Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 40504 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #210 on: July 19, 2017, 05:59:37 AM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for sharing all these details.  So when you make the series of different strengths of a single substance (such as the 1C through 12 C example), is each separate dilution strength used for a different purpose?  Seems as if you have nearly infinite dilutions possible.

I don't know how Hahnemann explained it, but the best way that I have been able to comprehend the principle of more dilute=stronger is to think of the cells of the human body as having sub-atomic parts that we have not yet discovered or adequately described.  So very dilute homeopathics might be able to reach these nooks and crannies, while macroscopic meds would be like trying to fit the camel through the eye of a needle.  In the debate over how long to brew colloidal silver, for example, some people feel that less time is better for similar reasons.

Re: your favorite herbs - hope you'll post more pics of your garden now that we're in the prime of the growing season :)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #211 on: July 20, 2017, 09:49:32 AM »
Vitex agnus, also known as chastetree, has a 5-star PFAF medicinal rating.  PFAF says that the seeds have been used for millennia to balance female hormones, particularly correcting estrogen dominance.  Other effects on the female reproduction system include restoring stopped menstruation, increasing fertility, restoring ovulation, easing menstrual pain and premenstrual tension, and helping to smooth the transition to menopause.  Seeds and fruits are also diuretic, diaphoretic (causing perspiration), febrifuge (breaking fevers), galactogogue (promoting lactation), sedative, stomachic, and paradoxically both aphrodesiac and anaphrodesiac, depending upon where the hormonal balance is needed.  A tincture of the berries relieves paralysis, as well as limb pain and weakness.  The plant also has opthalmic uses, as well as being carminative, suppressing appetite and promoting sleep.  It has not been demonstrated to support the male reproductive system.

Non-medicinal uses include yellow-dye production and basket making, as well as providing a pepper substitute.  It is hardy to zone 5 and a good source of nectar for bees.

I wait until flower heads have dried in autumn, and then harvest and place them in re-usable cloth tea bags with drawstrings.



R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Phlox for aspirin
« Reply #212 on: July 20, 2017, 01:02:02 PM »
Garden Phlox is in full bloom now, and is a natural source of salicylates for aspirin.  A database called The Pherobase posts a very long list of phytochemicals:

http://www.pherobase.com/database/floral/floral-taxa-species-Phlox-paniculata.php

Posting photo from the bee nectary garden:
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 02:25:49 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #213 on: July 20, 2017, 04:04:24 PM »
Vitex agnus, also known as chastetree, has a 5-star PFAF medicinal rating.  PFAF says that the seeds have been used for millennia to balance female hormones, particularly correcting estrogen dominance.  Other effects on the female reproduction system include restoring stopped menstruation, increasing fertility, restoring ovulation, easing menstrual pain and premenstrual tension, and helping to smooth the transition to menopause.  Seeds and fruits are also diuretic, diaphoretic (causing perspiration), febrifuge (breaking fevers), galactogogue (promoting lactation), sedative, stomachic, and paradoxically both aphrodesiac and anaphrodesiac, depending upon where the hormonal balance is needed.  A tincture of the berries relieves paralysis, as well as limb pain and weakness.  The plant also has opthalmic uses, as well as being carminative, suppressing appetite and promoting sleep.  It has not been demonstrated to support the male reproductive system.

Non-medicinal uses include yellow-dye production and basket making, as well as providing a pepper substitute.  It is hardy to zone 5 and a good source of nectar for bees.

I wait until flower heads have dried in autumn, and then harvest and place them in re-usable cloth tea bags with drawstrings.
Wow, that's a lot of help from one herb.  I had read and heard of its female hormone assistance, but not really much else, so it's a very versatile plant.  It must be what is called an adaptogen--my herbalist friend said that an adaptogen such as this one, or cayenne, or ginseng, or others, will evoke one reaction when needed, but when the opposite is needed, it will instead evoke that one!  Sounds like a plant with ESP!  Thanks for posting.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #214 on: July 20, 2017, 04:28:42 PM »
Ilinda, Thank you so much for sharing all these details.  So when you make the series of different strengths of a single substance (such as the 1C through 12 C example), is each separate dilution strength used for a different purpose?  Seems as if you have nearly infinite dilutions possible.

I don't know how Hahnemann explained it, but the best way that I have been able to comprehend the principle of more dilute=stronger is to think of the cells of the human body as having sub-atomic parts that we have not yet discovered or adequately described.  So very dilute homeopathics might be able to reach these nooks and crannies, while macroscopic meds would be like trying to fit the camel through the eye of a needle.  In the debate over how long to brew colloidal silver, for example, some people feel that less time is better for similar reasons.

