Author Topic: Natural Beauty  (Read 7511 times)

Yowbarb

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Natural Beauty
« on: August 22, 2013, 08:24:35 PM »
http://articles.latimes.com/2012/apr/21/health/la-he-fruits-vegetables-20120421
Beauty might be a matter of dietary makeup
Cherry lips? Peachy skin? Study indicates eating more fruits and vegetables can enhance looks.

April 21, 2012|By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
   
   
Please don't take this wrong. You look absolutely fine the way you are. It's just that ... well, with a little work, you might look even better.
We're not talking plastic surgery. Just the daily grind of buckling down and trying to eat better. Fresh from the March issue of the journal PLOS ONE comes word that scarfing down a few extra fruits and vegetables — yes, those again — could give you a significant leg up in the attractiveness department

Scientists have known for a while that the same pigments that give fruits and vegetables their color —carotenoids — can accumulate in your skin and give it color too. What they didn't know was this: How many fruits and vegetables do you have to eat for how long in order for people to notice the difference in your coloring? And what, if anything, will people think of the difference?

Researchers at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland did two studies to try to find out. In the first, they analyzed natural changes in the fruit and vegetable intake of 35 undergraduates who filled out questionnaires about their diet three times: at an initial session, three weeks later and again three weeks after that.

On those same three occasions, researchers measured the students' skin color in terms of lightness, redness and yellowness using a spectrophotometer — a machine designed to do that sort of thing. (To be included in the study, students could not have a recently acquired tan from sun, salon or chemical product, and they could not be wearing facial makeup.)

The researchers didn't ask the students to make any changes in what they ate. And they didn't betray any special interest in any particular foods. But during the six weeks, some students spontaneously increased their produce consumption, and such increases were significantly associated with increased redness, yellowness and overall darkness of skin color. From the machine's perspective anyway.
But that didn't mean mere human beings could detect any difference or would like what they saw if they could.

So the researchers did another study. This time they showed 24 undergrads pictures of two men and two women that had been manipulated color-wise to correspond to how they would look if they ate various quantities of fruits and vegetables.

Students were asked to choose between pairs of faces — 22 were created for each face — according to which looked healthier or, in a separate task, more attractive.

On average, a difference of about 2.9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day was enough for the students to discriminate on the basis of healthy appearance, with more servings associated with looking healthier. Similarly, about 3.3 servings a day was enough for them to discriminate on the basis of attractiveness — with more servings associated with better looks.

There you have it: 3.3 more servings a day of fruits and vegetables and watch what happens.
...when you consider that the recommended quota of fruits and vegetables for someone consuming 2,000 calories is nine servings a day not including potatoes. And a serving isn't very big: about half a cup.

........................

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2013, 09:02:07 PM »
The most beautiful person (female) I ever met was from Thailand. She was a tourist on the street who stopped me and asked me if I had an extra diaper for her baby. (I was pushing my first baby girl in her stroller.)  I mentioned how healthy and beautiful she looked; she said "in Thailand we eat a lot of fruit."
Lately I was thinking I wonder if there really is a connection, fruit and the beauty of the skin...Well yes there is. I mean you could not see a pore. Absolutely flawless skin and obviously a very healthy and intelligent person.

Below are just some inspirational images of creatively presented fruits.  :)
- Yowbarb



http://thai-creations.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Bird-Butterfly-Fruit-Basket-Carving-506x413.jpg

http://drdeclutterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/food-carved-watermelon.jpg

http://drdeclutterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/food-carved-watermelon.jpg



http://www.sixthseal.com/images/langkawi/fruit%20basket.jpg

Photo from Everything In Thailand
http://thr33mushrooms.blogspot.com/2012/06/5-colors-of-fruits-and-vegetables.html
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 09:06:01 PM by Yowbarb »

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 01:01:09 PM »
Great Thread  :)

I have found an all natural face scrub that has two simple ingredients:

Baking Soda and Lemon juice!

The recipe called for
  • 2 tablespoons of baking soda
  • 1/2 lemon
Add the baking soda into a small bowl, squeeze in the lemon juice,  then mix.
Apply the paste onto your face and leave on for a few minutes for beginners/sensitive skin and up to 10 mins once you get used to the "tingle"

And boy does it tingle!

Wash your face with a warm water and feel so shiny.
My skin was a little red at first but it went away in a few minutes.

I saw a recipe calling for adding a couple of drops of Tea Tree Oil which can be found in the link below:

http://cupcakesandcoffeebreaks.com/2013/03/diy-beauty-lemon-baking-soda-face-mask/

Hope this is Helpful!

~pB

“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 09:12:42 PM »
Hello All!

