Author Topic: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.  (Read 898 times)

steedy

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Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« on: February 26, 2012, 04:44:35 PM »
Do you need to register an archery set, like you do a gun?  Do you need to take lessons?  I've been thinking of getting a bow, but not those fancy ones for archery competitions, just a basic one.

JKB

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2012, 05:22:08 PM »
No. You do not have to register a bow with the authorities.  I seriously recommend looking into a crossbow.  I have a crossbow and the whole reason I bought it was that I'm not a skilled bowhunter and I'm certainly not Rambo.  I figured I don't have time to learn all of that and I have a lot of friends that bowhunt.  A crossbow is easy.  If you can shoot a gun then you can fire a crossbow.  I've taken mine out several times and  I absolutely love it, I actually did a Robinhood and split one of my own arrows with it.  My favorite weapon, actually....  Quiet.  The whole reason I bought it...  hunt in silence.  If you decide to buy one let me or one of the other knowledgeable hunters in here know and we can point you in the right direction.  With things like this you get what you pay for.  Any crossbow is better than no crossbow.   But, if you are willing to put a little money into it I know some pretty good values that are out there.  Peace.  JKB
« Last Edit: February 26, 2012, 05:23:55 PM by JKB »
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

throwback1952

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2012, 05:26:44 PM »
I would like to know what a good value cross bow is, can you provide a link? ;D
I bought a PSE Stinger compound bow. I like it but find it cumbersome and difficult to shoot. It was my first bow and still learning it takes a lot of skill and practice to be good with it.
For survival and defense a crossbow would have been a better choice.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2012, 05:33:56 PM by throwback1952 »
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer.

JKB

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2012, 06:11:33 PM »
I guess they did away with the Ten Point Titan, which I thought was a pretty good value at $599.00.  I saved money for quite awhile in order to actually buy it.  However, this is the other crossbow I was thinking about at the time.... 
http://www.basspro.com/Barnett-Ghost-350-Crossbow-Package/product/10212308/91086
Same price range.  When I say you get what you pay for, I mean it.  I can't afford a $1200.00 crossbow but I can't imagine what a $1200.00 crossbow could do.  I do know this, a friend of mine just bought a $179.00 crossbow and mine runs circles around it.  That is the difference between a $179.00 crossbow and a $599.00 crossbow.  You get what you pay for, unfortunately.  Does that help at all???  Peace, JKB
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

sineck

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2012, 06:24:23 PM »
this post is a little bit crazy because it hits a few points but here goes, if your not accustomed to a traditional bow this will be a bit difficult, not in the way you may understand though, age has alot to do with it. i started with a bow at the age of eleven, i have even made my own, it does take time to understand, to get used to it. to be able to hit your target. and thats at thirty feet if your lucky. not all of us are olympic athletes.

     Over the centuries, bows and arrows have evolved with civilization. Not only is there a wide number of ancient and old types of bows and arrows, but with technological advances there are now more types than ever.

     Bows were of two basic kinds: wooden and composite. The earliest bows were undoubtedly made from wood, probably simply cut from saplings and whittled into the desired shape and strung with animal gut. These earliest of bows developed into the short bow, longbow, and various other plain bows.

     The Egyptians of the Nile region produced what is most likely the first extent bow, which had the basic design properties of the long bow.

     The Egyptians also used composite bows made up of wood and horn, with bows ranging shorter than a man’s height estimated at 150-200 lb. in draw weight. The Israelites made similar bows, with wood, reed, and water buffalo horn.

     The bow of Britain most likely started as the simple plain bow, or self bow, then through necessity and trial and error they developed the long bow, which was principally wood, if only with a strip of leather as a grip. The longbow was often taller than the archer, with a tremendous range. Also there developed bows of various lengths and uses.

     Native Americans made use of both wooden and composite bows depending on what was needed where. In the open plains strong bows of great range were used, and in the woodlands where stealth and cunning was needed, lighter bows
were used.

     Composite bows were made of either part wood and other material, or entirely out of other materials. In areas where wood of suitable kind and sufficient quantities were not to be had, composite bows developed.

     The Turkish composite, also called a short bow, was most likely the predecessor of the Asian composite bow. It had a wood core, which was layered with sinews on the back and horn on the belly.

     The Chinese composite bow differed from the Turkish composite in that it was made entirely out of vegetation. The back would be made from a strip of fresh bamboo that was cut after the end of the growing season (in place of elastic sinew) and the belly would be made from dried, year-old bamboo (in place of the compression-resistant horn). Vegetable glue was applied, and the whole thing was would in plant fibers and lacquered5.

