Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 42938 times)

Yowbarb

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Healing plants, herbs and foods
« on: April 08, 2010, 08:20:57 PM »
from Answers.com
http://www.answers.com/topic/shiitake-mushroom-1
Shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) is a fungus native to Japan, China, and Korea. Although these mushrooms are cultivated worldwide as of 2004, Japan is still the largest producer of shiitake mushrooms, producing 80% of the total supply. Used in Asian cuisine for over 2,000 years, cultivation of shiitake began almost 700 years ago in Japan. The Japanese consider the shiitake not only a flavorful food but also "the elixir of life." During the Ming Dynasty (1368
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 12:13:02 AM by Yowbarb »

Linda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2010, 04:21:13 PM »
Iodine rich sea vegetables. Most people are iodine deficient due to depleted soils, sea vegetables can help.

Neptune's Garden - Vegetables of the Sea


Most folks don't think of turning to the Earth's oceans for vegetables, yet there is a vast source of nutritious food available there that is just now reaching the mainstream diet in the United States - sea vegetables. Sea vegetables, or seaweed are marine algae which are abundant all over the world. You know, those big long things you see washed up on the coast that look like rubber and make great jumpropes when they're still moist. They, and the many other varieties, are among the most ancient life forms on earth and probably were the first life to exist. In many parts of the world, they have been harvested and eaten since long before land-based agriculture. They can be eaten fresh, but most often are granulated or dried and reconstituted while cooking other foods. They add a delicious variation to almost any dish, from rice to stir-fry to soup to popcorn.

Health Benefits of Seaweed
Sea vegetables are virtually fat-free, low calorie and one of the richest sources of minerals in the vegetable kingdom as they have ready access to the abundance of minerals found in the ocean. Nourishment is acquired across the sea vegeable's entire surface through the gentle wave action of underwater currents. Sea water & human blood contain many of the same minerals in very similar concentrations.
Sea vegetables contain high amounts of calcium and phosphorous and are extremely high in magnesium, iron, iodine and sodium. For example, 1/4 cup of cooked hijiki contains over half the calcium found in a cup of milk and more iron than in an egg, important concerns for vegans, those who refrain from eating any animal-based products. They also contain vitamins A, B1, C and E, as well as protein and carbohydrates.

One of seaweed's most prominent health benefits is its ability to remove radioactive strontium and other heavy metals from our bodies. Whole brown seaweeds (not granulated) such as kelp contain alginic acid which binds with the toxins in the intestines rendering them indigestible and carries them out of the system.


Types of Seaweed
Brown Algae
Arame - A Japanese sea vegetable, with a mild flavor, arame is dried and cut into thin strands, it can be added to soups or served as a vegetable side dish.

Hijiki - Found primarily in the Far East, contains the most calcium of any of the sea vegetables, 1400mg/100gr dry weight (compared to milk with 100mg/100gr.) In its natural state it is very tough; after harvesting it is dried, steamed and dried some more. When cooked, it rehydrates and expands about five times its dry volume.

Kelp - This sea vegetable grows mainly in the north along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. The name kelp is European in origin and originally referred to the ash derived from burning brown algae, which was used to produce soap and glass. Most often dried and sold whole, granulated or powdered. It can be sprinkled on foods as a condiment, or whole kelp adds a nice touch to salads or it can be used as a wrap for a variety of fillings.

Kombu - Kombu can be used for soup stock or added to the bottom of a pot of rice or vegetables to help them keep from sticking; added to a pot of beans, kombu helps them cook faster and renders them more digestible due to the high mineral content.

Wakame & Alaria - These seaweeds are similar in characteristics but differ in their habitats. Wakame is collected in the cold waters off the island of Hokaido, Japan and alaria is harvested in North America. Wakame is a good source of protein, iron, calcium, sodium & other minerals and vitamins. Alaria is high in vitamin K and the B-vitamins as well as the minerals iodine and bromine.