I found this information interesting!
How to reduce facial hair without the use of wax or tweezers...



or if you cannot find these ingredients or if you are running low, you can learn how to "thread" away your unwanted hair:

How to Thread Your Eyebrows

http://www.wikihow.com/Thread-Your-Eyebrows

« Last Edit: September 06, 2013, 07:40:23 PM by pbutter72 »
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2013, 12:03:20 AM »
[butter72,
Wow, this looks like a good idea! We might have a day when we are not going to be able to walk down the street and find waxing available.  ;)
Looks like an appealing recipe, too. 

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2013, 04:38:54 PM »
Hello Everyone!

I am going to put myself out there a little and admit that I have more than a few grays on my head. Actually they are coming in a bit "Lilly Munster"-ish which is kind of cool but several years ago I chose to dye them black... I found that years of the harmful chemical dyes have caused a such a strain on my hair making it brittle. So after some research, I decided to go for 100% natural dyes. I found that if I use a henna paste then use a indigo paste, I can get a dye that is close to black.

I settled on the Hannah Natural dyes which I purchased from Amazon and they were pretty affordable just under $4 each box. Each box contains two packs of dry powder herbs, one pair of gloves, one plastic shower cap and simple instructions



I then followed the instructions, well to tell you the truth.. I applied the henna on one day and indigo the next. The reason for this, is the setting time-- for henna it is 90min to 2hours and for indigo it was "just" 1hr to 90min.

**disclaimer 1--please test on your skin if you are sensitive**
**disclaimer 2-- they do stain so be careful of clothing and porous surfaces**

The instructions for both powders are the same :

  • Put on the gloves provided.
  • Empty the packet in a clean, dry bowl.
  • Add water and mix the powder into a
    thick, ketchup- like consistency.
  • Mix well with a wooden, plastic ladle.

I applied the henna mix which had a slight earthy scent and quickly placed the shower cap over my head. I did the same for the indigo a day later, but unlike the henna, the latter mixture smelled what I could only describe as burning spinach  ;) so I do recommend a window cracked open for this one. Both took a little while to rinse, especially the henna, but I was glad with the results!

Below are the actual photos I took of the process:



Besides dyeing hair, there are other benefits with using these all natural products:

  • Helps to boost your hair growth and makes it lively.
  • Fights infections on your scalp.
  • Treats dandruff and improves scalp health.

And for how to grow your own henna:

http://www.hennapage.com/henna/encyclopedia/growing/seeds.html

How to grow your own indigo (in this case, Japanese indigo):

http://www.sheeptoshawl.com/indigo.html

Hope this was helpful!

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 08:42:38 AM »
Hello Everyone!

I am going to put myself out there a little and admit that I have more than a few grays on my head. Actually they are coming in a bit "Lilly Munster"-ish which is kind of cool but several years ago I chose to dye them black... I found that years of the harmful chemical dyes have caused a such a strain on my hair making it brittle. So after some research, I decided to go for 100% natural dyes. I found that if I use a henna paste then use a indigo paste, I can get a dye that is close to black.

I settled on the Hannah Natural dyes which I purchased from Amazon and they were pretty affordable just under $4 each box. Each box contains two packs of dry powder herbs, one pair of gloves, one plastic shower cap and simple instructions



I then followed the instructions, well to tell you the truth.. I applied the henna on one day and indigo the next. The reason for this, is the setting time-- for henna it is 90min to 2hours and for indigo it was "just" 1hr to 90min.

**disclaimer 1--please test on your skin if you are sensitive**
**disclaimer 2-- they do stain so be careful of clothing and porous surfaces**

The instructions for both powders are the same :

  • Put on the gloves provided.
  • Empty the packet in a clean, dry bowl.
  • Add water and mix the powder into a
    thick, ketchup- like consistency.
  • Mix well with a wooden, plastic ladle.

I applied the henna mix which had a slight earthy scent and quickly placed the shower cap over my head. I did the same for the indigo a day later, but unlike the henna, the latter mixture smelled what I could only describe as burning spinach  ;) so I do recommend a window cracked open for this one. Both took a little while to rinse, especially the henna, but I was glad with the results!

Below are the actual photos I took of the process:



Besides dyeing hair, there are other benefits with using these all natural products:

  • Helps to boost your hair growth and makes it lively.
  • Fights infections on your scalp.
  • Treats dandruff and improves scalp health.

And for how to grow your own henna:

http://www.hennapage.com/henna/encyclopedia/growing/seeds.html

How to grow your own indigo (in this case, Japanese indigo):

http://www.sheeptoshawl.com/indigo.html

Hope this was helpful!

