Ed Douglas & Richard Goodwin (ASEEKERTOO) > PLANET X ASTRONOMY

Info from NASA started by Ed

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Yowbarb:
Ed and All I know there has been some discussion on here about upcoming NASA announcements but I am not finding a Topic on this.
So here goes. [NASA News and Press Conferences Topic, begun in 2010, merged into Ed's Topic Info from NASA here.] You will see both subject titles.
Yowbarb Some of the announcements are still coming out. 
Numbering these I) and II)
One announcement today was that there will be a news conference on the 18th.
 Details farther below. The other announcement is about the nearest black hole ever discovered
- Yowbarb  08 July 2011 UPDATE: I just merged my NASA New Topic, begun in 2010, into Ed's more recent NASA Topic here.

http://www.nasa.gov/news/releases/latest/index.html

I) NASA Announces Comet Encounter News Conference11.15.10 - NASA will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. EST on Thursday, Nov. 18, to discuss new scientific findings from the recent EPOXI mission spacecraft encounter with comet Hartley 2. [Planetbarb's Note: See farther below, the news conference is the 18th.]
 
II) NASA'S Chandra Finds Youngest Nearby Black Hole 11.15.10
- Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have found evidence of the youngest black hole known to exist in our cosmic neighborhood.

Announcement I)
Nov. 15, 2010 MEDIA ADVISORY : M10-161  NASA Announces Comet Encounter News Conference  
WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. EST on Thursday, Nov. 18, to discuss new scientific findings from the recent EPOXI mission spacecraft encounter with comet Hartley 2. The news conference will originate from the NASA Headquarters auditorium at 300 E St. SW in Washington. It will be carried live on NASA Television.

Media representatives may attend the conference, ask questions by phone or from participating NASA locations. To RSVP or obtain dial-in information, journalists must send their name, affiliation and telephone number to Steve Cole at stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov or call 202-358-0918 by 11 a.m. EST on Nov. 18.

The news conference participants are:
-- Michael A'Hearn, EPOXI principal investigator, University of Maryland
-- Jessica Sunshine, EPOXI deputy principal investigator, University of Maryland
-- Tim Larson, EPOXI project manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
-- Pete Schultz, EPOXI scientist, Brown University

NASA's EPOXI spacecraft successfully flew past comet Hartley 2 on Nov. 4, providing scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history.

For NASA TV streaming video and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

For more information about NASA's EPOXI mission visit:  http://www.nasa.gov/epoxi

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..............................................................Trent Perrotto
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0321
trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov
 
Janet Anderson
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-6162
janet.l.anderson@nasa.gov
 
Megan Watzke
Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, Mass.
617-496-7998
mwatzke@cfa.harvard.edu   

Announcement II)
Nov. 15, 2010 RELEASE : 10-299  NASA'S Chandra Finds Youngest Nearby Black Hole   
WASHINGTON -- Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have found evidence of the youngest black hole known to exist in our cosmic neighborhood. The 30-year-old black hole provides a unique opportunity to watch this type of object develop from infancy.

The black hole could help scientists better understand how massive stars explode, which ones leave behind black holes or neutron stars, and the number of black holes in our galaxy and others.

The 30-year-old object is a remnant of SN 1979C, a supernova in the galaxy M100 approximately 50 million light years from Earth. Data from Chandra, NASA's Swift satellite, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady during observation from 1995 to 2007. This suggests the object is a black hole being fed either by material falling into it from the supernova or a binary companion.

"If our interpretation is correct, this is the nearest example where the birth of a black hole has been observed," said Daniel Patnaude of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. who led the study.

The scientists think SN 1979C, first discovered by an amateur astronomer in 1979, formed when a star about 20 times more massive than the sun collapsed. Many new black holes in the distant universe previously have been detected in the form of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs).

However, SN 1979C is different because it is much closer and belongs to a class of supernovas unlikely to be associated with a GRB. Theory predicts most black holes in the universe should form when the core of a star collapses and a GRB is not produced.

"This may be the first time the common way of making a black hole has been observed," said co-author Abraham Loeb, also of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "However, it is very difficult to detect this type of black hole birth because decades of X-ray observations are needed to make the case."

The idea of a black hole with an observed age of only about 30 years is consistent with recent theoretical work. In 2005, a theory was presented that the bright optical light of this supernova was powered by a jet from a black hole that was unable to penetrate the hydrogen envelope of the star to form a GRB. The results seen in the observations of SN 1979C fit this theory very well.

Although the evidence points to a newly formed black hole in SN 1979C, another intriguing possibility is that a young, rapidly spinning neutron star with a powerful wind of high energy particles could be responsible for the X-ray emission. This would make the object in SN 1979C the youngest and brightest example of such a "pulsar wind nebula" and the youngest known neutron star. The Crab pulsar, the best-known example of a bright pulsar wind nebula, is about 950 years old.

"It's very rewarding to see how the commitment of some of the most advanced telescopes in space, like Chandra, can help complete the story," said Jon Morse, head of the Astrophysics Division at NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

The results will appear in the New Astronomy journal in a paper by Patnaude, Loeb, and Christine Jones of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge.

For more information about Chandra, including images and other multimedia, visit:

http://chandra.nasa.gov and  http://chandra.harvard.edu   
 
- end -

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Ed Douglas:
Yep, the young black hole. I figured it would be something of unimportance to our cause.  NASA has a way of doing this.  ed

Yowbarb:

--- Quote from: Ed Douglas on November 16, 2010, 08:47:13 AM ---Yep, the young black hole. I figured it would be something of unimportance to our cause.  NASA has a way of doing this.  ed

--- End quote ---

Ed
the only thng is, on Monday NASA did announce upcoming Press Conference about what they found during their comet flyby mission. So that is Wednesday the 18th.
(The only reason I posted that is, who knows what they might announce on Wednesday. )
True it is probably nothing... but I will take a look at it when it happens.
I happened to see this about the Wed Press Conference late at night, and thought I would do a Topic
on it before I forgot.
All The Best,

Yowbarb

Yowbarb:
http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/02/18/nasa.shuttle/index.html

Discovery's final flight scheduled for Thursday
 
By the CNN Wire Staff  February 18, 2011 10:14 p.m. EST

(CNN) -- Weather and conditions permitting, space shuttle Discovery will lift off Thursday on its final flight, NASA announced Friday.
 
The six-member crew will deliver a storage module, a science rig and spare parts to the international space station during its 11-day mission.
 
Originally scheduled for November, Discovery's launch was delayed because of repairs to the external tank's support beams.
 
NASA, which is winding down the shuttle program, announced the February 24 launch a few weeks ago, but confirmed it after a meeting briefing Friday. This will be Discovery's 39th voyage.
 
The launch is scheduled for 4:50 p.m. at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
 
Astronaut Steve Bowen was assigned to take the place of Tim Kopra, who was injured in a bicycle accident, NASA said.
 
The last scheduled launch of space shuttle Endeavour is currently on for April 19 and shuttle Atlantis is tentatively scheduled to launch during the summer.


...

Yowbarb:
I just spent a half hour putting together the news releases but got had a problem posting it and it
was all lost. B back later or tomorrow.
Here is the main link to access NASA News Releases.
- Yowbarb

http://www.nasa.gov/news/index.html  NASA News Index

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