Red Algae
Agar-Agar - This is a versatile, tasty gel that will set at room temperature. Its been used for centuries in the home as a mild laxative and as a basic ingredient in a Japanese dessert, kanten. Agar-agar is rich in iodine and trace elements.

Irish Moss - Irish Moss is most often used dried in relishes, breads, soups or fritters. Many people snack on this dried dulse straight out of the bag.

Nori - Unlike other sea vegetables that are collected wild, Japanese nori is cultivated. In Ireland, it is known as sloke and in Scotland and Wales as laver. Gaelic people have long made flat breads from flour and nori, known as laver bread. Its most prominent use is as the wrapping for sushi, although it can be cut into strips, lightly toasted and used as a garnish as well. It is exceptionally high in vitamin A and protein.


http://www.efn.org/~sundance/Seaweed.html
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2010, 11:19:33 AM »
Linda thanks, these sea vegetables and also fresh water dulse are so valuable to people's health.
Good items to stock up on. The dried Nori might keep for awhile if packaged well.
Most of my kids liked the Nori. I would let them have squares of it, thin sheets and they would chew on them.
I think it was you?  posted about some macrobiotic goodies -anyway they would get a few "yinnies" macrobiotic chewable candy or a maple honey bear treat (from health food store) once twice  a mo. Blender drinks had a bit of honey, carob or maple or malt syrup. I was pretty good about no regular refined sugar for a long time,,, need to get back to that. Kids were no sickly... one did have some seasonal allergies but mainly fine.

Linda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2010, 12:57:02 PM »
You know Barb you can get dulse flakes to put on food, I don't know how long they can be kept for. I'll have to check on that. Also how long you can keep the nori sheets, they are dehydrated so maybe they have a long shelf life if kept totally dry.

My girlfriend eats those nori sheets all the time, she likes the salty taste. I do like sushi, and actually plan on having that tomorrow for lunch with my son. We are going shopping at the local green houses to get plants for our gardens so we always have lunch together. The Mom and son time!

Linda
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2010, 11:40:26 PM »
You know Barb you can get dulse flakes to put on food, I don't know how long they can be kept for. I'll have to check on that. Also how long you can keep the nori sheets, they are dehydrated so maybe they have a long shelf life if kept totally dry.

My girlfriend eats those nori sheets all the time, she likes the salty taste. I do like sushi, and actually plan on having that tomorrow for lunch with my son. We are going shopping at the local green houses to get plants for our gardens so we always have lunch together. The Mom and son time!

Linda

Dulse flakes sound good. Used to give my kids Dr. Bronners corn chips made with kelp.
Nori a few times a week. A spoonful of half kelp half honey was a remedy we had too.
Once I lived in Koreatown and they had this wonderful seasoned nori. Some were tamari flavored some had some sweet hot pepper but easy to eat. Just great. My son's friend and wife and little boy stayed with us. I brought home some flavored nori. Asked his mom if he could have some she and I didn''t know if he would like it. He gobbled it down and asked me for it a lot. I brought some every time I went by the market. Money was tight so we didn;t stock up on anything but we picked up a lot of staples at the korean store. Some of it very economical.

Linda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2010, 04:06:24 AM »
Little kids are so funny, it makes you wonder if they are actually craving something they need in their body.

Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2010, 06:35:29 AM »
Little kids are so funny, it makes you wonder if they are actually craving something they need in their body.

It may have been a mineral deficiency of the little boy. I suppose it's better to chew on nori than on the edge of the window sill or the pencils etc.  ;) He was doing pretty good staying there with me - When I was a kid I was always chewing on stuff sort of drove Mom nuts. Signs of mineral deficiencies in fingernails etc. Anyway when I found stuff like seaweed and algae I knew this was something needed...

