Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 37929 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #90 on: December 28, 2012, 07:08:44 AM »
I randomly remembered kimchi - kim chi  as a good food especially in wintertime, dur to how it seems to help me stop a cold etc.
I saw kim-chi for the first time in WA state. I saw jars of it kept cold up in the produce section.
In L.A. in some of the neighborhoods I saw great big jars of it for sale. I realy love the taste. It is cabbage and other veges in a jar with garlic, ginger chile, etc.
A couple of times when I was just feeling like I was coming down with a cold, I ate a bunch of Kim chee, and the cold symptoms went away.  ;D
I could not claim that would happen for everyone...
- Yowbarb
...
This looks like the kind I saw in a WA state supermarket:


...
Natural Cures during cold and flu season:

http://www.catalogs.com/info/health/natural-cures-during-cold-and-flu-season.html

Kimchi, Sauerkraut, Kefir, and Yogurt

Kimchi (pronounced kim'-chee) is a Korean spicy fermented side dish that has been getting a lot of press since the BBC published a report by scientists in Seoul, Korea who found that 11 of 13 chickens infected with the avian flu started to recover after they were fed an extract of kimchi. It is important to note that there have been no published reports of its effect on people affected with the new strain of avian flu. The key ingredient is thought to be a natural organic acid called lactic acid, that's also found in sauerkraut, milk, yogurt, kefir (a yogurt-like effervescent beverage), meat, and beer. In fact recent reports also show sauerkraut being used to treat chickens.

Although research hasn't yet shown that fermented cabbage is active against the avian flu, there is research suggesting that lactic acid in other forms activates the immune system against influenza and cold viruses. Popular probiotic "friendly bacteria" supplements such as lactobacillus acidophilus produce lactic acid. A German study found that those who took a daily probiotic supplement had significantly less respiratory tract infections and people who caught the flu had had fewer symptoms and shorter fever duration.
...

Rowdy Cowgirl site, How to Make  Homemade Kimchi

http://rowdychowgirl.com/2011/03/14/how-to-make-homemade-kimchi/

(Yowbarb Note: Next post will have the instructions on how to make and possibly a bunch of photos and/or a video.)

...........................
« Last Edit: December 28, 2012, 07:12:04 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #91 on: January 20, 2013, 06:33:51 AM »
Hi All,
this article mentions three healing foods - blueberries plums and peaches.
"extracts from peaches and plums killed breast cancer cells, even the most aggressive kinds."
- Yowbarb

http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/subscribe/cn-2/index2.php?sb=GA5CUSD&affid=cacnp2&subid=c111&gclid=CM7N4_KP97QCFQGvnQodDjMA-w

Dr. Victor Marchione's latest special report reveals seven natural cancer fighting remedies that could help you reduce your chances of getting this dreaded disease.

These are 100% natural remedies that you can easily acquire... maybe even at your local grocery store! Remedies like the two fruits that have been shown to kill breast cancer.

That's right. Texas researchers have found that extracts from peaches and plums killed breast cancer cells, even the most aggressive kinds. Not only did the cancerous cells die, but also no nearby healthy cells were affected.

The study suggests that two polyphenols (plant-based chemicals) are responsible for the cancer cell deaths. It was published recently in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. The phenols are organic compounds that occur specifically in fruits.

Researchers originally studied the antioxidants and phytonutrients in plums and found them to match or exceed those in the blueberry — a powerful fruit previously considered superior to other fruits in those categories.

The next step was to see if these antioxidants had any anticancer properties. They chose breast cancer, which is a major problem (to put it mildly), as it is one of the most common cancers for women. According to the National Cancer Institute, there were 192,370 new cases of breast cancer in females and 1,910 cases in males in 2009. That year, 40,170 women and 440 men died from breast cancer. The World Health Organization reports that breast cancer accounts for 16% of the cancer deaths of women globally.

Researchers used extracts from two everyday fruits: the "Rich Lady" peach; and the "Black Splendor" plum. The extracts killed even the most aggressive cancer cell, but left normal cells alone, which is very significant. In regular chemotherapy, normal cells are killed along with cancerous ones, causing major side effects.
 
A closer look determined that two specific phenols — chlorogenic and neochlorogenic — were responsible for this targeted kill. Both are very common in fruits, the researchers said, but stone fruits such as plums and peaches have especially high levels.
 
The team said laboratory tests also confirmed that the compounds prevented cancer from growing in animals as well. The researchers want to see how these compounds could be incorporated into the growing of peaches and plums.
 
It's cancer breakthroughs like this that are revealed by Dr. Marchione and the Doctors Health Press team in their latest special report: The Seven Fighting Remedies to Shield You From Cancer.

