Author Topic: Low voltage lighting  (Read 5160 times)

billxam

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Low voltage lighting
« on: May 16, 2011, 05:16:42 PM »
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« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 06:32:54 PM by billxam »

Boonie Stomper

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2011, 07:15:21 PM »
Can you post or direct us to the plans you mention?   
there is nothing as pure as a mix of faith and pure imagination :D

Boonie Stomper

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2011, 07:17:10 PM »
Can you post or direct us to the plans you mention?

I'm going to do a detailed segment about them and will also do another set with a step by step instruction set. It's actually very easy to do. You're working with very low voltages that are self contained so there isn't any danger to the person other than using a soldering iron - and you don't even need to do that - I solder all of my connections. I'm a silver solder freak.

Will have the plans in about a week or so.

Rolling over for you... can you give a sneak peek / preview...  ??  Curiosity, you know...   :)
there is nothing as pure as a mix of faith and pure imagination :D

noproblemo2

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2011, 12:36:17 PM »
Here's the parts list for the project. I'll do it up this weekend.

1. Enercellâ„¢ Universal DC Power Adapter Model: 273-365 Catalog #: 273-365
This is the product that Radio Shack sells. Yeah, it's $25 but I've had mine for years so I know they're good. You can get any one you want but it must adapt 12 volts (step-down) to both 3 and 4.5 volts.

2.  Hampton Bay Outdoor Black Spot Solar Lights (3-Pack) Model # 79778 Store SKU # 555208
These are the current model as sold at Home Depot. The model that we have is slightly different - these things change like the wind. The brand that we have is made by Portfolio. What's important is that we're talking about 3 LED heads with 3 LED bulbs in each that require 3 AA rechargeable batteries.

3. Electrical tape, wire strippers (or a knife to strip off insulation), soldering iron (20 watts), rosin core solder (not acid core), 1 wood block (for mounting the light onto, drill bit same size as the post that comes with the lights.

I have a forstner drill bit set that I use to drill large holes but a paddle bit would work as well - the hole just wouldn't be as pretty.
Have been wanting to get these, now I WILL get them.

Frisky Robert

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2011, 10:34:16 AM »
I am now rewiring my small house with 12 volt wires for each room but, now I need to know what kind of lights to use. I thought about R/V lights but do they draw too much power? How do the LED lights fit in and which ones are best? I am planning to run direct from a deep cycle R/V battery that will be charged with a wind mill and a solar panel. I'm just getting started and do not have much experience at it. I live in a place that has steady winds and sun. Helpful advice anyone?   :)
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1969quartz0

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2011, 10:22:38 AM »
Frisky Robert the LED lamp I like the best uses 3.5 watts of power it is 12 volts DC and is frosted so there is very low glare but one lamp will light a room fairly well, it uses a standard Edison base (medium) like most homes in the U.S. use for lighting, and is about 4100 kelvin for its color range, that is the color of pig iron at that temperature or daylight white light not warm light. do a search for      MR PL DC DL     model MR-PL it has a 50,000 hour rating and made by Rohs. Robert I hope this helps just do not screw it into a 110 volt AC lamp socket or it is done for.

Frisky Robert

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2011, 11:56:58 AM »
Thank you!!!
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Do what we can

ilinda

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2017, 05:18:46 PM »
OK, here is a question for anyone who knows more than I about electricity, which is about anyone reading this.

I have a microscope whose only electrical connection is for the quartz halogen lamp inside.  From my recent studies of lighting for low voltage DC from solar, halogen lamps/bulbs can be used with either AC or DC, and it is only the voltage that is important.  For example, a 12 V halogen bulb, according to the source, can be used with 12 V AC or 12 V DC. 

Also, it is my understanding that DC bulbs can often tolerate a bit more variance in voltage than AC incandescent bulbs can.  What I'm leading to is this:  does anyone think it might be possible to plug my microscope light in to DC, rather than AC, as long as the voltage is within an acceptable range?  (I'll research the bulb it uses very carefully).

The main reason is that I'm come to the conclusion that many inverters are junk or are so tempermental that they are close to useless, as we now find our inverter works only if it it constantly "reset", which means power down, power back up while holding down the reset button, etc., etc., blah, blah.  Am thinking of ditching the AC portion of system.

Does anyone have clues about this microscope bulb and the possibility of going DC?  I suppose a mistake on my part may blow a fuse, so better be careful.

ilinda

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Re: Low voltage lighting
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2017, 05:06:12 PM »
Update on my earlier question about microscope.  I looked at the schematics and realize there's a transformer inside the scope.  So, does anyone know if I can figure out how to remove the transformer from the wiring, leaving everything else, including quartz halogen bulb apparatus, so that I could possibly run this microscope on DC? 

The ONLY use for electricity in this older microscope is the lighting.  There are no electronics or computer chips, boards, etc., inside, and the microscope stage purely moved mechanically, and the halogen bulb is the only thing needing electricity.  I'd like to figure out how to remove the transformer and leave all else the same.  Does anyone know if this can be done w/o destroying the entire wiring?