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2010, 10:48:07 AM »
I just found a tidbit of info  - never knew about this.
From Wikipedia,
"There is also evidence that common foods may have some protective ability against sunburn if taken for a period before the exposure.[27] Beta-carotene and lycopene, chemicals found in tomatoes and other fruit, have been found to increase the skin's ability to resist the effects of UV light. In a 2007 study:
After about 10

1969quartz0

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2010, 09:56:22 AM »
 I hope this info. helps



 Apples
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Blocks diarrhea
 Improves lung capacity
 Cushions joints
 
Apricots
 Combats cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 Saves your eyesight
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 Slows aging process
 
Artichokes
 Aids digestion
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Guards against liver disease
 
Avocados
 Battles diabetes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 
Bananas
 Protects your heart
 Quiets a cough
 Strengthens bones
 Controls blood pressure
 Blocks diarrhea
 
Beans
 Prevents constipation
 Helps hemorrhoids
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 
Beets
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Protects your heart
 Aids weight loss
 
Blueberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Stabilizes blood sugar
 Boosts memory
 Prevents constipation
 
Broccoli
 Strengthens bones
 Saves eyesight
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 
Cabbage
 Combats cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Cantaloupe
 Saves eyesight
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Carrots
 Saves eyesight
 Protects your heart
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Promotes weight loss
 
Cauliflower
 Protects against Prostate Cancer
 Combats Breast Cancer
 Strengthens bones
 Banishes bruises
 Guards against heart disease
 
Cherries
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Ends insomnia
 Slows aging process
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Chestnuts
 Promotes weight loss
 Protects your heart
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Chili peppers
 Aids digestion
 Soothes sore throat
 Clears sinuses
 Combats Cancer
 Boosts immune system
 
Figs
 Promotes weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats Cancer
 Controls blood pressure
 
Fish
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Protects your heart
 Combats Cancer
 Supports immune system
 
Flax
 Aids digestion
 Battles diabetes
 Protects your heart
 Improves mental health
 Boosts immune system
 
Garlic
 Lowers cholesterol
 Controls blood pressure
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Fights fungus
 
Grapefruit
 Protects against heart attacks
 Promotes Weight loss
 Helps stops strokes
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 
Grapes
 Saves eyesight
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Enhances blood flow
 Protects your heart
 
Green tea
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Helps stops strokes
 Promotes Weight loss
 Kills bacteria
 
Honey
 Heals wounds
 Aids digestion
 Guards against ulcers
 Increases energy
 Fights allergies
 
Lemons
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Limes
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Controls blood pressure
 Smoothes skin
 Stops scurvy
 
Mangoes
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Regulates thyroid
 Aids digestion
 Shields against Alzheimer's
 
Mushrooms
 Controls blood pressure
 Lowers cholesterol
 Kills bacteria
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
Oats
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Prevents constipation
 Smoothes skin
 
Olive oil
 Protects your heart
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Battles diabetes
 Smoothes skin
 
Onions
 Reduce risk of heart attack
 Combats cancer
 Kills bacteria
 Lowers cholesterol
 Fights fungus
 
Oranges
 Supports immune systems
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Straightens respiration
 
 
 
Peaches
 Prevents constipation
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 Aids digestion
 Helps haemorrhoids
 
Peanuts
 Protects against heart disease
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats Prostate Cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Aggravates
Diverticulitis
 
Pineapple
 Strengthens bones
 Relieves colds
 Aids digestion
 Dissolves warts
 Blocks diarrhoea
 
Prunes
 Slows aging process
 Prevents constipation
 Boosts memory
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects against heart disease
 
Rice
 Protects your heart
 Battles diabetes
 Conquers kidney stones
 Combats cancer
 Helps stops strokes
 
Strawberries
 Combats cancer
 Protects your heart
 Boosts memory
 Calms stress
 
 
 
Sweet potatoes
 Saves your eyesight
 Lifts mood
 Combats cancer
 Strengthens bones
 
 
 
Tomatoes
 Protects prostate
 Combats cancer
 Lowers cholesterol
 Protects your heart
 
 
 
Walnuts
 Lowers cholesterol
 Combats cancer
 Boosts memory
 Lifts mood
 Protects against heart disease
 