And the best part, this report is absolutely FREE!
http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/subscribe/cn-2/index2.php?sb=GA5CUSD&affid=cacnp2&subid=c111&gclid=CM7N4_KP97QCFQGvnQodDjMA-w


Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #92 on: January 29, 2013, 10:17:06 AM »
Grow your own medicines.
Yowbarb
..................................................................
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/2008-06-01/Homegrown-Medicine-Grow-Medicinal-Herbs.aspx     

Homegrown Medicine

Explore the many benefits of planting medicinal herbs.
By Harvey Ussery
 June/July 2008

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/2008-06-01/Homegrown-Medicine-Grow-Medicinal-Herbs.aspx#ixzz2JOE0Lhdn

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #93 on: February 12, 2013, 06:10:43 PM »
At first when you see the page it looks like maybe there's not much on it. You need to scroll and keep scrolling big spaces in there.  ;) Please check out the site for more links and images. On the page is info on herbs along with simple recipes and other subjects.
- Yowbarb


http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/
 

1Posted by cilivianous at 09:18 
The Dearthbox: A low-cost, self-watering planter

 
Joining many other excellent earthbox instructables, meet ours, the Dearthbox! The Dearthbox costs about $13-16 per box, and can grow up to three plants, depending on the type of plant. At our house in CA, we've been testing these out for the last month or so. Our tomatoes are thriving and it's a relief to know our plants aren't parched in the afternoon heat.

Even if you've already planted stuff, you could still transplant to the Dearthbox and save some water this summer.

This instructable shows you the materials we used, the steps we followed, and how to plant a fairly big plant, as well as how to plant seedlings.

STEP 1: GATHER YOUR MATERIALS

If you already own most of the cutting tools and the drill, this instructable costs about $13-15. We got everything at Home Depot, but you can find similar stuff at any hardware store.

Materials pictured:

2 big paint buckets that stack (~5 gallons each)
1 lid
1 plastic tub OR drain grate (The height of the tub/drain grate should be approximately the same height as the gap between the two buckets when stacked)
1 2' long 1" diameter plastic pipe (make sure it is longer than the height of the buckets when stacked)*
1 mesh baggie (find them as packaging for fruit, veggies, other stuff!)

Tools pictured:

drill with 1 inch bit and 1/4" masonry bit
utility knife with extra blades
rounded file
saw
permanent marker
tarp (collects all the plastic bits!)

Not pictured:

black plastic garbage bags
seedlings or established plants
potting mix
compost
fertilizer

*I've read different things about using PVC after making this first version, which does use PVC. This project is made entirely of plastic, so if plastics in general bother you, you probably should not make this. If PVC specifically bothers you, it's easy to find other plastic pipes that will work, just poke around the garden supply store. Also, Greenpeace has a big database of alternatives. What do you think about PVC? What alternatives have you discovered?

STEP 2: MARK THE BUCKETS

1) Hole for wicking basket
On the bottom of the first bucket, trace your drain grate or plastic tub and mark a circle on the bottom of the first bucket. Be sure your circle is smaller than the lip of the container.

2) Hole for pipe
Next, mark a hole for the pipe, also 1/2" from the wall of the bucket

3) Side drainage holes
On the side of the second bucket (not the one you've already marked!), measure and mark drainage holes. Finding this measurement is pretty easy--just place the buckets one next to the other and figure out how much of a gap there is between them when they stack together. Mark just below that line. Mark two drainage holes, one on each side.

4) Second hole for pipe
On the lid, mark a hole for the pipe (1/2" from the edge)

5) Holes for plants
Next mark holes for the seedlings on the lid, or one big hole for an established plant

Pictured is the finished bucket lid, so you get a sense of what the holes will be doing once you plant your dearthbox.

STEP 3: CUT THE HOLES IN THE BUCKETS

For the big holes on the first bucket and the lid, start them with a drill, using a 1" masonry bit. Use the utility knife to widen the holes.

Cut drainage holes in the bottom of your first bucket, using a 1/4" diameter drill bit.

Next, cut the side drainage holes on the second bucket.

Remember, do not cut the side drainage holes in the bucket with the holes in the bottom.

You can smooth the edges with the file if you want.

Note that I don't have a picture of this process for the bucket lid, but you want to do the same thing for the pipe hole and the plant holes you marked in step 2 on the lid.

STEP 4: PREPARE THE PIPE

Cut an angled segment from the bottom of the pipe, using your hacksaw.

The reason you're doing this is so that water can flow out of the pipe when it's at the bottom of the buckets.