Re: your favorite herbs - hope you'll post more pics of your garden now that we're in the prime of the growing season :)
My understanding of the various dilutions is that one never knows for sure which dilution will work, so often people will start with 6C or 12C, but depending on the situation, may even start with 200C (emergency).  One thing I've read is that, theoretically, at the 12C dilution, there are no particles or material remaining from the original material.  Still, most preps are available at at least the 30C level.   I read that Hahnemann(sp) used mainly the 30C potency, so that is why I often make the dilutions from 1C through 30C of a given herb.  But all of these dilutions are what you get when making it at home, whereas when you order kits, you will rarely receive any given named prep in more than one strength.  For example I have a kit of emergency preps, and they are all 200C.  And have several other kits of non-emergency dilutions, and they are mostly 30C, possibly all are 30C.  (If you felt you needed more than the usual 5-7 drops, you could just use more drops, or dose more often, since you're working with what you bought, which was 30C.)  Thus, my 1C through 30C wormseed (for goat worms), and which I have not yet used, will be experimental.  If I need it, I might start with 1C, being cautious with new things, and see how the 1C performs.  Also, when I run out of a given 30C, I can then go back to the lesser dilutions to make a new 30C bottle.

That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing, grain of sand, for example, is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.  Anyway, taking that a step further, think that a grain of sand is matter.  But it has a huge amount of potential energy; said another way, that grain of sand can be converted into a huge amount of energy, or that grain of sand will gradually disappear as it is converted into its innate energy.

Anyway, each time we "succuss and dilute", we are replacing some of the matter/material with energy, so that neither the matter nor energy can be destroyed, but can be converted back and forth, energy to matter, matter to energy, etc.  So as we dilute and remove matter, we are simultaneously amplifying an amount of energy commensurate with the matter removed, so that eventually (theoretically at 12C) we have no matter left, but all of the energy that can be calculated by E=mc2.  I did calculate out one time the amount of energy trapped in a 1 gram piece of rock and it was incredibly huge.  Anyway, think of the energy that continues to be amplified in the dilutions greater than 12C. 

Sorry if I blather on about this, but it's good to hear your take on it too, since even the experts still cannot explain it any better than you or I just did.  Well, maybe Hahnemann did and we haven't read it yet.  Hope this hasn't been too garbled!

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #215 on: July 20, 2017, 05:42:35 PM »
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neither the matter nor energy can be destroyed, but can be converted back and forth, energy to matter, matter to energy

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...that grain of sand can be converted into a huge amount of energy, ...that grain of sand will gradually disappear as it is converted into its innate energy.

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I did calculate out one time the amount of energy trapped in a 1 gram piece of rock and it was incredibly huge.

What an elegant explanation of the potential waiting to be tapped into as we grow in our understanding of how we can co-create with Heaven, as well. :)

Jimfarmer

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #216 on: July 20, 2017, 08:17:25 PM »
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That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing ... is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.

Well, dilution does not destroy mass, so that can't be the mechanism of "dilute is stronger".  And if it did, the energy would not all be contained in the frequencies that the solid mass was contributing to the liquid.

Here is my guess.  Water (and alcohol?) molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.  And, the more contact between liquid and solid, the more the liquid components will vibrate at the same frequencies that the solid contributes.  Now, "Homeopaths have discovered that the effect of homeopathic medicines is strengthed upon successive dilutions as long as the medicine is succussed (shaken) between each dilution" (http://homeopathy.inbaltimore.org/faq.html), and the shaking of the mixture causes increased contact between the liquid molecules-clusters and the solid molecules.  Even after the mixture is so dilute that only a few molecules of the solid remain, the shaking makes the liquid's different molecules-clusters contact each other, and so the effect of induced resonance is continued, giving a liquid in which many of its components are vibrating at the frequencies that the solid was contributing.

I suspect that the resonance phenomena that Dr Emoto discovered might be relevant also. Note that he decontaminated some large bodies of water by adding only some liters of energized water.  Along those lines, the "dilute is stronger" effect might be a result of the intention and concentration of the person who is shaking the mixtures.   Hmmm, many research projects arise.

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #217 on: July 21, 2017, 02:46:28 AM »
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Water...molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.

So this is how the Universal Solvent works?

Jimfarmer

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #218 on: July 21, 2017, 11:02:36 AM »
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Water...molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.

