focus/end-violence-against-women

3) The specific case described in this article falls under the "violence against women in custody" of this link: http://www.amnestyusa.org/our-work/issues/women-s-rights/violence-against-women/violence-against-women-information.

4) This situation resembles the horror stories told by native american woman, Rigoberta Menchu, from Guatemala, and the horrors lived by indigenous women in Mexico today. There is no doubt that this was an "arbitrary detention" and a case of "gender-based violence" as described in this article narrating violence against women human right defenders protecting land and resources. http://www.lawg.org/action-center/lawg-blog/69-general/1057-from-survivors-to-defenders-violence-against-women-on-the-rise-in-mexico-honduras-guatemala. This is scary similar to the arbitrary detention of 11 native american women in Atenco Mexico ( 2016) defending their lands against the construction of a new airport for Mexico City , who were raped by police as a punishment for participating in political activism. This is a famous case that has reached the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) because there was no investigation by Mexican police (obviously):http://www.ipsnews.net/2010/10/mexico-four-years-on-no-justice-for-atenco-women/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 07:18:43 PM
Well folks, hopefully this is now over and there will be NO pipeline across the Native American's sacred burial sites, over land that should be theirs, (un-ceded treaty land stolen back.)
WOW!!
...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 07:37:02 PM
Yowbarb Note: About 3,000 US Veterans arrived at the Standing Rock Camp to protect the Water Protectors.

SEE Video protesters, water protectors celebrating. The PTB of a new administration could restart the pipeline - I hope not.
...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/04/army-will-deny-easement-halting-work-on-dakota-access-pipeline/?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_dakotaaccess-522pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.553fdd703b12

The Army says it won't grant easement at Standing Rock

The Army said Sunday that it will not approve an easement necessary to permit the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, marking a monumental victory for the Native American tribes and thousands of others who have flocked in recent months to protest the oil pipeline.

“I’m happy as heck,” said Everett Iron Eyes, a retired director of natural resources for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and one of the organizers of a camp protesters set up near the pipeline site. “All our prayers have been answered.”

Officials in November had delayed the key decision, saying more discussion was necessary about the proposed crossing, given that it would pass very near the reservation of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, whose leaders have repeatedly expressed fears that a spill could threaten the water supplies of its people.

“Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it’s clear that there’s more work to do,” Jo-Ellen Darcy, the Army’s assistant secretary for civil works, said in a statement Sunday. “The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.”
The decision averts a possible showdown on Monday, the date the Army Corps, which owns land on either side of the lake, had set for cutting off access to the protesters’ camp. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, worried about violence, had sent mediators to the area over the weekend.

The victory for the Standing Rock Sioux and its allies could be short-lived, though. President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to support pipelines such as this one. And Kelcy Warren, the chief executive of the pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners, has been a major contributor to the Republican Party and Trump’s campaign.

Trump, who once owned a stake worth between $500,000 and $1 million in Energy Transfer Partners, has sold the shares, his spokeswoman Hope Hicks said. At the time of his most recent disclosure statement in May, Trump owned $100,000 to $250,000 of stock in Phillips 66, which has a 25 percent stake in the Dakota Access project.

Iron Eyes said that “we shall remain vigilant regardless. We have witnessed the power of being peaceful and prayerful.”

What started as a small but fierce protest in a remote spot along the Missouri River months ago has evolved into an epic standoff involving hundreds of tribes, various celebrities and activists from around the country. It has involved heated confrontations — police have sometimes employed water cannons, pepper spray and rubber bullets — and has carried on through the swelter of summer into the snowy cold of winter. Hundreds of veterans arrived in recent days.

Iron Eyes said that “we shall remain vigilant regardless. We have witnessed the power of being peaceful and prayerful.”

What started as a small but fierce protest in a remote spot along the Missouri River months ago has evolved into an epic standoff involving hundreds of tribes, various celebrities and activists from around the country. It has involved heated confrontations — police have sometimes employed water cannons, pepper spray and rubber bullets — and has carried on through the swelter of summer into the snowy cold of winter. Hundreds of veterans arrived in recent days.
[Continued, next post, YB)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 08:02:43 PM
(Yowbarb Note: I heard it was 3,000 US Veterans who went to Standing Rock to protect the protestors.)

At Least 2,000 Veterans Arrive at Standing Rock to Protest Dakota Pipeline

By MICHAEL EDISON HAYDEN CATHERINE THORBECKE EVAN SIMON
Dec 4, 2016, 2:29 PM ET

At least 2,000 U.S. military veterans have arrived at Standing Rock amid frigid cold to help battle against the Dakota Access oil pipeline.
The vets, led by Wesley Clark Jr., son of retired general and former presidential candidate Wesley Clark, began arriving in force today to help protest against the controversial crude oil pipeline project in North Dakota.

They are joining the months-long demonstration at a moment of heightened drama: The North Dakota governor has issued an emergency evacuation order for protesters around the site, which follows a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deadline for demonstrators to leave the area by Monday, Dec. 5.

But protesters and their supporters have shown little inclination to back down. Donations to a GoFundMe account launched by Clark in support of Veterans for Standing Rock, a group he claims will "assemble as a peaceful, unarmed militia at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation," have passed the $1 million dollar mark, coming from more than 24,000 individual donors, according to a page promoting the cause.

Standing Rock protesters have described the veterans' mission as serving as a kind of "human shield" between peaceful demonstrators and police.

Clark posted an image to his Twitter account Dec. 1 with a photo of the American flag folded along his dashboard with a wintry Western sky in the background. Accompanying the image, Clark wrote: "We're coming."

Chicago native David Hulse, 34, a Navy veteran who served in Iraq told ABC News that he decided at the last minute to join the protests, describing his involvement as "not a mission of war, but a mission of peace."  "Seeing so many veterans show up," Hulse said. "Out here, it's brotherhood."
Hulse added that the goal of protecting Native American protesters at the site is "a frightening task," but he said he hopes to serve as a witness.
"Violence will not end violence," he said. "Peace will end violence."
Hulse said a 90-year-old man is among the veterans who have arrived at Standing Rock.

Among the veterans are some high-profile names, including U.S. Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, Democrat of Hawaii, who gained prominence when she left the Democratic National Committee to campaign for Sen. Bernie Sanders during his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination this year. Gabbard has frequently voiced support for the Dakota Access protest movement over social media.

In addition to Clark's "peaceful militia," the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights told ABC News on Friday that it would send commissioners to North Dakota to monitor for any possible civil rights violations, as clashes between protesters and law enforcement have at times turned violent.

One protester Sophia Wilansky, 21, of New York was severely injured following a clash between demonstrators and law enforcement on Nov. 20. Her father, Wayne Wilansky, told The Associated Press last month that his daughter's arm was seriously hurt when law enforcement threw a grenade in her vicinity. But the Morton County Sheriff's Office said authorities did not use any concussion grenades and suggested that an explosion heard during the skirmish might have been caused by small propane tanks that authorities said protesters had rigged to explode, the AP reported.  A GoFundMe account seeking assistance for Wilansky's medical treatment has brought in more than $417,000 to date.

Native American groups and environmental activists have been protesting since summer to block construction of the 1,172-mile pipeline that is slated to cut across four states and transport crude oil from North Dakota's oil fields to refinery markets in Illinois. The activists, who call themselves "water protectors," say that the pipeline traverses culturally sacred sites and poses a risk to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's water supply.

North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple issued an emergency evacuation order for the site after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave protesters until Dec. 5 to leave Corps-managed land.