STEP 5: ASSEMBLE THE WICKING BASKET

Either line the drain grate with mesh, or cut holes in your solid plastic container. We found these as a three pack at the dollar store. You could also use food containers, etc., as long as there is enough of a lip and they are the right height.

Even though it's significantly more expensive, I highly recommend the drain grate option. They both seem to be performing equally well, but the drain cover just seems sturdier and better.

The last photo is of the wicking basket with dirt inside already. You don't have to do that part yet, but this shows you how the netting helps contain the dirt.

STEP 6: ASSEMBLE THE BUCKET!

Place the assembled wicking basket in the bottom of the bucket.

Push the pipe through the holes in the lid and the bottom of the inner bucket

Stack two buckets, with the basket hanging between the two.

Now you're ready to plant!

STEP 7: PLANTING

Use your favorite potting mix, compost, plants, seedlings, etc., and put it all together! This part is really up to you, but I would encourage you to soak the wicking basket first, and only use a small amount of fertilizer. The bucket recycles it, so you probably won't need to add fertilizer again for a very long time.

If you cut smaller holes in the lid, gently thread the plants through the holes before lowering the lid completely.

If you cut one big hole, line the top of the bucket with black plastic. This helps keep the potting mix moist. (see Mr. Beefhead's comment about why it's important to use potting mix)

To water the dearthbox, just pour water down the pipe. You know it's full when water comes out the drainage holes on the sides. We started with moist earth to make the wicking basket's job easier.

Thanks for checking out our instructable! If something doesn't make sense, please tell me and I'll fix it!

ps: we just got our copy of Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen's The Urban Homestead(http://homegrownrevolution.com) in the mail, and it's great! Their SWC recipe is really really similar to ours, but with a few cool extras and best of all, lots of advice about which plants do well in SWCs and which plants do not. You should definitely check out their book if you're using or thinking about using any sort of earthbox.

source : http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Dearthbox-A-low-cost-self-watering-planter/?ALLSTEPS
 
[  Yowbarb Note: Much more on page  http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/  ]

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #94 on: February 12, 2013, 06:13:19 PM »
http://homesteadingsurvivalism.blogspot.com/

•   2Posted by cilivianous at 15:23 
•   vendredi 8 février 2013tips for creating a wonderful hanging basket or container
•   
•   Here are several tips for creating a wonderful hanging basket or container this summer.  The first is to use an artificial soil composed  you can chose  peat moss.  And soils such  Pro-Mix use perlite, peat, and other ingredients to produce a soil that will not compact over the summer.  Real garden soil compacts and turns into concrete under the pressure of regular watering.  And when it does, plant roots stop growing because they require good open spaces to move into and absorb nutrients.  Hard, compacted soils do not grow good plants so do not use real soil in your containers.  I re-use my artificial potting soil from year to year.  I dump it out of the pot. Chew it up with a shovel to cut up all last year’s roots and add approximately 10 % by volume of compost. The compost increases air spaces and gives plants a boost in healthy nutrition.
•   
•   Feed your plants weekly.  Nitrogen, the engine of plant growth, is water soluble and as you water your containers from the top the dissolved nitrogen is leaving from the bottom.   I use a fish-emulsion liquid feed with seaweed to provide all the trace nutrients my plants require and recommend it highly.  You can use any liquid plant food (like Miracle Grow or Shultz) to promote growth.  Compost tea is the Cadillac of liquid plant food and if you make your own compost tea, your plants will respond with bigger and better blooms as well as increased vigour. 
•   
•   And finally, no matter the size of the container, it is important to soak it all the way to the bottom at each watering.  Continue watering until water emerges from the pot bottom.  This ensures the roots can reach all parts of the container and grow properly.

Survival101

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #95 on: March 10, 2013, 11:05:54 AM »

This appears to be an herb that everyone needs to have a good quanity of. Seems to be available in Middle Eastern/Indian Food Stores as a common spice and inexpensive, too...

Black Seed - 'The Remedy for Everything, But Death'
 
This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic's pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.

The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa, have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial. While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.

The earliest record of its cultivation and use come from ancient Egypt. Black seed oil, in fact, was found in Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb, dating back to approximately 3,300 years ago. In Arabic cultures, black cumin is known as Habbatul barakah, meaning the "seed of blessing." It is also believed that the Islamic prophet Mohammed said of it that it is "a remedy for all diseases except death."

Many of black cumin's traditionally ascribed health benefits have been thoroughly confirmed in the biomedical literature. In fact, since 1964, there have been 458 published, peer-reviewed studies referencing it.