So this is how the Universal Solvent works?

Oh, I don't think so; my knowledge of chemistry is not that deep, but dissolving occurs when the molecules of the solvent break the electrical bonds between molecules of the solute.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #219 on: July 21, 2017, 06:34:45 PM »
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That is an interesting way of conceptualizing the "dilute is stronger" idea about homeopathy.  I too have thought a lot about this, and here is my own 2 cents:
Think of E=mc2, Einstein's famous equation that says the energy in a given thing ... is equal to its mass multiplied by the speed of light, squared.

Well, dilution does not destroy mass, so that can't be the mechanism of "dilute is stronger".  And if it did, the energy would not all be contained in the frequencies that the solid mass was contributing to the liquid.

Here is my guess.  Water (and alcohol?) molecules and clusters have many more resonant frequencies of vibration than the emission-absorption frequencies of the individual atoms, and so the liquid's components can resonate to many of the frequencies that the solid mass is contributing.  And, the more contact between liquid and solid, the more the liquid components will vibrate at the same frequencies that the solid contributes.  Now, "Homeopaths have discovered that the effect of homeopathic medicines is strengthed upon successive dilutions as long as the medicine is succussed (shaken) between each dilution" (http://homeopathy.inbaltimore.org/faq.html), and the shaking of the mixture causes increased contact between the liquid molecules-clusters and the solid molecules.  Even after the mixture is so dilute that only a few molecules of the solid remain, the shaking makes the liquid's different molecules-clusters contact each other, and so the effect of induced resonance is continued, giving a liquid in which many of its components are vibrating at the frequencies that the solid was contributing.

I suspect that the resonance phenomena that Dr Emoto discovered might be relevant also. Note that he decontaminated some large bodies of water by adding only some liters of energized water.  Along those lines, the "dilute is stronger" effect might be a result of the intention and concentration of the person who is shaking the mixtures.   Hmmm, many research projects arise.
Dilution does not destroy mass, but repeated, serial dilutions will eventually remove any traces of the original material/mass.  For example, put 1 gram of sodium chloride in 100 ml water for your 1% solution.  Now, with or without succussing, if you remove 1ml from that 100ml solution, and place that 1ml into a new container of 99ml H20 to make a second 100 ml solution, you will have even fewer molecules of sodium chloride than before.  If you continue this type of serial dilution, there will be a point at which statistics will tell you it is a near (or real) impossibility that any of the sodium chloride remains in the resulting solution.  That has to happen eventually.  At some point, 12C according to some, there will be no traces of the actual material left.  So, dilution does not destroy mass, but it is diluted out, little by little.

The "dilute is stronger" theme was also touched on, without the mention of "homeopathy", in Theo Colburn's book, "Our Stolen Future, in which she described findings which surprised her--that often some toxic organic synthetic chemicals show signs of greater toxicity, the more dilute they are!   IIRC she was discussing the effects of those toxins on fetal development, and was totally surprised to see that "less" can mean "more".

Yes, this is a field that is wide open for more research.  Funny thing, all the naysayers are probably unaware that homeopathy in the hands of someone with a lot of knowledge and know-how can be used successfully in veterinary medicine, making it difficult to claim "placebo effect".  There are at least two books about homeopathy for livestock, each written by a veterinarian.

One type of research would be a good idea:  what effect does the potency of the initial solution have on the end product?  IOW, if we start with a 1% tincture of wild yam in ethanol, as compared to a 10% tincture of the same ingredients, what are the properties of the final homeopathic preps?  I don't know yet, but am pondering comparing several "runs" in order to determine the results.  Logic says the 10% tincture would produce something 10X as potent as the 1% tincture.  But logic might not work when we are dealing with homeopathy, and as we have found, the ideas underlying homeopathy (successive dilutions with succussion produce amplification of effects) are actually counterintuitive.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #220 on: July 23, 2017, 05:30:44 PM »
Milk thistle is a very valuable herb, especially for liver health and this year's crop is probably the best I've grown.  The flowers are very short-lived, one day it seems, and the drought has affected them a bit, but pic is attached anyway.  One thing for sure--you won't want to try to weed these without thick gloves.  Bumblebees seem to like it, as well as the similar flower of cardoon, whose leaves are on the left, somewhat overhanging the milk thistle.

Cardoon, BTW, is a celery substitute.

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #221 on: July 24, 2017, 06:11:50 AM »
Thank you for bringing this one up Ilinda, I agree that it's one of the more important herbs.  Nice photo!