In response to the state order, Standing Rock Sioux leader Dave Archambault II, called on the United Nations and President Obama to "take immediate action to prohibit North Dakota from engaging in its retaliatory actions and practices." in response to the mandatory evacuation order issued for demonstrators by North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple earlier this week.

“This week is the anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre. It’s time for the United States to end its legacy of abuses against Native Americans," Archambault said in a statement Thursday. “As a tribal nation, we call on the president to take all the appropriate steps to ensure water protectors are safe and that their rights to free speech and peaceful assembly are protected."

Archambault said this weekend that he has accepted the governor's invitation to meet about the pipeline but no date had yet been set, according to the Bismarck Tribune.

[Continues....]  Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II greets the Dakota Access Pipeline opponents Thursday:

(https://www.sayanythingblog.com/files/2016/08/0b5bebmedyj9vunntb3znb00tafu.jpg)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 08:40:10 PM
Second part of article...and the fight not necessarily over...
...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/04/army-will-deny-easement-halting-work-on-dakota-access-pipeline/?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_dakotaaccess-522pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.42663946c312

Rhea Suh, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the outcome was a reminder of the power of individuals to “demand environmental justice.” She said, “Today, the voices of indigenous people were heard.”

In the Dakota language, the word “oahe” signifies “a place to stand on.”

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and its allies in the environmental and activist movements had said they were doing just that: using Lake Oahe in North Dakota as a place to take a stand by setting up camps and obstructing roads to block the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline.

The steel pipeline, developed and majority owned by Energy Transfer Partners, would connect the Bakken and Three Forks oil production areas in North Dakota to an existing crude oil terminal and pipeline terminus in Illinois. At 30 inches in diameter, it could transport an estimated 470,000 to 570,000 barrels of oil per day.

The company says the project, which traverses four states, is 92 percent complete overall and 99 percent complete in North Dakota.

Army officials said that the consideration of alternative routes would be best accomplished through an environmental-impact statement with full public input and analysis, a process likely to take many months.

Ordinarily, the Army Corps, which has jurisdiction over domestic petroleum pipelines, does not require a detailed environmental-impact statement but it does require environmental assessments of the impact on water crossings.
[Voices from Standing Rock: A glimpse into both sides of the standoff]http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2016/12/02/voices-from-standing-rock/?tid=a_inl

Continuing: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/04/army-will-deny-easement-halting-work-on-dakota-access-pipeline/?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_dakotaaccess-522pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.42663946c312

....
Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, however, praised the Army’s decision.

“The thoughtful approach established by the Army today ensures that there will be an in-depth evaluation of alternative routes for the pipeline and a closer look at potential impacts,” she said Sunday. “The Army’s announcement underscores that tribal rights reserved in treaties and federal law, as well as Nation-to-Nation consultation with tribal leaders, are essential components of the analysis to be undertaken in the environmental impact statement going forward.”

Derek Hawkins contributed to this report from a camp near Cannonball, N.D.

Brady Dennis is a national reporter for The Washington Post, focusing on the environment and public health issues.  Follow @brady_dennis
Steven Mufson covers energy and other financial matters. Since joining The Post, he has covered the White House, China, economic policy and diplomacy. Follow @StevenMufson.  Follow @StevenMufson



Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 09:09:48 PM
VIDEO Veterans for Standing Rock Respond to Army Corps of Engineers Denial of DAPL Permit (12/4/2016)

https://youtu.be/sKd5D6XPAeU

Published on Dec 4, 2016
Mystic Dave

#VeteransForStandingRock #WaterProtectors #NoDAPL This Live Stream was provided by #NoDAPL Warrior Bucky Harjo...Veterans March in Response to Army Corps of Engineers Denial of DAPL Permit...Check out Bucky Harjo on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bucky.harjo #StandingRock #WaterIsLife #KeepItInTheGround #WeAreTheMedia #MniWiconi #TheWorldIsWatching #OcetiSakowinCamp #StandingWithStandingRock #PrayerAndShare
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 04, 2016, 11:59:51 PM
Yowbarb Note: On this video, start about five minutes in. They were having some problems coordinating for airtime and not much happening in the beginning. 5:21 Danny Sheehan starts making his statements. He said President Obama gave the order to the Secretary of the Army to deny the easement to DAPL, for or the Pipeline at Standing Rock.

Update From #NoDAPL Attorneys Daniel Sheehan & Chase Iron Eyes on DAPL Permit Denial (12/4/2016)    23:58

https://youtu.be/fKYYt4EQEKM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2016, 12:30:13 AM
This video from Mary Greeley is from Dec 02, 2016 when the veterans began arriving at Standing Rock.
...
6,000 plus, hundreds of veterans arrive to support Dakota Access protests 11:18  8,327 views

https://youtu.be/c9c2f0sAtko

Published on Dec 2, 2016
December 2, 2016 – Scores of military veterans have begun arriving to take part in the North Dakota pipeline protest, with hundreds, possibly thousands more expected, including a US congresswoman.
Read more here,
http://marygreeley.com/?page_id=41074

Thank you to everyone for the moral and financial support for my work. God Bless everyone.
If you wish to help, please share.
Secure PayPal donations through PayPal
marygreeley54@gmail.com
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on December 05, 2016, 05:35:37 PM
Well folks, hopefully this is now over and there will be NO pipeline across the Native American's sacred burial sites, over land that should be theirs, (un-ceded treaty land stolen back.)
WOW!!
...

Best news of this century!  And what a relief, as I just read about 30 minutes ago a quote from Trump saying the DAPipeline would "go through".  Let's hope he cannot use Executive Orders to undo what the Army has put in place.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2016, 09:12:56 PM
Well folks, hopefully this is now over and there will be NO pipeline across the Native American's sacred burial sites, over land that should be theirs, (un-ceded treaty land stolen back.)
WOW!!
...

Best news of this century!  And what a relief, as I just read about 30 minutes ago a quote from Trump saying the DAPipeline would "go through".  Let's hope he cannot use Executive Orders to undo what the Army has put in place.
It is to me, very good news. I do understand the people who are not happy about it but after all, the pipeline company has enough money to re-route it. He did issue a statement that the pipeline would go through...I am not sure but I think he meant  through Standing Rock. Trump is invested in DAPL and the owner of the Co is invested in Trump industries...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 05, 2016, 09:29:40 PM
Snow Storm Has Just Arrived At Standing Rock 12/5/16 Update  12:31  1,629 views

https://youtu.be/rb6AZcTxnd8

Published on Dec 5, 2016
12/5/16 | #Nodapl Archives
Credit: Digital Smoke Signals
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 06, 2016, 07:36:21 PM
Yowbarb Note:
Just going to be posting a few dancing or ceremonial videos from Standing Rock
...
Indian Jingle Dance at Standing Rock Dakota Access Pipeline #NoDAPL Protest

https://youtu.be/xkvsKGAJayI

Videosiana
Published on Oct 31, 2016
Today at Standing Rock Dakota Access Pipeline Protest (documentary), many women participated in a sacred ceremonial Women's Indian jingle dance and this was the first time it was allowed to be recorded. The dancers invited the media to record it because they want the healing power to be shared with the world. On Facebook, hundreds of thousands of people check in at #StandingRock. #NoDAPL
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 06, 2016, 08:07:55 PM
Tribes from far away participating at Standing Rock.
...
Aztec Dancers at Standing Rock..  7:57