We have indexed salient research, available to view on GreenMedInfo.com on our Black Seed (Nigella Sativa) page, on well over 40 health conditions that may be benefited from the use of the herb, including over 20 distinct pharmacological actions it expresses, such as:

Analgesic (Pain-Killing)
Anti-Bacterial
Anti-Inflammatory
Anti-Ulcer
Anti-Cholinergic
Anti-Fungal
Ant-Hypertensive
Antioxidant
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Bronchodilator
Gluconeogenesis Inhibitor (Anti-Diabetic)
Hepatoprotective (Liver Protecting)
Hypotensive
Insulin Sensitizing
Interferon Inducer
Leukotriene Antagonist
Renoprotective (Kidney Protecting)
Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitor

These 22 pharmacological actions are only a subset of a far wider number of beneficial properties intrinsic to the black seed. While it is remarkable that this seed has the ability to positively modulate so many different biological pathways, this is actually a rather common occurrence among traditional plant medicines.

Our project has identified over 1600 natural compounds with a wide range of health benefits, and we are only in our first 5 years of casual indexing. There are tens of thousands of other substances that have already been researched, with hundreds of thousands of studies supporting their medicinal value (MEDLINE, whence our study abstracts come, has over 600,000 studies classified as related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine).

Take turmeric, for example. We have identified research indicating its value in over 600 health conditions, while also expressing over 160 different potentially beneficial pharmacological actions. You can view the quick summary of over 1500 studies we have summarized on our Turmeric Research page, which includes an explorative video on turmeric. Professional database members are further empowered to manipulate the results according to their search criteria, i.e. pull up and print to PDF the 61 studies on turmeric and breast cancer. This, of course, should help folks realize how voluminous the supportive literature indicating the medicinal value of natural substances, such as turmeric and black seed, really is.

Black seed has been researched for very specific health conditions.

Some of the most compelling applications include:

Type 2 Diabetes: Two grams of black seed a day resulted in reduced fasting glucose, decreased insulin resistance, increased beta-cell function, and reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human subjects.[ii]
Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Black seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple eradication therapy.[iii]

Epilepsy: Black seeds were traditionally known to have anticonvulsive properties. A 2007 study with epileptic children, whose condition was refractory to conventional drug treatment, found that a water extract significantly reduced seizure activity.[iv]

High Blood Pressure: The daily use of 100 and 200 mg of black seed extract, twice daily, for 2 months, was found to have a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension.[v]

Asthma: Thymoquinone, one of the main active constituents within Nigella sativa (black cumin), is superior to the drug fluticasone in an animal model of asthma.[vi] Another study, this time in human subjects, found that boiled water extracts of black seed have relatively potent antiasthmatic effect on asthmatic airways.[vii]

Acute Tonsillopharyngitis: characterized by tonsil or pharyngeal inflammation (i.e. sore throat), mostly viral in origin, black seed capsules (in combination with Phyllanthus niruri) have been found to significantly alleviate throat pain, and reduce the need for pain-killers, in human subjects.[viii]

Chemical Weapons Injury: A randomized, placebo-controlled human study of chemical weapons injured patients found that boiled water extracts of black seed reduced respiratory symptoms, chest wheezing, and pulmonary function test values, as well as reduced the need for drug treatment.[ix]

Colon Cancer: Cell studies have found that black seed extract compares favorably to the chemoagent 5-fluoruracil in the suppression of colon cancer growth, but with a far higher safety profile.
  • Animal research has found that black seed oil has significant inhibitory effects against colon cancer in rats, without observable side effects.[xi]
MRSA: Black seed has anti-bacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.[xii]

Opiate Addiction/Withdrawal: A study on 35 opiate addicts found black seed as an effective therapy in long-term treatment of opioid dependence.[xiii]

Sometimes the biblical reference to 'faith the size of a mustard seed moving mountains' comes to mind in connection with natural substances like black seeds. After all, do seeds not contain within them the very hope for continuance of the entire species that bore it? This super-saturated state of the seed, where life condenses itself down into an intensely miniaturized holographic fragment of itself, promising the formation of future worlds within itself, is the very emblem of life's immense and immortal power.

If we understand the true nature of the seed, how much life (past, present and future) is contained within it, it will not seem so far-fetched that it is capable of conquering antibiotic resistant bacteria, healing the body from chemical weapons poisoning, or stimulate the regeneration of dying insulin-producing beta cells in the diabetic, to name but only a fraction of black seed's experimentally-confirmed powers.

Moving the mountain of inertia and falsity associated with the conventional concept of disease, is a task well-suited for seeds and not chemicals. The greatest difference, of course, between a seed and a patented synthetic chemical (i.e. pharmaceutical drug), is that Nature (God) made the former, and men with profit-motives and a deranged understanding of the nature of the body made the latter.

