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Keeping your pets and domestic animals safe during cataclysms

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inselemel:
I got this in a Tweet from the American Humane Society in relation to the possibility of Evacuation in Montana and although a lot is common sense there might be stuff of interest for people everywhere in the world in case of evacuation!

http://www.humanesociety.org/news/press_releases/2012/06/montana_residents_pet_evacuation_062812.html?utm_source=twpost062812&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=summer12

Montana Residents Urged to Take Pets with Them If Evacuating
The Humane Society of the United States reminds residents across Montana who may be in the path of multiple devastating wildfires to take their pets with them if they evacuate. Fires across the state have already burned hundreds of thousands of acres and displaced hundreds of families. There could be additional evacuations as the wildfires continue to burn.

“It is crucial that residents are prepared to take pets with them when evacuating in the face of these destructive fires,” advised Wendy Hergenraeder, Montana state director for The HSUS. “If it isn't safe for you, it isn't safe for your pets. This is especially important to remember as we gear up for an already destructive wildfire season.”

Pet owners should have an emergency plan that includes the safety of their animals, and always be informed about the potential for evacuation in their area.

This emergency supply kit should include:

Three-or-more-day supply of food in airtight, waterproof container, and drinking water.
 Bowls for food and water.
 Current photos and physical description of your pets, including details on markings.
 Medications, vaccination records and pet first aid supplies.
 Comfort items such as a toy and blanket.
 Small garbage bags.
 For dogs include: leash, harness and a sturdy carrier large enough to use as a sleeping area.
 For cats include: litter and litter box and a sturdy carrier large enough for transport.
Pet owners should be aware that many evacuation shelters do not accept pets, and they must plan their destination in advance. Hotels and motels may be willing to lift "no pet" restriction in an emergency. Friends and family members living outside the area may be able to provide shelter too. Please check with your local animal shelter or emergency management office to determine if a pet friendly emergency shelter will be set up in your location.

More than 358 million pets reside in 63 percent of American households. A Zogby International poll found that 61 percent of pet owners will not evacuate if they cannot bring their pets with them.

For more tips on preparedness plans that include your pets, visit humanesociety.org/prepare.

Media Contact: Stephanie Twining, 240-751-3943, stwining@humanesociety.org"

Yowbarb:
Mel thanks very much for your post and all this info. This is a stark reminder that if people end up getting suddenly evacuated it will probably be a quick goodbye to their beloved pets...If there's even time for that.  :'(
- Yowbarb

inselemel:
I am sure everyone on this board is well prepped for any kind of disaster and have made plans including their pets are safe and not just left to die. I know its all common sense but just thought i would post it anyway.

Yowbarb:

--- Quote from: inselemel on June 29, 2012, 01:15:58 AM ---I am sure everyone on this board is well prepped for any kind of disaster and have made plans including their pets are safe and not just left to die. I know its all common sense but just thought i would post it anyway.

--- End quote ---

I appreciate you sharing your ideas here. I personally do not have my plan all together.
We do have several large heavy plastic cat carriers...

Yowbarb:
Just some books and ideas to share,
Yowbarb
...

http://www.informedguides.com/from-the-field/helping-pets-during-disasters/

Pet Emergency Pocket Guide, 2nd edition

http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9781890495466/

“Pet emergencies are becoming a big issue with disaster assistance and it is falling to the community groups to deal with it. The Pet Emergency Pocket Guide has lots of good info to help: it includes a lot of information on disaster planning, evacuation and first-aid tips for pets. There are lots of drawings, forms for logging data and a simple tab system for finding data.”
 
Marcel Rodriguez, Team Lead
 Portland Emergency Management Teams
 Portland, Oregon

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