https://youtu.be/pywifcMNTHQ

Marlene Breilyn
Published on Oct 12, 2016
When I was up at the Oceti Sakowin camp, I took a lot of videos. This is one of them.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 06, 2016, 08:46:28 PM
Veterans marched on Veterans Day 2016 at Standing Rock  5:29

https://youtu.be/XYTQ5zyIHz8

Published on Nov 11, 2016
11/11/16
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 11, 2016, 05:58:56 PM
US VETERAN arrested standing in solidarity with water protectors at the Sabal Trail Pipeline in FL.  5:07    1,322 views

https://youtu.be/NDbJQoDS0mE

Published on Dec 10, 2016
12/10/16 | #Nodapl Archives
Credit: Meg Tullos
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 16, 2016, 02:01:31 AM
Late Nite Update Live From Standing Rock (12/14/2016) Digital Smoke Signals  21:39  1,840 views
Mystic Dave

https://youtu.be/l94MmoRooKI

Published on Dec 14, 2016
#NoDAPL #WaterProtectors #WeAreTheMedia Late Nite Update Live from Standing Rock provided by #NoDAPL Warriors Digital Smoke Signals..."Digital Smoke Signals Update at Oceti Sakowin"...
#StandingRock #KeepItInTheGround #PeoplePower #MniWiconi #TheWorldIsWatching #OcetiSakowinCamp #StandingWithStandingRock #PrayerAndShare #VeteransForStandingRock
Check out Digital Smoke Signals on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/DigitalSmokeSignals/?

GoFundMe page to support Digital Smoke Signals-Even if you can or cannot support Mr. Dewey. Then at the very least go the the GoFundMe page and hit the heart button of everyone who donated. Share his page everywhere. Also, share on a regular basis on Twitter and Facebook. Yes, it is tedious but necessary. https://www.gofundme.com/waterissacred?rcid=a59c2e6337f240298aae3e0c57b011f9
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on December 30, 2016, 01:01:18 AM
Standing Rock Update (12/29/2016) On A Prayer Walk-Still Headed Towards The Drill Pad 5:15

https://youtu.be/FitSVKK3Qso

Mystic Dave
Published on Dec 29, 2016
#NoDAPL #WaterProtectors #WeAreTheMedia Live Update provided by #NoDAPL Warrior Tawasi ..."On a prayer walk...Still heading towards the drill pad."...

Check out Tawasi on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tawasi

Donate to The Water Protector Legal Collective: Water Protector Legal Collective (formerly Red Owl) is the nonprofit legal organization on-site at the #NoDAPL resistance camps. We partner with the National Lawyers Guild (NLG) to coordinate criminal and civil litigation, serving all water protectors. https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/11B5z8

#WaterIsLife #StandingRock #KeepItInTheGround #PeoplePower #MniWiconi #TheWorldIsWatching #OcetiSakowinCamp #SacredStoneCamp #StandingWithStandingRock #PrayerAndShare #DefendTheSacred

Check out my blogs:
Mystical Poetry and Politics: http://www.mysticalpoetryandpolitics.com/

Mystical Musings and Politics: http://mysticalmusingsandpolitics.blogspot.com/

Watch Ancient Aliens Online:   http://watchancientaliensonline.blogspot.com/
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 01, 2017, 01:03:14 AM
Yowbarb Note: It takes a few minutes to gt this update off the ground...worthwhile content.

Standing Rock Update (12/30/2016) Call To All Warriors  26:49   1,500 views

https://youtu.be/S6g1dhSK-Gg

Mystic Dave
Published on Dec 30, 2016
#NoDAPL #WaterProtectors #WeAreTheMedia Veteran Camp Protector and Brave #NoDAPL Warrior Michael Markus gives us a live update from Standing Rock..."Call To All Warriors"...

Check out Michael Markus on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/michael.markus.9
Donate to The Water Protector Legal Collective: Water Protector Legal Collective (formerly Red Owl) is the nonprofit legal organization on-site at the #NoDAPL resistance camps. We partner with the National Lawyers Guild (NLG) to coordinate criminal and civil litigation, serving all water protectors.
https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/11B5z8
#StandingRock #WaterIsLife #KeepItInTheGround #VeteransForStandingRock #MniWiconi #TheWorldIsWatching #OcetiSakowinCamp #SacredStoneCamp #StandingWithStandingRock #PrayerAndShare #PeoplePower

[ More links  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6g1dhSK-Gg ]
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 08, 2017, 12:24:35 AM
Veterans at Standing Rock Dec 5 #NoDAPL  3:10      339 views

https://youtu.be/a5kC3R2yD8M   

J Grady
Published on Jan 7, 2017
We've joined a coalition (including 350.org, Daily Kos, Indigenous Environmental Network, and many more) that is committed to keeping the pressure on the 17 banks who are funding DAPL. Please stand with us in this historic moment and #DefundDAPL.
Copyright Disclaimer:
Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 08, 2017, 12:36:29 AM
From Stonehenge to Standing Rock  11:49    280 views

https://youtu.be/bVzQhsCPLQA

Published on Jan 7, 2017
As the future of Standing Rock emerges and unfolds, both in terms of the fight against DAPL and the birthing of a long term Cultural Education Centre there, know that the world is watching and so many of us are inspired by what you are doing and how you are doing it! This video of our gathering at Stonehenge hopefully captures how much you are affecting us and how much love there is being sent back your way. As Chief Arvol Looking Horse says, "All nations, all faiths, one prayer." #waterislife #mniwiconi xxx
The soul-soothing music is by Eleanor Brown at www.eleanorbrownmusic.com.
 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 08, 2017, 05:57:24 PM
Live From Standing Rock (1/3/2017) Updates With #NoDAPL Warrior Brandon Green

https://youtu.be/EFllCtrdZFk

Published on Jan 3, 2017
#NoDAPL #DeFundDAPL #WeAreTheMedia Live stream provided by #NoDAPL Warrior Brandon Green with Hunkpapa Lakota..."Update from the ground"...

Check out Brandon Green on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/intrikitbeatz

Check out Hunkpapa Lakota on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/hunkpapa.lakota.3

GoFundMe page to support Gas and Lumber for #NODAPL Camps-Leighton Thompson is a local in North Dakota who dedicates his free time to cutting lumber for the camps to have heat. During these cold winters, it is vital to the survival of many people. He needs help funding for gas to transport the lumber and for the gas and supplies to run his chainsaws:
https://www.gofundme.com/gas-and-lumber-4-standing-rock
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: NativeMom72 on February 07, 2017, 10:05:45 AM
Many Thanks to YowBarb for posting these informative articles, pictures, and links!

Most recent news on the Dakota Access Pipeline:

From Dallas Goldtooth, one of the organizers from the Indigenous Environmental Network

"Today during a federal court status conference, DOJ lawyers told the Judge that the Corps has forwarded a "review and analysis" to the Army leadership for a decision on the easement. They did not state what that decision was of course. They expect to announce the decision as early as friday.
Once the Army makes a decision it goes to Congress for notification. While Army policy is to wait 14 days after notification, the Presidential memo says waive that waiting period, and the DOJ did not indicate its position on this either.
The other fact that came out today under the Court's questioning is that it would take DAPL a minimum of 83 days from the start of construction until the pipeline is fully in operation. After 60 days there could be some oil in the pipeline underneath Lake Oahe.
----
In layman terms. The department of army will most likely released its determination on the easement this Friday. Whereupon the tribal immediately file for an injunction."