The time, no doubt, has come for food, seeds, herbs, plants, sunlight, air, clean water, and yes, love, to assume once again their central place in medicine, which is to say, the art and science of facilitating self-healing within the human body. Failing this, the conventional medical system will crumble under the growing weight of its own corruption, ineptitude, and iatrogenic suffering (and subsequent financial liability) it causes. To the degree that it reforms itself, utilizing non-patented and non-patentable natural compounds with actual healing properties, a brighter future awaits on the horizon. To the degree that it fails, folks will learn to take back control over their health themselves, which is why black seed, and other food-medicines, hold the key to self-empowerment.

References:________________________________________
Domestication of plants in the Old World (3 ed.). Oxford University Press. 2000. p. 206. ISBN 0-19-850356-3.
[ii] Abdullah O Bamosa, Huda Kaatabi, Fatma M Lebdaa, Abdul-Muhssen Al Elq, Ali Al-Sultanb. Effect of Nigella sativa seeds on the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Oct-Dec;54(4):344-54. PMID: 21675032
[iii] Eyad M Salem, Talay Yar, Abdullah O Bamosa, Abdulaziz Al-Quorain, Mohamed I Yasawy, Raed M Alsulaiman, Muhammad A Randhawa. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul-Sep;16(3):207-14. PMID: 20616418
[iv] Javad Akhondian, Ali Parsa, Hassan Rakhshande. The effect of Nigella sativa L. (black cumin seed) on intractable pediatric seizures. Med Sci Monit. 2007 Dec;13(12):CR555-9. PMID: 18049435
[v] Farshad Roghani Dehkordi, Amir Farhad Kamkhah. Antihypertensive effect of Nigella sativa seed extract in patients with mild hypertension. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006 Apr;39(4):421-9. Epub 2006 Apr 3. PMID: 18705755
[vi] Rana Keyhanmanesh, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mohammad Javad Eslamizadeh, Saeed Khamneh, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi. The effect of thymoquinone, the main constituent of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and white blood cell count in lung lavage of sensitized guinea pigs. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Oct 29;126(1):102-7. Epub 2009 Aug 8. PMID: 19711253
[vii] M H Boskabady, N Mohsenpoor, L Takaloo . Antiasthmatic effect of Nigella sativa in airways of asthmatic patients. Phytomedicine. 2010 Feb 8. Epub 2010 Feb 8. PMID: 20149611
[viii] M Dirjomuljono, I Kristyono, R R Tjandrawinata, D Nofiarny. Symptomatic treatment of acute tonsillo-pharyngitis patients with a combination of Nigella sativa and Phyllanthus niruri extract. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jun;46(6):295-306. PMID: 18541126
[ix] Mohammad H Boskabady, Javad Farhadi. The possible prophylactic effect of Nigella sativa seed aqueous extract on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests on chemical war victims: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Nov;14(9):1137-44. PMID: 18991514
  • Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima. Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xi] Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima . Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xii] Abdul Hannan, Sidrah Saleem, Saadia Chaudhary, Muhammad Barkaat, Muhammad Usman Arshad. Anti bacterial activity of Nigella sativa against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Jul-Sep;20(3):72-4. PMID: 19610522
[xiii] Sibghatullah Sangi, Shahida P Ahmed, Muhammad Aslam Channa, Muhammad Ashfaq, Shah Murad Mastoi . A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: Nigella sativa 500 mg. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Apr-Jun;20(2):118-24. PMID: 19385474

Source: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/black-seed-remedy-everything-death

JKB

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #96 on: March 10, 2013, 02:46:56 PM »
Thanks S101.  I will look for some of that for sure.
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

Schi-502

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #97 on: March 10, 2013, 09:24:54 PM »
Me too.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #98 on: March 11, 2013, 10:12:52 AM »

This appears to be an herb that everyone needs to have a good quanity of. Seems to be available in Middle Eastern/Indian Food Stores as a common spice and inexpensive, too...

Black Seed - 'The Remedy for Everything, But Death'
 
This humble, but immensely powerful seed, kills MRSA, heals the chemical weapon poisoned body, stimulates regeneration of the dying beta cells within the diabetic's pancreas, and yet too few even know it exists.

The seeds of the annual flowering plant, Nigella Sativa, have been prized for their healing properties since time immemorial. While frequently referred to among English-speaking cultures as Roman coriander, black sesame, black cumin, black caraway and onion seed, it is known today primarily as black seed, which is at the very least an accurate description of its physical appearance.

The earliest record of its cultivation and use come from ancient Egypt. Black seed oil, in fact, was found in Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb, dating back to approximately 3,300 years ago. In Arabic cultures, black cumin is known as Habbatul barakah, meaning the "seed of blessing." It is also believed that the Islamic prophet Mohammed said of it that it is "a remedy for all diseases except death."

