NativeMom72 - THE DIVINE FEMININE > Teach Your Children Well

Passing on skills to your children

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Linda:
I have been trying in the last couple years to teach my two daughers some of my traditional skills, and ones that will come in handy should we lose our comfortable convienences.  I taught them home canning, (one daughter was open to it, one thought it was way too much work). But they were still exposed, and I feel it's at least inbedded in their mind somewhere. I also taught them fermenting and sprouting.

My husband and I are working with our youngest son this summer he is starting his own garden at his house. We have also shown him how to make and use a rain barrel. So those are a few of the things we have done. Oh my husband has shown all his boys how to build simple stuff with wood and use different tools. Every thing matters. We also have taken our kids camping in the past, so they learned the art of a campfire and tent life. We never did own a camper, i quit going because we constantly got rained on! ;D  I came from a family of hunters and fisherman, so I have some of that ingrained in me as well. I can pluck a mean duck, and skin a rabbit. :D Just kidding!

I was wondering if any of you have ideas, or have spent time passing on your wisdom and survival skills to your kids.



Pbutter72:
That is wonderful, Linda!

I have little boy and we've been gardening and sprouting--We're also working on some simple tasks like sewing and hand-washing clothes.
He also wants to make a Macana (a traditional Taino war club). I've worked with wood before so it'll be our little side project this summer!

Blessings
pB

Linda:
Thats great PB, kids always remember things like that. Plus it's the joy of spending time together and creating.


take care,
Linda

Yowbarb:

--- Quote from: Linda on April 19, 2010, 01:19:24 PM ---I have been trying in the last couple years to teach my two daughers some of my traditional skills, and ones that will come in handy should we lose our comfortable convienences.  I taught them home canning, (one daughter was open to it, one thought it was way too much work). But they were still exposed, and I feel it's at least inbedded in their mind somewhere. I also taught them fermenting and sprouting.

My husband and I are working with our youngest son this summer he is starting his own garden at his house. We have also shown him how to make and use a rain barrel. So those are a few of the things we have done. Oh my husband has shown all his boys how to build simple stuff with wood and use different tools. Every thing matters. We also have taken our kids camping in the past, so they learned the art of a campfire and tent life. We never did own a camper, i quit going because we constantly got rained on! ;D  I came from a family of hunters and fisherman, so I have some of that ingrained in me as well. I can pluck a mean duck, and skin a rabbit. :D Just kidding!

I was wondering if any of you have ideas, or have spent time passing on your wisdom and survival skills to your kids.

--- End quote ---

Linda I really feel you are wise to do these things.
My kids have been exposed to some outdoor or rural living for a time and one of the four daughters
seemed to naturally take to canning (up in Portland OR at the time).  Son learned to camp out and shoot from his father... kids all took turns shooting a gun and I have... we are a long ways from really prepared. At least they do have the memory of being up aobut 8500 feet on the Colorado land and roughing it up there a little bit. They had it luxurious compared to when I was young and went to the Colorado place. At first just tents. We kept our perishables in the creek in a black iron box. Water was cold enough even in summer. We had a brick outdoor oven and top stove made by my Grandma I think. I plucked the wild grouse a couple times. My dad shot them and mom and I prepared them. They were so delicious! already tasted like sage from what they ate. We fished for trout. Kind of silly but my dad had to bait thehook for me. I throew in the line and pulled out one after another. Probably now I could deal with baiting the hook, hehe. My uncle killed deer and we had venison. Grandma Vina from Missouri had homesteaded it and went up there to camp alone up through age 80. She lived 94 years...
Also in WA state kids would remember me chopping wood and hauling water from a well and the pot bellied wood - burning stove we had. We had a little trailer in the WA woods. (Repeating myself here...hehe.)
As far as recent experiences or teaching not much...

Never went up to the Colo place in winter. My dad and brother went there one time in the 1930s. They had to snowshoe in. Across Strawberry Creek was a pack of wolves just standing looking at them. In the cabin they made a fire in the fireplace and brewed coffee. Dad told me they put the hot tin cups onto the wooden table; turned around, cups had frozen to the table. They were fairly young and tough... no one ever tried going up there in wintertime again. - Yowbarb

Willsorr75:
I hope this is as encouraging to everyone as it is for me.

I am not afraid of tomorrow for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
 
 
Everything I need to know, I learned from Noah's Ark.
 
ONE: Don't miss the boat.
 
TWO: Remember that we are all in the same boat!
 
THREE: Plan ahead. It wasn't raining when Noah built the Ark.
 
FOUR: Stay fit. When you're 60 years old, someone may ask you to do something really big.
 
FIVE: Don't listen to critics; just get on with the job that needs to be done.
 
SIX: Build your future on high ground.
 
SEVEN: For safety's sake, travel in pairs.
 
EIGHT: Speed isn't always an advantage. The snails were on board with the cheetahs.
 
NINE: When you're stressed, float awhile.
 
TEN: Remember, the Ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic by professionals.
 
ELEVEN: No matter the storm, when you are with God, there's always a rainbow waiting.
 
 
Most people walk in and out of your life, but FRIENDS leave footprints in your heart

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