Source:
https://www.facebook.com/dallasgoldtooth (https://www.facebook.com/dallasgoldtooth)

More on the Indigenous Environmental Network:
http://www.ienearth.org (http://www.ienearth.org)
 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 07, 2017, 10:49:46 PM
NativeMom72, truth Be Told, I've hardly had the heart to keep up with this lately...
Last video I got a glimpse of was chilling, with armed police force slowly moving though the Standing Rock Camp, looked like they were backing people out. That report said 76 people arrested and that was a few days ago. I don't have that link...
The DOJ is a new appointee from Trump and Trump has stated he is bound and determined to put that pipeline through, exactly there.  We will see what happens. Will post something more complete soon. Meanwhile, here is the latest Digital Smoke Signals, about 2 hours ago:
...
Live From Standing Rock With Digital Smoke Signals (2/7/2017) DAPL Drill Pad Drone Footage  4:45    147 views

About 2 hours ago:
Mystic Dave2
https://youtu.be/FEMCHMdHyMk

Published on Feb 7, 2017
Live stream provided by Digital Smoke Signals..."West Side Drill Pad"...
Credit-Digital Smoke Signals: https://www.facebook.com/DigitalSmokeSignals/

Standing Rock Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3GKF702p6ybEkG_7FVScS50VHaxQsAKJ
Standing Rock Archives: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrOIxZ67enVS0oL8HVPIZ4m5h__4_eAM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 09, 2017, 02:05:46 AM
1 week ago:
...
Drone footage of police in the process of raiding the Standing Rock camps 10:31  5,535 views

411 TRUTH
video link: https://youtu.be/RnhNL5_z-k0

Published on Feb 1, 2017
DONATE TO STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE AND CREATE AWARENESS WITH CLOTHING!
https://teespring.com/stores/nodapl-100-to-donations
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 09, 2017, 02:15:19 AM
Drone Footage From Standing Rock With Digital Smoke Signals (2/8/2017) Turtle Island
Mystic Dave2

https://youtu.be/1IF5nWdft-Q

Published on Feb 8, 2017
Live stream provided by Digital Smoke Signals..."Turtle Island"...

Credit-Digital Smoke Signals: https://www.facebook.com/DigitalSmokeSignals/

Standing Rock Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3GKF702p6ybEkG_7FVScS50VHaxQsAKJ

Standing Rock Archives:   https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrOIxZ67enVS0oL8HVPIZ4m5h__4_eAM 
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 21, 2017, 02:42:00 AM
https://youtu.be/BcCEKjPW_tM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on February 21, 2017, 01:19:53 PM
Thanks for keeping us updated, yowbarb.  There are so many updates on Standing Rock and things related, that it's hard to know which is the latest, etc.  Here is yet another; they could omit the background music AFAIC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7jidzXLsTM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 22, 2017, 06:25:19 PM
Thanks for keeping us updated, yowbarb.  There are so many updates on Standing Rock and things related, that it's hard to know which is the latest, etc.  Here is yet another; they could omit the background music AFAIC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7jidzXLsTM

Thanks ilinda, I will watch that. i have not been able to properly post for a couple days, only copy paste something...
Loaned my keyboard out. I'm back.
Things are not looking so hopeful, IMHO with big oil wanting to encroach upon native lands and lands they consider sacred, adjacent to theirs...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 23, 2017, 01:57:52 AM
Yowbarb Note: After being forced out, after a ceremony, Native American pipeline protesters set remnants of camp ablaze, Feb 22, 2017.
...
10 hours ago:

https://www.yahoo.com/celebrity/last-remnants-dakota-access-pipeline-232742565.html

Last Remnants of Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp Are Engulfed in Flames

Blake Nicholson and James MacPherson / AP, People

(CANNON BALL, N.D.) — Some of the last remnants of the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp went up in flames Wednesday as opponents of the project set fire to makeshift wooden housing as part of a leaving ceremony ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land.

The camp has been home to demonstrators for six months as they tried to thwart construction of the pipeline. Many of the protesters planned to go peacefully, but authorities were prepared to arrest others who said they would defy the deadline in a final show of dissent.

About 150 people marched arm-in-arm out of the camp, singing and playing drums as they walked down a highway. It was not clear where they were headed. One man carried an American flag hung upside-down.

Others departed the soggy camp earlier in the day. Authorities sent buses to take protesters to Bismarck, where they were offered fresh clothing, bus fare home and food and hotel vouchers.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers set a 2 p.m. Wednesday deadline for the camp to be cleared, citing the threat of spring flooding.

At the height of the protests, the site known as Oceti Sakowin hosted thousands of people, though its population dwindled to just a couple of hundred as the pipeline battle moved into the courts.

The camp is on federal land in North Dakota between the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and the pipeline route that is being finished by Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners. When complete, the project will carry oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

Some of the remaining protesters were focused on moving off federal land and away from the flood plain into other camps, said Phyllis Young, one of the camp leaders.

“The camps will continue,” she said. “Freedom is in our DNA, and we have no choice but to continue the struggle.”

New camps are popping up on private land, including one the Cheyenne River Sioux set up about a mile from the main camp.

“A lot of our people want to be here and pray for our future,” tribal Chairman Harold Frazier said.

Others, including Dom Cross, an Oglala Sioux from Pine Ridge, South Dakota, said he planned to return home after living at the camp since September.

“There’s a lot of sadness right now. We have to leave our second home,” he said.

Law enforcement officers and first-responders were on hand from several states.

Charles Whalen, 50, an alcohol and drug counselor from Mille Lacs, Minnesota, said he and a group of about 20 people were not going to leave on their own and were willing to get arrested to prove their point.

“Passive resistance,” Whalen said. “We are not going to do anything negative. It’s about prayer.”

Levi Bachmeier, policy adviser for Gov. Doug Burgum, said authorities would rather not apprehend people, but they would enforce the deadline.

The state “remains committed to ensuring the safety of everyone here,” Bachmeier said. “The last thing we want is to see anyone harmed.”

Some campers said they were leaving with mixed feelings, both energized by the long protest and saddened to leave new friends. Some people set off fireworks.

Matthew Bishop, of Ketchikan, Alaska, has been in North Dakota since October. He planned to move to another camp.

“People have been surviving here for hundreds and hundreds of years … so if I back down, what would I look like?” Bishop said as he tied his possessions to the top of his car.

Craig Stevens, spokesman for the MAIN Coalition of agriculture, business and labor interests, said the group understands “the passions that individuals on all sides of the pipeline discussion feel” and hopes that protesters’ voices “will continue to be heard through other peaceful channels and in court.”

A massive effort to clean up the camp has been underway for weeks, first by protesters themselves and now with help from the Army Corps in removing debris.

Some vehicles and pedestrians were having trouble getting through the muck created by recent rain and snow, and cleanup efforts were suspended in part because camp officials did not want heavy equipment making the conditions worse.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on February 24, 2017, 10:07:07 PM
Yowbarb Note: This is the day before the  Standing Rock No DAPL Dakota Access pipeline protest camp was shut down by authorities. In the end, most people left, forced out. About 40 people were arrested. Before that, there was a ceremony and members of the camp burned it down.

Drone Footage Of Oceti Raid Part 1 (2/23/2017) Live From Standing Rock With Stephanie Big-Eagle  15:24

https://youtu.be/YHUmqAFrtGE

Published on Feb 23, 2017
Live stream provided by Stephanie Big-Eagle with Ernesto Burbank..."Oceti Raid heavily armored law enforcement and military vehicles"...