Many of black cumin's traditionally ascribed health benefits have been thoroughly confirmed in the biomedical literature. In fact, since 1964, there have been 458 published, peer-reviewed studies referencing it.

We have indexed salient research, available to view on GreenMedInfo.com on our Black Seed (Nigella Sativa) page, on well over 40 health conditions that may be benefited from the use of the herb, including over 20 distinct pharmacological actions it expresses, such as:

Analgesic (Pain-Killing)
Anti-Bacterial
Anti-Inflammatory
Anti-Ulcer
Anti-Cholinergic
Anti-Fungal
Ant-Hypertensive
Antioxidant
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Bronchodilator
Gluconeogenesis Inhibitor (Anti-Diabetic)
Hepatoprotective (Liver Protecting)
Hypotensive
Insulin Sensitizing
Interferon Inducer
Leukotriene Antagonist
Renoprotective (Kidney Protecting)
Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitor

These 22 pharmacological actions are only a subset of a far wider number of beneficial properties intrinsic to the black seed. While it is remarkable that this seed has the ability to positively modulate so many different biological pathways, this is actually a rather common occurrence among traditional plant medicines.

Our project has identified over 1600 natural compounds with a wide range of health benefits, and we are only in our first 5 years of casual indexing. There are tens of thousands of other substances that have already been researched, with hundreds of thousands of studies supporting their medicinal value (MEDLINE, whence our study abstracts come, has over 600,000 studies classified as related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine).

Take turmeric, for example. We have identified research indicating its value in over 600 health conditions, while also expressing over 160 different potentially beneficial pharmacological actions. You can view the quick summary of over 1500 studies we have summarized on our Turmeric Research page, which includes an explorative video on turmeric. Professional database members are further empowered to manipulate the results according to their search criteria, i.e. pull up and print to PDF the 61 studies on turmeric and breast cancer. This, of course, should help folks realize how voluminous the supportive literature indicating the medicinal value of natural substances, such as turmeric and black seed, really is.

Black seed has been researched for very specific health conditions.

Some of the most compelling applications include:

Type 2 Diabetes: Two grams of black seed a day resulted in reduced fasting glucose, decreased insulin resistance, increased beta-cell function, and reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human subjects.[ii]
Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Black seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple eradication therapy.[iii]

Epilepsy: Black seeds were traditionally known to have anticonvulsive properties. A 2007 study with epileptic children, whose condition was refractory to conventional drug treatment, found that a water extract significantly reduced seizure activity.[iv]

High Blood Pressure: The daily use of 100 and 200 mg of black seed extract, twice daily, for 2 months, was found to have a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension.[v]

Asthma: Thymoquinone, one of the main active constituents within Nigella sativa (black cumin), is superior to the drug fluticasone in an animal model of asthma.[vi] Another study, this time in human subjects, found that boiled water extracts of black seed have relatively potent antiasthmatic effect on asthmatic airways.[vii]

Acute Tonsillopharyngitis: characterized by tonsil or pharyngeal inflammation (i.e. sore throat), mostly viral in origin, black seed capsules (in combination with Phyllanthus niruri) have been found to significantly alleviate throat pain, and reduce the need for pain-killers, in human subjects.[viii]

Chemical Weapons Injury: A randomized, placebo-controlled human study of chemical weapons injured patients found that boiled water extracts of black seed reduced respiratory symptoms, chest wheezing, and pulmonary function test values, as well as reduced the need for drug treatment.[ix]

Colon Cancer: Cell studies have found that black seed extract compares favorably to the chemoagent 5-fluoruracil in the suppression of colon cancer growth, but with a far higher safety profile.
  • Animal research has found that black seed oil has significant inhibitory effects against colon cancer in rats, without observable side effects.[xi]
MRSA: Black seed has anti-bacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.[xii]

Opiate Addiction/Withdrawal: A study on 35 opiate addicts found black seed as an effective therapy in long-term treatment of opioid dependence.[xiii]

Sometimes the biblical reference to 'faith the size of a mustard seed moving mountains' comes to mind in connection with natural substances like black seeds. After all, do seeds not contain within them the very hope for continuance of the entire species that bore it? This super-saturated state of the seed, where life condenses itself down into an intensely miniaturized holographic fragment of itself, promising the formation of future worlds within itself, is the very emblem of life's immense and immortal power.