Water
 Promotes Weight loss
 Combats cancer
 Conquers kidney stones
 Smoothes skin
 
 
 
Watermelon
 Protects prostate
 Promotes Weight loss
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Controls blood pressure
 
Wheat germ
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Wheat bran
 Combats Colon Cancer
 Prevents constipation
 Lowers cholesterol
 Helps stops strokes
 Improves digestion
 
Yogurt
 Guards against ulcers
 Strengthens bones
 Lowers cholesterol
 Supports immune systems
 Aids digestion
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2010, 06:40:22 AM »
Nathan, wow what a great list!
Thanks   8)
- Yowbarb

Linda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2010, 12:44:08 PM »
That is a great handy list to have, thanks Nathan.

Linda
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2010, 06:56:45 AM »
Pineapple apparently has so many health benefits it might be worthwhile to have a green house
full of them, somewhere on the bugout property. It would be tricky to protect them and keep them going but maybe there's a way.
Here's an article I found  on the World's Healthiest Foods site. Someone close to me had recommended
a pineapple cleanse at least a few times per month.
Here it is:  http://whfoods.org/  World's Healthiest Foods site
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34

Pineapple  
Pineapples have exceptional juiciness and a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. They are second only to bananas as America's favorite tropical fruit. Although the season for pineapple runs from March through June, they are available year-round in local markets.
.....................................
 
Health Benefits............................. http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#healthbenefits
Description.....................................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#descr
History............................... ...........http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#historyuse
How to Select and Store............... http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#purchasequalities
How to Enjoy.................................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#howtouse
Individual Concerns........................http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34#safetyissues
In Depth Nutritional Profile...http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrientprofile&dbid=27.
References
Health Benefits

Potential Anti-Inflammatory and Digestive Benefits

Bromelain is a complex mixture of substances that can be extracted from the stem and core fruit of the pineapple. Among dozens of components known to exist in this crude extract, the best studied components are a group of protein-digesting enzymes (called cysteine proteinases). Originally, researchers believed that these enzymes provided the key health benefits found in bromelain, a popular dietary supplement containing these pineapple extracts. In addition, researchers believed that these benefits were primarily limited to help with digestion in the intestinal tract. However, further studies have shown that bromelain has a wide variety of health benefits, and that many of these benefits may not be related to the different enzymes found in this extract. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by therapeutic doses of bromelain when taken as a dietary supplement. Studies are not available, however, to show these same potential benefits in relationship to normal intake of pineapple within a normal meal plan.

Bromelain extracts can be obtained from both the fruit core and stems of pineapple. Potentially important chemical differences appear to exist between extracts obtained from the stem versus the core fruit. However, the practical relevance of these differences is not presently understood. Most of the laboratory research on bromelain has been conducted using stem-based extracts, however.

Although healthcare practitioners have reported improved digestion in their patients with an increase in pineapple as their "fruit of choice" within a meal plan, we haven't seen published studies that document specific changes in digestion following consumption of the fruit (versus supplementation with the purified extract. However, we suspect that the core fruit will eventually turn out to show some unique health-supportive properties, including possible digestion-related and anti-inflammatory benefits.

Antioxidant Protection and Immune Support

Vitamin C is the body's primary water-soluble antioxidant, defending all aqueous areas of the body against free radicals that attack and damage normal cells. Free radicals have been shown to promote the artery plaque build-up of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease, cause the airway spasm that leads to asthma attacks, damage the cells of the colon so they become colon cancer cells, and contribute to the joint pain and disability seen in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain why diets rich in vitamin C have been shown to be useful for preventing or reducing the severity of all of these conditions. In addition, vitamin C is vital for the proper function of the immune system, making it a nutrient to turn to for the prevention of recurrent ear infections, colds, and flu.

Manganese and Thiamin (Vitamin B1) for Energy Production and Antioxidant Defenses

Pineapple is an excellent source the trace mineral manganese, which is an essential cofactor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. For example, the key oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase, which disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells), requires manganese. Just one cup of fresh pineapple supplies 128.0% of the DV for this very important trace mineral. In addition to manganese, pineapple is a good source of thiamin, a B vitamin that acts as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions central to energy production.