Credit-Stephanie Big-Eagle: https://www.facebook.com/StephBigEagle
Standing Rock Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3GKF702p6ybEkG_7FVScS50VHaxQsAKJ

Standing Rock Archives:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrOIxZ67enVS0oL8HVPIZ4m5h__4_eAM
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 01, 2017, 12:58:25 AM
Water protectors singing one last time at Oceti Sakowin camp before the eviction at 2pm. 14:17

https://youtu.be/7AOwflBEaYQ

Published on Feb 23, 2017
Water protectors singing one last time at Oceti Sakowin camp before the eviction at 2pm. #nodapl #honortheearth #waterislife
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 01, 2017, 01:15:30 AM
Next Steps for Standing Rock  6:56 

https://youtu.be/tSFkYAdJ4LQ

Published on Feb 23, 2017
Cedric Goodhouse speaks on the next steps for the Standing Rock movement.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 04, 2017, 05:25:28 PM
Talking about the some of our Native history and the Pipeline  11:30  216 views

video link:

Published on Feb 25, 2017
Talking about the some of our Native history and the Pipeline....... Please subscribe for more. And thank you for being a part of this channel

Asking for donations to keep this Chanel going
https://paypal.me/theoneandonlypowerus
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 04, 2017, 05:33:25 PM
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYv4K91XQeAZ2fZlnehLjfA/videos
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on March 04, 2017, 05:55:35 PM
30th Annual Carolina Indian Circle Powwow  1:22
UNC-Chapel Hill


video link: https://youtu.be/UvzMpigbDuo

Published on Mar 4, 2017
Explore American Indian culture at the 30th Annual Carolina Indian Circle Powwow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 12, 2017, 02:43:16 AM
http://standwithstandingrock.net/category/news/

Sen. Cantwell wants more details on Corps’ Dakota Access decisions
Posted on April 6, 2017

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., wants the chief of the Army Corps of Engineers to explain the agency’s decision-making that ultimately paved the way for completion of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline.

http://standwithstandingrock.net/sen-cantwell-wants-details-corps-dakota-access-decisions/



Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 12, 2017, 02:45:51 AM
http://standwithstandingrock.net/category/news/

Standing Rock Sioux applauds BNP Paribas’ decision to divest from DAPL
Posted on April 5, 2017

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce BNP Paribas has sold its shares in the loan to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

http://standwithstandingrock.net/standing-rock-sioux-applauds-bnp-paribas-decision-divest-dapl/

Cannon Ball, N.D. — The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is pleased to announce BNP Paribas has sold its shares in the loan to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Representatives from the bank contacted the Tribe to share the news on Wednesday, April 5, 2017.

The Tribe commends the bank’s decision, which sends a strong message about the need for banks to respect Free, Prior and Informed Consent in their lending practices. BNP Paribas is the third bank in the DAPL loan consortium to divest, following similar actions by DNB and ING.

“As corporate greed continues to fuel dirty energy projects on our land, it is heartening to see that some banks recognize the imminent harm to our people posed by DAPL, and are taking actions accordingly,” said Dave Archambault, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “We appreciate BNP Paribas, ING and DNB leadership and their advanced understanding and respect of tribal sovereignty and Indigenous Peoples rights.”

The Tribe has met with the majority of project lenders to DAPL, but few have taken concrete actions. Later this month, tribal leaders will attend Wells Fargo’s annual meeting, where shareholders will vote on a proposal instructing the bank to improve its policies and practices on the rights of Indigenous Peoples. Similar proposals are being voted on by shareholders of Enbridge and Marathon Petroleum, two oil companies with minority ownership stakes in DAPL.

The Tribe will continue to pursue divestment, shareholder advocacy and other tactics to show that Energy Transfer Partners’ conduct is unacceptable business practice. The power of people speaking out against the Dakota Access Pipeline is greatly appreciated and today’s announcement by BNP Paribas is proof the fight continues and we look forward to further progress with the investment community, as well as in the courts.

###

Contact:
Chelsea Hawkins
chawkins@pyramidcommunications.com
206.556.1653
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on April 12, 2017, 02:56:27 AM
Cloth - 2016 Pala Pow Wow - PowWows.com  2:49   21 views

Video link:  https://youtu.be/TSnPCh6R66A

Published on Apr 11, 2017
August 26-28, 2016
Pala, California
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 28, 2017, 01:42:45 PM
http://nativenewsonline.net/  NATIVE NEWS ONLINE.NET

Celebrating Native Voices

THIS DAY IN HISTORY – MAY 28, 1830 ANDREW JACKSON SIGNS INDIAN REMOVAL ACT

BY LEVI RICKERT / CURRENTS / 28 MAY 2017

WASHINGTON – On this day in 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act.

The Act established a process whereby the president could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands. As incentives, the law allowed the Indians financial and material assistance to travel to their new locations and start new lives and guaranteed that the Indians would live on their new property under the protection of the United States Government forever.

WITH THE ACT IN PLACE, JACKSON AND HIS FOLLOWERS WERE FREE TO PERSUADE, BRIBE, AND THREATEN TRIBES INTO SIGNING REMOVAL TREATIES AND LEAVING THE SOUTHEAST.

By the end of his presidency, he had signed into law almost seventy removal treaties, the result of which was to move nearly 50,000 eastern Indians to Indian Territory—defined as the region belonging to the United States west of the Mississippi River but excluding the states of Missouri and Iowa as well as the Territory of Arkansas—and open millions of acres of rich land east of the Mississippi to white settlers. Despite the vastness of the Indian Territory, the government intended that the Indians’ destination would be a more confined area—what later became eastern Oklahoma.

The Indian Removal Act set in motion the Trail of Tears, which attributed to the genocide of thousands of American Indians and the death of one-quarter Cherokee people. For this reason, Jackson is referred to by American Indians as the “Indian-killer” president and does not feel he should be honored or celebrated in any fashion.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on May 28, 2017, 06:49:54 PM
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on May 29, 2017, 10:17:03 PM
http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/cheyenne-river-sioux-tribe-chairman-harold-c-frazier-gets-recognition-lakota-people/

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 01:18:41 PM
June 02, 1924 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act into law, granting citizenship to all Native Americans born within the territorial limits of the United States.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Citizenship_Act

The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924, also known as the Snyder Act, was proposed by Representative Homer P. Snyder (R) of New York and granted full U.S. citizenship to America's indigenous peoples, called "Indians" in this Act. While the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution defined as citizens any person born in the U.S., the amendment had been interpreted to restrict the citizenship rights of most Native people. The act was signed into law by President Calvin Coolidge on June 2, 1924. It was enacted partially in recognition of the thousands of Indians who served in the armed forces during World War I.

Legislative history
Introduced in the House as H.R. 6355 by Homer P. Snyder (R-NY) on February 22, 1924
Committee consideration by House Indian Affairs, Senate Indian Affairs
Passed the House on March 18, 1924 (Passed)
Passed the Senate on May 15, 1924 (Passed)
Agreed to by the House on May 23, 1924 (Agreed) and by the on 
Signed into law by President Calvin Coolidge on June 2, 1924

Note: Citizenship was granted in a piecemeal fashion before the Act, which was the first more inclusive method of granting Native American citizenship. The Act did not include citizens born before the effective date of the 1924 act, or outside of the United States as an indigenous person, however, and it was not until the Nationality Act of 1940 that all born on U.S. soil were citizens.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationality_Act_of_1940

[ More  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Citizenship_Act ]
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 01:23:51 PM
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on June 02, 2017, 05:31:42 PM
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 09:53:40 PM
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.