If we understand the true nature of the seed, how much life (past, present and future) is contained within it, it will not seem so far-fetched that it is capable of conquering antibiotic resistant bacteria, healing the body from chemical weapons poisoning, or stimulate the regeneration of dying insulin-producing beta cells in the diabetic, to name but only a fraction of black seed's experimentally-confirmed powers.

Moving the mountain of inertia and falsity associated with the conventional concept of disease, is a task well-suited for seeds and not chemicals. The greatest difference, of course, between a seed and a patented synthetic chemical (i.e. pharmaceutical drug), is that Nature (God) made the former, and men with profit-motives and a deranged understanding of the nature of the body made the latter.

The time, no doubt, has come for food, seeds, herbs, plants, sunlight, air, clean water, and yes, love, to assume once again their central place in medicine, which is to say, the art and science of facilitating self-healing within the human body. Failing this, the conventional medical system will crumble under the growing weight of its own corruption, ineptitude, and iatrogenic suffering (and subsequent financial liability) it causes. To the degree that it reforms itself, utilizing non-patented and non-patentable natural compounds with actual healing properties, a brighter future awaits on the horizon. To the degree that it fails, folks will learn to take back control over their health themselves, which is why black seed, and other food-medicines, hold the key to self-empowerment.

References:________________________________________
Domestication of plants in the Old World (3 ed.). Oxford University Press. 2000. p. 206. ISBN 0-19-850356-3.
[ii] Abdullah O Bamosa, Huda Kaatabi, Fatma M Lebdaa, Abdul-Muhssen Al Elq, Ali Al-Sultanb. Effect of Nigella sativa seeds on the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Oct-Dec;54(4):344-54. PMID: 21675032
[iii] Eyad M Salem, Talay Yar, Abdullah O Bamosa, Abdulaziz Al-Quorain, Mohamed I Yasawy, Raed M Alsulaiman, Muhammad A Randhawa. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul-Sep;16(3):207-14. PMID: 20616418
[iv] Javad Akhondian, Ali Parsa, Hassan Rakhshande. The effect of Nigella sativa L. (black cumin seed) on intractable pediatric seizures. Med Sci Monit. 2007 Dec;13(12):CR555-9. PMID: 18049435
[v] Farshad Roghani Dehkordi, Amir Farhad Kamkhah. Antihypertensive effect of Nigella sativa seed extract in patients with mild hypertension. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2006 Apr;39(4):421-9. Epub 2006 Apr 3. PMID: 18705755
[vi] Rana Keyhanmanesh, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mohammad Javad Eslamizadeh, Saeed Khamneh, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi. The effect of thymoquinone, the main constituent of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and white blood cell count in lung lavage of sensitized guinea pigs. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Oct 29;126(1):102-7. Epub 2009 Aug 8. PMID: 19711253
[vii] M H Boskabady, N Mohsenpoor, L Takaloo . Antiasthmatic effect of Nigella sativa in airways of asthmatic patients. Phytomedicine. 2010 Feb 8. Epub 2010 Feb 8. PMID: 20149611
[viii] M Dirjomuljono, I Kristyono, R R Tjandrawinata, D Nofiarny. Symptomatic treatment of acute tonsillo-pharyngitis patients with a combination of Nigella sativa and Phyllanthus niruri extract. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jun;46(6):295-306. PMID: 18541126
[ix] Mohammad H Boskabady, Javad Farhadi. The possible prophylactic effect of Nigella sativa seed aqueous extract on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests on chemical war victims: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Nov;14(9):1137-44. PMID: 18991514
  • Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima. Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xi] Elsayed I Salim, Shoji Fukushima . Chemopreventive potential of volatile oil from black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seeds against rat colon carcinogenesis. Nutr Cancer. 2003;45(2):195-202. PMID: 12881014
[xii] Abdul Hannan, Sidrah Saleem, Saadia Chaudhary, Muhammad Barkaat, Muhammad Usman Arshad. Anti bacterial activity of Nigella sativa against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Jul-Sep;20(3):72-4. PMID: 19610522
[xiii] Sibghatullah Sangi, Shahida P Ahmed, Muhammad Aslam Channa, Muhammad Ashfaq, Shah Murad Mastoi . A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: Nigella sativa 500 mg. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 2008 Apr-Jun;20(2):118-24. PMID: 19385474

Source: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/black-seed-remedy-everything-death

Survival101- thank you so much for posting! Awesome info!
- Yowbarb

Survival101

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #99 on: March 11, 2013, 11:54:06 AM »

I was very disappointed when Amazon wanted to sell the 'Black Cumin or Black Seed' for $20/lb. I thought, there should be better pricing than that...so, after a few inquiries, here is what I found. I've bought from Nuts.com before and usually had really good service and quality of product.