Protection against Macular Degeneration

Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.

In this study, which involved over 110,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants' consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease. Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but pineapple can help you reach this goal. Add fresh pineapple to your morning smoothie, lunch time yogurt, any fruit and most vegetable salads. For example, try adding chunks of pineapple to your next coleslaw or carrot salad.

Description

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, from which one of its most important health-promoting compounds, the enzyme bromelain, was named. The Spanish name for pineapple, pina, and the root of its English name, reflects the fruit's visual similarity to the pinecone.

Pineapples are actually not just one fruit but a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an "eye," the rough spiny marking on the pineapple's surface.

Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves. The fibrous flesh of pineapple is yellow in color and has a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

History

Although thought to have originated in South America, pineapples were first discovered by Europeans in 1493 on the Caribbean island that came to be known as Guadalupe. When Columbus and other discovers brought pineapples back to Europe, attempts were made to cultivate the sweet, prized fruit until it was realized that the fruit's need for a tropical climate inhibited its ability to flourish in this region. By the end of the 16th century, Portuguese and Spanish explorers introduced pineapples into many of their Asian, African and South Pacific colonies, countries in which the pineapple is still being grown today.

Since pineapples are very perishable, and modes of transportation to bring them stateside from the Caribbean Islands were relatively slow centuries ago, fresh pineapples were a rarity that became coveted by the early American colonists. While glazed, sugar-coated pineapples were a luxurious treat, it was the fresh pineapple itself that became the sought after true symbol of prestige and social class. In fact, the pineapple, because of its rarity and expense, was such a status item in those times that all a party hostess had to do was to display the fruit as part of a decorative centerpiece, and she would be awarded more than just a modicum of social awe and recognition.

In the 18th century, pineapples began to be cultivated in Hawaii, the only state in the U.S. in which they are still grown. In addition to Hawaii, other countries that commercially grow pineapples include Thailand, the Philippines, China, Brazil and Mexico.

How to Select and Store

Look for pineapples that are heavy for their size. While larger pineapples will have a greater proportion of edible flesh, there is usually no difference in quality between a small and large size pineapple. Pineapples should be free of soft spots, bruises and darkened "eyes," all of which may indicate that the pineapple is past its prime. Pineapple stops ripening as soon as it is picked, so choose fruit with a fragrant sweet smell at the stem end. Avoid pineapple that smells musty, sour or fermented.

For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened pineapple:

Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as fruits fully ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, their antioxidant levels actually increase.

Key to the process is the change in color that occurs as fruits ripen, a similar process to that seen in the fall when leaves turn from green to red to yellow to brown- a color change caused by the breakdown and disappearance of chlorophyll, which gives leaves and fruits their green color.

Until now, no one really knew what happened to chlorophyll during this process, but lead researcher, Bernard Kr
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 04:41:25 AM by Yowbarb »

Ed Douglas

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2010, 07:08:32 AM »
And it tastes good, too.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2010, 02:50:16 AM »
And it tastes good, too.

Yes!
You know I realize it may not even be possible for many people to stock up on, grow, consume pineapple as part of the their survival camp and as part of the aftertimes. I just feel it is worth the effort.
It seems to be one of those foods engineered and put here for people to heal themselves. The canned pineapple would have some benefits but it would have lost some of its nutrients.
If not possible to get much of it in the stored goods, bromelain capsules would give a lot of those benefits.
In fact the bromelain is mainly in the stem of the pineapple which is not eaten. The stem is used to make the bromelain capsules. Well more later on this... I am not sure how a group could get the bromelain out of the stem... will see if there is some method. Eating the fruit and also getting the nutrients out of the stem and also having lots of bromelain tablets would be the best thing.
All The Best,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2010, 02:59:21 AM »
A Note: You will need to shop around and experiment to find the pineapple which does not "bite" the tongue. There are some differences from one pineapple to another...Just a little more or repeating what the bromelain does, Yowbarb
...
The World's Healthiest Foods
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=34