Maybe because it was so Cal but yes it began to be covered at the community college level... 1962 my first Sociology class. The teacher, from England really got into it, the slave ships and all that.  The whole Native American experience seemed to be confronted a bit later.  Perhaps it was a decade later...  The Native American movement was in full swing in the early 19702.
Then when I went back to college again in 1999 perhaps it was the yr 2000 when I first knew over 20 million natives perished from white man's diseases... that is in north America central and south... I had no idea that many had perished.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 10:00:07 PM
THANKS for posting this.  We need to remember this and should be teaching children the truth!

Yes, indeed... the young ones need to know.
Most of this stuff I didn't know until finally in college history... same thing with the treatment of Africans brought to the colonies to be slaves, how they were brought over, etc. learned that finally in college sociology... It's a different world now so many the youngsters learn this stuff sooner in regular school.
I didn't learn any of the truths such as these in high school or college, and it wasn't till years later when I began reading things such as Howard Zinn's excellent book, A People's History of the United States.  Yeah, I got tidbits and glimpses and knew slavery existed, but the bigger picture was never presented, as it was all about white man's so called accomplishments, discoveries, etc., blah blah blah.

You can say that again, blah blah blah... All about white men...Barely mentioned women, even in 1962- 1966. I didn't realize until about 1967 how propagandized we all were... including sexism and racial stereotypes in the movies, etc.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 10:37:08 PM
On that note, time for a Pow wow video. :)
This not recent but it is is a long video:
...
Osage River Pow Wow    7:58    1,094 views

https://youtu.be/gUHtZj9myks

LAKE TV Lake of the Ozarks
Uploaded on Jun 22, 2011
A Lake TV 32 PRODUCTION
In association with Blue Pilot Productions
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 02, 2017, 10:59:49 PM
Journey of the Osage 10:00   22,564 views

https://youtu.be/j_YiHIYmXn8

Uploaded on Apr 22, 2011
Made in conjunction with the Museum's 2004 exhibition entitled Art of the Osage, this video pairs visual imagery with interviews from tribal historians and members to provide a glimpse into the history of the Osage Indians. Using as a reference point the Native American tribe's past, including its forced displacement onto an Oklahoma reservation in the 19th century, the video paints a portrait of a modern, continuously evolving people.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: R.R. Book on June 03, 2017, 08:25:00 AM
Thanks for the lovely vid Barb!  I grew up near there, went to school with Native American kids from different tribes, and have some Cherokee ancestry as well. 

We used Howard Zinn's book as our home-schooling history text, and the boys chose their final research paper topics from passages in the book.  More here by Zinn on Native Americans: http://howardzinn.org/thanksgiving-resistance/







Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2017, 12:40:49 PM
Thanks for the lovely vid Barb!  I grew up near there, went to school with Native American kids from different tribes, and have some Cherokee ancestry as well. 

We used Howard Zinn's book as our home-schooling history text, and the boys chose their final research paper topics from passages in the book.  More here by Zinn on Native Americans: http://howardzinn.org/thanksgiving-resistance/

R.R. I feel that is a wonderful thing, knowing you have Native American heritage!  :)
I have "felt" it since I was about four years old but parents said no... Finally I got a look at a closeup pic of my Grandpa Townsend. He looked to be part Native American and a touch of African American... I think we have hidden roots, middle eastern and sephardic (and Ashkenazi) Jewish. Some roots get lost.  ;)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2017, 03:45:45 PM
Here is one take on Cherokee lineage. Jewish ancestry and origin of many Cherokee people, going back to 1500s, 1600s. Some of it as early as 1st - 8th century AD.

Back about 2004 I began doing ancestral studies (still mostly incomplete) and looking for hidden ethnic ancestry of various types.

I came across Melungeon data on Ancestry.com blogs, from a wonderful lady named Nancy Sparks-Morrison. She personally reached out to me and invited me to join her online group, Melungeons. The group no longer exists, Nancy has passed on. If you google Melungeons you will find gatherings, sites etc. One main concept is, Turks and Sephardic Jews were rescued from the Inquisition and dumped on the shores of America in the 1500s. After the persecution they experienced, some converted to Christianity (Primitive Babtist church) (possibly) Quakers etc. and others were crypto (hidden) Jews for centuries.  For an example there was a "Babtist" church in the south for centuries. About 2002-2005 time period they came out and announced they had been secret, "crypto" Jews for centuries, afraid of persecution. They renamed it a Temple...Read about it years ago, will post more later...

Many descendants of these Melungeon people just call themselves Irish or dutch and are Christians and have no idea of their ancestry. Some have hidden Roma gypsy, free African, turkish and/or Sephardic Jewish roots as well as the usual Scotch-Irish, Dutch etc.

I learned so much and have the (just an opinion) that my grandfather Townsend had Appalachian Melungeon roots. He did have sort of Asian eyes and coarse wiry hair which stood straight up until he began slicking it back. NA and African. As is typical for people of Melungeon ancestry we were told we only have "Irish, English, Dutch and German" ancestry.
The Melungeon theory is controversial, probably not accepted by mainstream science...
I have not done the DNA testing...
Book: The Melungeons: The Resurrection of a Proud People  I have posted about this elsewhere... Melungeon theory is tied up with NA heritage, true or not... still being discussed.
...
Short video... Hebrew-like inscriptions dating from 1st to 8th century AD. This is separate from the more recent possible influx of Jewish and Middle Eastern (Turks) influence in NA genetics and culture...  - Yowbarb 

Cherokee DNA from History Channel.wmv

https://youtu.be/wHNRf9H7nD4

Uploaded on Dec 16, 2010
The History Channel's recent documentary, Who Really Discovered America? asks some profound questions. Chief Joe Sitting Owl of the Central Band of Cherokee explains Cherokee oral history and tradition that they are from Jewish ancestry. Light skinned, the Cherokee don't look like most Native Americans of Asian ancestry. The Bat Creek stone, archaeologically removed from a Hopewell burial mound by the Smithsonian, has inscribed in ancient Hebrew the phrase "For Judea" or "For the Judeans." Only 3% of Chief Sitting Owls tribe had Jewish DNA, but 94% of those tested in the Central Band showed European DNA that goes back thousands of years. It is not widely known that haplogroup X is one of the 12 primary Jewish lineages, and is found in the Cherokee.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2017, 03:59:04 PM
Well I hope that post wasn't too confusing...  May re-do it later... :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 04, 2017, 04:10:06 PM
Yowbarb Note: I decided to start a new topic called Melungeons.
There are some other posts about the subject scattered throughout the Town Hall.
Will try to get it all in the one topic.
...
SEE:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=6632.new#new  MELUNGEONS
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: R.R. Book on June 04, 2017, 05:22:27 PM
Hey Barb,

Lots to chew on there.  Since the Primitive Baptists out East here conserved a lot of the Appalachian hymns, I've spent a number of years getting to know them and their traditions, which have been passed down through the non-denominational public hymn-sings that they help to spread.  Interestingly, and quite unlike Southern Baptists, their written creed says that they are the Chosen People / Elect and do not encourage converts, other than to draw in young singers to preserve the music and then take it back to their own communities. 

Regarding Cherokee genealogy and ethnicity: The Lenape/Delaware people, except for a small remnant, were "persuaded" to relocate from the Eastern PA area to live among the Cherokee in Oklahoma, and it's said that their lineages are so intertwined now that they cannot be easily untangled.  The French settlers here during the pre-removal Colonial era treated Natives as equals and sought out brides from among them, producing some happy family unions if I understand correctly.  That might help to explain the fair skin phenotype.  Howard Zinn did, however, mention that American Indians and free blacks also inter-married frequently.