Black Caraway Seeds

Nuts.com - Order now, we'll ship today!

1. 1lb bag — $4.99$ = 4.99/lb
2. 5lb bag — $24.20 = $4.84/lb
3. 25lb case — $89.75 = $3.59/lb (bulk - not individually packaged)
Plus, shipping costs. (Reduced rates for 100# or more orders)

Quantity:123456789more...$4.99 Add to cart »See our bulk discounts

Certified: Kosher

Aromatic with a peppery bite, black caraway seeds are enjoyed as a spice in Egyptian, Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines and is often used in spice blends, breads, and vegetable dishes.

Middle Easterners refer to black caraway seeds as "the blessed seed" because of its healing properties. Studies show that the spice may strengthen and stimulate the immune system and act as an anti-histamine, anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. Some recent studies even point to its ability to prevent some toxic side effects of cancer treatments and slow cancer growth.

King Tutankhamen's tomb contained black caraway oil, of paramount importance to the ancient Egyptians. Both Hippocrates and the Greek physician Dioskorides recommended black caraway extensively as a remedy, and it was also reputedly used by Cleopatra. It can be found in the Old Testament, where it's called "black seed." And the Prophet Muhammad underlined its therapeutic qualities, stating, "Hold on to use of the black seed, for it has a remedy for every illness, except death."

Yup, this 'seems' to be the right one...!

Survival101

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #100 on: March 19, 2013, 05:37:32 AM »

I was very disappointed when Amazon wanted to sell the 'Black Cumin or Black Seed' for $20/lb. I thought, there should be better pricing than that...so, after a few inquiries, here is what I found. I've bought from Nuts.com before and usually had really good service and quality of product.

Black Caraway Seeds

Nuts.com - Order now, we'll ship today!

1. 1lb bag — $4.99$ = 4.99/lb
2. 5lb bag — $24.20 = $4.84/lb
3. 25lb case — $89.75 = $3.59/lb (bulk - not individually packaged)
Plus, shipping costs. (Reduced rates for 100# or more orders)

Quantity:123456789more...$4.99 Add to cart »See our bulk discounts

Certified: Kosher

Aromatic with a peppery bite, black caraway seeds are enjoyed as a spice in Egyptian, Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines and is often used in spice blends, breads, and vegetable dishes.

Middle Easterners refer to black caraway seeds as "the blessed seed" because of its healing properties. Studies show that the spice may strengthen and stimulate the immune system and act as an anti-histamine, anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. Some recent studies even point to its ability to prevent some toxic side effects of cancer treatments and slow cancer growth.

King Tutankhamen's tomb contained black caraway oil, of paramount importance to the ancient Egyptians. Both Hippocrates and the Greek physician Dioskorides recommended black caraway extensively as a remedy, and it was also reputedly used by Cleopatra. It can be found in the Old Testament, where it's called "black seed." And the Prophet Muhammad underlined its therapeutic qualities, stating, "Hold on to use of the black seed, for it has a remedy for every illness, except death."

Yup, this 'seems' to be the right one...!

Has anyone looked further at the Black Caraway, that I posted a few days ago, which Nuts.com carries...? Wouldn't want anyone to miss out on this super cure-all/heal-all. Seems to me, it's a 'deal' that can't be beat...what an amazing product to have set aside in our B.O.B or just plain start using immediately.

JKB

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #101 on: March 19, 2013, 05:54:48 PM »
Thanks S101.  I'm ordering some!
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #102 on: March 20, 2013, 10:42:26 PM »
The black seeds... which I am sure are used a lot in classic breads from Germany Eastern Europe and in Jewish baking.
- Yowbarb


https://drfugawe.wordpress.com/2011/08/09/americas-contribution-to-the-worlds-rye-breads-classic-jewish-rye/

Survival101

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #103 on: March 21, 2013, 05:58:31 AM »

Ahh, great post and recipe... Thanks, Yowbarb...

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #104 on: March 21, 2013, 08:15:05 AM »
I recently suffered with a terrible sore throat, which lasted for several months, and progressively got worse to the point where I could not sleep at night. It turned out I had post nasal drip, why I do not know, never had anything like this ever before.

 Finally after researching on the web, I started gargling several times a day with Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey, and miraculously after a couple of days the sore throat was almost completely healed.

Recipe:  3 tablespoons Apple Cider Honey  (I used the Braggs vinegar with the "mother" in it.)
              1 tablespoon honey
               1/4 cup of warm water.

If anyone has a cure for post nasal drip, I want to hear about it.  The pharmacist had nothing to recommend at all.  I have tried antihistamines to no avail.
           
Stir well, and gargle in small increments.  I did this several times a day.  Worked great!