Bromelain is a complex mixture of substances that can be extracted from the stem and core fruit of the pineapple. Among dozens of components known to exist in this crude extract, the best studied components are a group of protein-digesting enzymes (called cysteine proteinases). Originally, researchers believed that these enzymes provided the key health benefits found in bromelain, a popular dietary supplement containing these pineapple extracts. In addition, researchers believed that these benefits were primarily limited to help with digestion in the intestinal tract. However, further studies have shown that bromelain has a wide variety of health benefits, and that many of these benefits may not be related to the different enzymes found in this extract. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by therapeutic doses of bromelain when taken as a dietary supplement. Studies are not available, however, to show these same potential benefits in relationship to normal intake of pineapple within a normal meal plan.

Bromelain extracts can be obtained from both the fruit core and stems of pineapple. Potentially important chemical differences appear to exist between extracts obtained from the stem versus the core fruit. However, the practical relevance of these differences is not presently understood. Most of the laboratory research on bromelain has been conducted using stem-based extracts, however.

Although healthcare practitioners have reported improved digestion in their patients with an increase in pineapple as their "fruit of choice" within a meal plan, we haven't seen published studies that document specific changes in digestion following consumption of the fruit (versus supplementation with the purified extract. However, we suspect that the core fruit will eventually turn out to show some unique health-supportive properties, including possible digestion-related and anti-inflammatory benefits.

Antioxidant Protection and Immune Support

Vitamin C is the body's primary water-soluble antioxidant, defending all aqueous areas of the body against free radicals that attack and damage normal cells. Free radicals have been shown to promote the artery plaque build-up of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease, cause the airway spasm that leads to asthma attacks, damage the cells of the colon so they become colon cancer cells, and contribute to the joint pain and disability seen in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain why diets rich in vitamin C have been shown to be useful for preventing or reducing the severity of all of these conditions. In addition, vitamin C is vital for the proper function of the immune system, making it a nutrient to turn to for the prevention of recurrent ear infections, colds, and flu.

Manganese and Thiamin (Vitamin B1) for Energy Production and Antioxidant Defenses

Pineapple is an excellent source the trace mineral manganese, which is an essential cofactor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. For example, the key oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase, which disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells), requires manganese. Just one cup of fresh pineapple supplies 128.0% of the DV for this very important trace mineral. In addition to manganese, pineapple is a good source of thiamin, a B vitamin that acts as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions central to energy production.

Protection against Macular Degeneration

Your mother may have told you carrots would keep your eyes bright as a child, but as an adult, it looks like fruit is even more important for keeping your sight. Data reported in a study published in the Archives of Ophthalmology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults, by 36%, compared to persons who consume less than 1.5 servings of fruit daily.

In this study, which involved over 110,000 women and men, researchers evaluated the effect of study participants' consumption of fruits; vegetables; the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E; and carotenoids on the development of early ARMD or neovascular ARMD, a more severe form of the illness associated with vision loss. While, surprisingly, intakes of vegetables, antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids were not strongly related to incidence of either form of ARMD, fruit intake was definitely protective against the severe form of this vision-destroying disease. Three servings of fruit may sound like a lot to eat each day, but pineapple can help you reach this goal. Add fresh pineapple to your morning smoothie, lunch time yogurt, any fruit and most vegetable salads. For example, try adding chunks of pineapple to your next coleslaw or carrot salad.

Description

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, from which one of its most important health-promoting compounds, the enzyme bromelain, was named. The Spanish name for pineapple, pina, and the root of its English name, reflects the fruit's visual similarity to the pinecone.

Pineapples are actually not just one fruit but a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an "eye," the rough spiny marking on the pineapple's surface.

Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves. The fibrous flesh of pineapple is yellow in color and has a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

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