Looking forward to more of your research on this!

Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 05, 2017, 07:48:37 PM
Hey Barb,

Lots to chew on there.  Since the Primitive Baptists out East here conserved a lot of the Appalachian hymns, I've spent a number of years getting to know them and their traditions, which have been passed down through the non-denominational public hymn-sings that they help to spread.  Interestingly, and quite unlike Southern Baptists, their written creed says that they are the Chosen People / Elect and do not encourage converts, other than to draw in young singers to preserve the music and then take it back to their own communities. 

Regarding Cherokee genealogy and ethnicity: The Lenape/Delaware people, except for a small remnant, were "persuaded" to relocate from the Eastern PA area to live among the Cherokee in Oklahoma, and it's said that their lineages are so intertwined now that they cannot be easily untangled.  The French settlers here during the pre-removal Colonial era treated Natives as equals and sought out brides from among them, producing some happy family unions if I understand correctly.  That might help to explain the fair skin phenotype.  Howard Zinn did, however, mention that American Indians and free blacks also inter-married frequently.

Looking forward to more of your research on this!

R.R. that is so wonderful that you have met some of the Primitive Baptists
-  and - studied the Appalachian music.
I had heard that or seen it in movies, perhaps how the French trappers married Native American women...  Also, yes I read it on Melungeon sites how Appalachia was a real melting pot, Portuguese, some of whom Sephardic, marrying NA (and read some few Jewish tribes left) and intermarriage with some Roma, some Turks, Free African. I think I have all that ancestry but will probably never know... not total faith in DNA testing but will try.
BTW there is a lot of opposition online to anything to do with these Melungeon theories... Oh well. :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2017, 03:17:35 PM
https://nativenewsonline.net/    Native News Online

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Chairman Fraizer Reacts to U.S. District Court DAPL Decision

Published June 16, 2017 EAGLE BUTTE, SOUTH DAKOTA – On June 14, 2017, a federal judge ruled in favor

EAGLE BUTTE, SOUTH DAKOTA – On June 14, 2017, a federal judge ruled in favor of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

The 91-page opinion stated “did not adequately consider” Tribal interests when making decisions regarding the permitting of the DAPL.

The ruling on Wednesday confirmed CRST’s allegations regarding the process used by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACoE) to permit the pipeline. Although the federal judge stopped short of shutting down the pipeline citing the need for another hearing next week.

“I HAVE ALWAYS HAD FAITH AND BELIEVED IN THE PEOPLE, TREATIES AND WATER PROTECTORS. THE PRAYERS OF MANY WERE ANSWERED WITH THIS DECISION. IT IS ONE VICTORY IN THE MANY BATTLES THAT WILL FACE OUR PEOPLE, BUT HISTORY HAS SHOWN THE WE WILL ALWAYS PREVAIL WITH UNITY AND PRAYER,” STATED CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE CHAIRMAN HAROLD FRAZIER.

Nicole Ducheneaux, an attorney for the CRST, stated “This is a major victory for all of Indian country, not just the Cheyenne River and Standing Rock Sioux Tribes, because it affirms that the United States must honor its solemn treaty obligations when it makes decisions that affect our resources.  While the Tribe is pleased, we also understand that we have won the battle, not the war.  In addition to the question of whether the oil should continue flowing, the Tribe remains concerned that the court has misunderstood the United States’ and the Corps’ trust responsibility to us.  There is a lot of fight left to fight.  We are ready.”
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2017, 03:21:11 PM
Yowbarb Note: When it says, "The bill is cosponsored by the following representatives:" this means they are co sponsing the House Grijalva Bill which would REVERSE THE GIVEAWAY OF SACRED TRIBAL LANDS.  So the Representatives listed at the bottom of the article are supporting the  Tribe's position. Also, Senator Bernie Sanders, I, VT has introduced a companion Bill in the Senate today.
...
https://nativenewsonline.net/    Native News Online

https://nativenewsonline.net/currents/grijalva-bill-reverses-giveaway-sacred-tribal-land-foreign-owned-mining-company-sen-sanders-offering-senate-companion/

Grijalva Bill Reverses Giveaway of Sacred Tribal Land to Foreign-Owned Mining Company – Sen. Sanders Offering Senate Companion

BY NATIVE NEWS ONLINE STAFF / 16 JUN 2017

WASHINGTON – Ranking Member Raúl M. Grijalva today introduced the Save Oak Flat Act, which repeals an unjustified congressional giveaway of sacred Native American land to a mining company called Resolution Copper co-owned by multinational mining conglomerates Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is introducing a companion bill in the upper chamber today.

Section 3003 of the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act authorized the transfer of 2,422 acres in Arizona’s Tonto National Forest to Resolution Copper despite the area’s cultural importance to the San Carlos Apache and other local tribes in the region. The area, known as Oak Flat, has been home to tribal acorn gathering and traditional religious ceremonies for centuries. If Resolution Copper continues with its stated plans to establish a so-called block cave mine on the land, its environmental and cultural value will be destroyed.

Grijalva’s bill – a successor to his H.R. 2811 from the 114th Congress – would repeal section 3003, which has no connection to national defense. Grijalva has taken a leading lawmaker role in the ongoing Save Oak Flat movement and hosted a congressional forum on the issue in the last Congress.

“Using our military as an excuse to give sacred land away to a mining company is a cynical abuse of power,” Grijalva said today. “This is exactly the kind of Beltway corporate favoritism the American people can’t stand, and it needs to be undone immediately. Supporting this bill means standing up for tribal sovereignty and environmental quality. Opposing it means handing American resources over to a multinational conglomerate with no interest in our economy, let alone American Indian rights.”

“Too many times our Native American brothers and sisters have seen the profits of huge corporations put ahead of their sovereign rights,” Sen. Sanders said. “It is wrong that a backroom deal in Washington could lead to the destruction of a sacred area that is so important to so many. We must defend the hundreds of thousands of Americans who are standing in opposition to this giveaway of our natural resources to foreign corporations.”

Resolution’s proposed mine is directly adjacent to Apache Leap, a beautiful escarpment of unique archeological and historical significance, where Apaches pursued by the U.S. cavalry leapt to their deaths to avoid capture. Vernelda Grant, the tribal historic preservation officer for the San Carlos Apache Tribe, expressed concern in the respected journal Science in 2014 that, as the magazine put it, the mine is “right next door” to Apache Leap and “having a working copper mine next to the site will change how people experience it.”

Section 3003 is strongly opposed by Indian tribes across the country because of the dangerous precedent it has set. By requiring the conveyance of the land regardless of the outcome of mandated federal consultation with affected tribes, it allows Congress essentially to ignore the basic principles of federal-tribal relations. The language also requires the conveyance regardless of the outcome of a mandatory environmental review process, ignoring decades of environmental precedent requiring advance land and water impact analyses so that these analyses can help inform decision-makers about potential impacts from proposed activities before decisions are made that could have irreversible consequences.

The bill is cosponsored by the following representatives:

Grace F. Napolitano (D-Calif.)

Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.)

Mark Pocan (D-Wisc.)

Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.)

Tom Cole (R-Okla.)

Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.)

Walter B. Jones (R-N.C.)

Donald S. Beyer, Jr. (D-Va.)

Peter A. DeFazio (D-Oregon)

Diana DeGette (D-Colo.)

Jared Huffman (D-Calif.)

Ruben Gallego (D-Ariz.)

Norma J. Torres (D-Calif.)

Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.)

Niki Tsongas (D-Mass.)

Ted W. Lieu (D-Calif.)