     The crossbow was perhaps not as widely used as the bow, but nonetheless was a formidable weapon. It was a medieval weapon, usually used alongside bows. A crossbow is a bow mounted horizontally with a trigger. In place of arrows, bolts are used. Archery does not usually include crossbows.5

     Here are some bows that are used by archers of today; for competition, hunting, and recreation.8

Recurve bow= Often made of more than one material, either laminated carbon or fiberglass, with the tips curving away from the archer -- a very good bow for beginners, it is also the exclusive bow of the Olympics

Reflex bow = Sometimes confused with the recurve, the reflex bow curves completely away from the archer when unstrung

Self bow = Made from one material, usually wood, fairly straight

Straight bow= Nearly completely straight, made of laminated fiberglass or carbon

Longbow = Very similar to it’s medieval ancestors, made only of wood with of course a hand grip and/or sight, not considered used by many serious archers

Composite bow = Bow made of more than one material; usually a wooden core, molded fiberglass or carbon, then laminated

Compound = Not unlike the recurve, except for pulleys that aid in efficiency and adjustable limbs

Recommended Draw Weights

Beginners Draw Weight= 35-40 lb.

More Advanced Weight= 45+ lb.

Target/field for tournament shooting = 35-45 lb.

Hunters = 45-55 lb.
Selection of Bow Length

Draw Length   Bow Length
Below 24 Inches   60-64 Inches
25-26 Inches   65-66 Inches
27-28 Inches   67-68 Inches
29 Inches or More   69-70 Inches
     In choosing a new bow, a seasoned archer will try out several different types of bow, all of the same weight, but maybe of different models and/or weights. All will be tried out at different distances, and at the places that the archer most frequently shoots, be it shooting lanes, the open field, or the club range. Experienced archers can better judge the differences between different bows than a beginner, so the beginning archer should seek the guidance of a more experienced archer.     

     If you must be frugal, be cheap on the bow but get better arrows. Make sure they are straight, matched to the bow and each other.

     Wood arrows tend to warp and break easily, so proper care is essential. Some wood arrows are made from compressed cedar, which are stronger and resist warping. Although heavier and slower than non compressed wood, they provide better penetration. These are best for beginners, since beginners will tend to loose many arrows. They are not that expensive.

     More durable than wooden arrows are fiberglass arrows. Another pro to fiberglass arrows is that they can be fitted to each archer of varying lengths and strengths. In addition, fiberglass arrows of any given size are manufactured more consistently than wooden arrows. The down side is that they break easily.

     Aluminum arrows are types of arrows that can be manufactured more consistently than both wooden and fiberglass arrows. Therefore, archers purchase additional arrows that match up with their original. Furthermore, these arrows are manufactured in a wide variety of sizes and in different types of aluminum alloys. That makes them accessible to most everyone. Since these arrows can be straightened easily and the tips replaced, you can keep a good set of these arrows for a long time. Unfortunately, these arrows are rather expensive but their strength and consistency make them the number one choice among many advanced archers.

     Finally, the aluminum-carbon arrows. These types of arrows are made of an aluminum core with a carbon coat. These types of arrows are smaller and lighter than pure aluminum arrows, making them fly faster. The price of these arrows, however, is a major drawback. They are typically used by archers who shoot long distances outdoors. If you intend to pack your arrows in one spot on the target, then these are not the arrows to buy. If aluminum-carbon arrows are struck then the wrapping may break down. 

     As the archer increases in strength, his or her draw length will increase and they need to buy longer arrows.

     Fletching of the arrows is also important. Make sure the feathers are straight and stiff and properly cemented on. Most target arrows have fletching that is about 3 to 4 inches long. Bow hunting arrow fletching is about 5 inches in length to support the heavier arrow head.

     Arrow points' weight is measured in grains. Target shooters use light points, considerably less than 100 grains, while, bow hunters use heavier points, about 90 to 170 grains. Sometimes, bow hunters like to use field heads and broad heads from season to season.
library.thinkquest.org
hope this helps, but just asking, how many arrows can you really carry?, you should be able to make them while your afoot
and for all you begginers, get a compound. TRUST ME
Life is the element of disoriented illusions. A character of self- being with a mind of self awareness. Grievance combined with happiness in a fortitude of harmony and socio communicative disagreements of proffered existence. SINECK,

throwback1952

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2012, 06:50:04 PM »
That helps thank you. Look like they pack the same punch 350 ftlbs.
The arrows/bolts for the crossbow appear to cost a lot more than arrows.
I need to shoot one looks like it would be a lot simpler to handle.
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer.

family times41607

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2012, 08:05:19 PM »
  Throwback
  I have both a compound bow and a crossbow.  Crossbow is very easy to fire, silent, and deadly up to 35 yrds.  Compound bow has 40 yrd range, and you can get off about two shots per 10 seconds.  Crossbow you can get off about 3 shots per minute.  I know that speed is not the pluses of the bows.  Silence is.  For me the the compound is the way to go if you need to make more than one shot.  Crossbow is the way to go if you need to make one deadly shot.  Sometimes speed has to sacrificed, in order to make the kill.  Bottom line is you have to become proficient with both.  Then see which one you want to use.

steedy

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Re: Bows and arrows, crossbows, etc.
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2014, 06:08:38 PM »
How heavy are crossbows?  They seem bulky.

 

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