Suzan K. DelBene (D-Wash.)

Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.)

Betty McCollum (D-Minn.)

Derek Kilmer (D-Wash.)

Alan Lowenthal (D-Calif.)

Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon)

Jared Polis (D-Colo.)

Raul Ruiz (D-Calif.)

Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md.)

Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.)

Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.)

Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-N.M.)

Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan (D-Mariana Islands)

Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on July 30, 2017, 10:07:37 PM
VIDEO:

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2017/05/10/kamau-bell-native-americans-united-shades-orig-wl.cnn

A hard look at the treatment of Native Americans
United Shades of America

W. Kamau Bell explores the causes behind poverty, unemployment and crime among the country's indigenous people. "United Shades of America" airs Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.Source: CNN
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: R.R. Book on August 02, 2017, 10:05:04 AM
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on August 02, 2017, 04:19:06 PM
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States
Amazing laws that had been passed, eh?  We recently watched a Netflix series on slavery in the U.S., and OMG was it an eye-opener, especially the part about the laws passed that criminalized teaching Blacks to read.  It is easy to see why Black Studies programs now exist, as mainstream education has always downplayed the genocidal and otherwise horrific treatment of any non-whites.  And still it lives.

Thanks for sharing the photo of your lovely great grandma.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 19, 2017, 02:19:29 PM
Barb, This struck a note, as I was recently combing through some old family portraits that had belonged to my mother, and came across a portrait of my quarter Cherokee great grandmother, who died before I was born, and was so struck by how European her appearance was.  According to the Dawes Act, 1/4 Blood Quantum or greater qualifies a person as being Native (and thus entitled to full tribal membership), so my Granny Fanny May would have been regarded as Native, except for one thing:

The predominantly white culture outside the Oklahoma reservation system had stripped every vestige of her paternal Native identity away from her, leaving a woman who would pass for pure Caucasian.  If unsure why that mattered back then, see "Anti-miscegenation laws" on Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-miscegenation_laws_in_the_United_States

Wow, RR how did I miss your wonderful post?  You can be so proud of your Native American heritage and your ancestor. I would love to know that, for sure. :) Here is my hs pic...In my thirties, some said I looked just slightly NA with cheekbones, texture of hair and etc. My hair is fairly straight but thick and a little coarse... skin is white, no record of NA heritage although Grandfather looked part.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 19, 2017, 02:23:09 PM
http://www.cherokee.org/Services/Tribal-Citizenship/Citizenship

Cherokee Nation citizenship law is set by tribal law. There is no minimum blood quantum required for citizenship. Tribal citizenship requires that you have at least one direct ancestor listed on the Dawes Final Rolls, a federal census of those living in the Cherokee Nation that was used to allot Cherokee land to individual citizens in preparation for Oklahoma statehood in 1907.

To be eligible for Cherokee Nation tribal citizenship, you must be able to provide documents that connect you to a direct ancestor listed on one of the Dawes Final Rolls of Citizens of the Cherokee Nation. To be eligible for a federal Certificate Degree of Indian Blood, you must demonstrate through documentation that you descend directly from a person listed on the Dawes’ “by Blood” rolls. This group of census rolls were taken between 1899-1906 of Citizens and Freedmen residing in Indian Territory (now northeastern Oklahoma).  If your ancestor did not live in this geographical area during that time period, they will not be listed on the Dawes Rolls.

More excerpts:
If you need help with your research, please contact the Family Research office at the Cherokee Heritage Center, 918-456-6007, or at the following link: http://www.cherokeeheritage.org.   NOTE: Genealogist assisted research is a fee-based service. The Heritage Center is not able to provide research assistance by phone because of high demand and time involved.

Also, you may visit the following website: http://guides.tulsalibrary.org/genealogy

You can access the DAWES ROLLS at:

www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.htm
 or www.okhistory.org/research/dawes (fee may be required)

       General Contact for the Cherokee Nation Registration Office
        registration@cherokee.org  918-458-6980 OR 1-800-256-0671
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: R.R. Book on October 19, 2017, 07:09:44 PM
Great resources Barb!  I'll pass them on to my cousins, too!

Also, I has missed the post of your portrait - you look like a certain movie star, but I can't decide which one...maybe Natalie Wood? :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on October 21, 2017, 09:18:54 AM
Great resources Barb!  I'll pass them on to my cousins, too!

Also, I has missed the post of your portrait - you look like a certain movie star, but I can't decide which one...maybe Natalie Wood? :)

Thanks! I never looked as good as her. :)
Natalie wood, I found out many years after her death came from a family of Russian-Jewish roots.
Possible her real surname was not Wood...
I do not know yet if I have Jewish roots, I think so...
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: ilinda on October 21, 2017, 05:43:10 PM
Great resources Barb!  I'll pass them on to my cousins, too!

Also, I has missed the post of your portrait - you look like a certain movie star, but I can't decide which one...maybe Natalie Wood? :)
Or, how about Ava Gardner?
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2017, 07:35:49 AM
Great resources Barb!  I'll pass them on to my cousins, too!

Also, I has missed the post of your portrait - you look like a certain movie star, but I can't decide which one...maybe Natalie Wood? :)
Or, how about Ava Gardner?

Gosh thanks! Never looked as good as her, either. :)
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2017, 07:39:06 AM
I'm sure many of you heard about the long protracted battle over the keystone pipeline on ancient ancestral land (which was taken away violating a treaty but long considered part "not Indian land." Also the pipeline IS next to officially Indian land...
Well here is an update on the Keystone Pipeline. BTW all the rhetoric about how this pipeline will provide jobs. Lies. Only 35-36 permanent jobs. screen shot at bottom is the Mayflower oil spill from 2013

http://www.cnn.com/2017/11/16/us/keystone-pipeline-leak/index.html

Keystone Pipeline leaks 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota
By Mayra Cuevas and Steve Almasy, CNN
Updated 2:06 PM ET, Fri November 17, 2017

https://www.prwatch.org/news/2014/02/12401/keystone-pipelies-exposed-sticky-oil-leaks-billion-dollar-spills-and-human-health
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2017, 08:03:43 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/keystone-pipeline-spill-sisseton-wahpeton-oyate-1.4406515

Native American tribe bracing for Keystone pipeline leak impact
South Dakota authorities concerned over delay in notification from TransCanada
By Jorge Barrera, CBC News Posted: Nov 16, 2017 9:14 PM ET Last Updated: Nov 16, 2017 9:14 PM ET
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2017, 08:13:16 AM
https://www.facebook.com/DigitalSmokeSignals/?hc_ref=ARTQJsg5VNg96a82-O_-TcxhNpotFYU-K6cI5IzGlVw0nZ84Ny5wNFfD1cSW4c_ElMo

Digital Smoke Signals live now
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on November 18, 2017, 08:37:34 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2017/11/16/us/keystone-pipeline-leak/index.html
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 10, 2018, 07:32:05 PM
http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/news/a56903/native-americans-keystone-pipeline/

People Shouldn't Buy the Right to Steal Your Land
Native Americans have seen this monster before.

Aug 9, 2017 - In Nebraska, the alliance between Native Americans and ranchers, particularly over issues of eminent domain, not only was shot through with remarkable historical je ... What Is the Keystone Pipeline Fight Really About? ... Prayer meeting among the tribes united against the Keystone XL pipeline pic.twitter.com/pkf2dviYSw.
Title: Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
Post by: Yowbarb on January 20, 2018, 10:54:45 AM
https://www.facebook.com/groups/705738549575584/permalink/988495181299918/