~pB

pbutter, wow! This is really useful info - and guess what, I am going to try this.  :) My Mother was a brunette too and she wasn't very old when she got her first gray hair. 25-26. Same thing happened to me. My hair is brown-black.
Mother got a streak right down the center of her head when she was only about 42. I didn't think it looked so bad but she felt like a freak with it so she made a drastic change. In order to cover up that streak, she felt she had to go blonde. Back in those days I don't think many women knew about dark henna dyes.
It's often problematic trying to get it dark enough but your ideas sound great.
Thanks for the great info you post here.
 ;)
- Yowbarb

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2014, 11:06:57 PM »
Thank you Barb for sharing!

Yes, I have been using these natural hair dyes several weeks now and they work very well! I also feel that the henna is helping to strengthen my hair  :)

In a search for more helpful ways to strengthen hair naturally and to prevent hair loss, I have come across this useful site that lists some home remedies:

Onion and garlic

The element sulphur increases the production of collagen which in turn helps the hair to grow. Onion and garlic are rich sources of sulphur and this explains why they have been used in traditional medicines for regrowth of hair.

Chop the onion into fine pieces and squeeze the juice out. Apply to the scalp and leave on for about 15 minutes; then rinse with a mild shampoo. Crush a few cloves of garlic, add in a little coconut oil and boil for a few minutes. When this mix cools down to feel warm to the touch, apply it on the scalp with a little massaging action. Repeat this treatment two to three times a week for best results.

Coconut

When it comes to caring for your hair, coconut provides a host of ingredients that naturally condition and promote growth of hair. The milk of the coconut contains proteins, essential fats and minerals such as potassium and iron; using it regularly can reduce the breakage of hair. Coconut oil also carries the same rich ingredients and it helps to make the hair stronger right from the root, through the shaft to the tip. Regular use of this oil to massage the scalp has a protective action against hair loss.

Grate coconut and squeeze out the milk by mixing in a little water. Apply this to the specific area where you notice thinning or balding. Allow to stay overnight and the next morning, rinse off with water. Read about other oils which help prevent hair loss.

Henna

Known for long as a natural hair colour and conditioner in the Asian countries, henna has a major role to play in strengthening hair. When combined with mustard oil, it works even better.

Take about 250 ml of mustard oil in a tin can; add in about 60 g of washed and dried henna leaves. Boil the mixture until the leaves get totally burnt and then filter the oil using muslin cloth. Cool and store the oil in an airtight container and use it to massage hair on a regular basis.

Some people also use a hair renewal pack that consists of 1 cup of the dry powder of henna leaves mixed with half a cup of curd. Apply this to the hair and allow to dry, and then wash with cool water and a mild shampoo. If you desire beautiful hair, try these other home-made packs henna hair packs. 

Hibiscus

Coconut oil and hibiscus are the secrets to the thick mane of hair we observe in people living in Kerala, India. Hibiscus has rejuvenating properties – it nourishes hair, prevents premature greying and also helps cure dandruff. Regular use of the flowers can help prevent hair loss too.

Crush a few flowers of hibiscus and mix with sesame oil or coconut oil to make a fine paste. Apply this to the scalp and hair, leave on for a few hours and then rinse with cool water and a mild shampoo.

Amla

Packed with vitamin C and rich in antioxidants, amla is the perfect solution for most hair loss woes. Besides applying to the scalp, it is also helpful to consume it on a regular basis because the vitamin C is good for your body.

Crush the amla fruit to extract a juice or buy the amla powder available at an herbal store. Add 2 teaspoons of the juice or the powder into an equal quantity of the juice freshly squeezed from a lime. Mix well, apply to the scalp and leave it to dry; then rinse using warm water. Also read other benefits of amla for your hair and skin.

Egg

Eggs are another rich source of sulphur; they also contain a lot of protein and minerals such as selenium, iodine, phosphorus, iron and zinc. This makes it an excellent promoter of hair regrowth especially when combined with olive oil.

Take the white of one egg and mix in a teaspoon of olive oil. Beat to give a paste-like consistency and apply to the entire scalp and hair. Keep it on for about 15 to 20 minutes and then rinse with cool water and a mild shampoo. You can reap in benefits of egg by making other home-made egg hair packs too.


(source:)
http://health.india.com/beauty/home-remedies-for-hair-loss-that-actually-work/



Hope this is helpful!

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2014, 08:22:35 AM »
pbutter, what an awesome collection of info!  ;)

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2014, 07:16:14 AM »
pbutter, what an awesome collection of info!  ;)

Thank you  :)

I have found this and wanted to share:

Ancient Native American Beauty Secrets

*article link http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2014/02/ancient-native-american-beauty-secrets.html

There are many ingredients in modern beauty products that were used by Native Americans. The ancient elders discovered the skin care and beauty benefits of plants like aloe vera and jojoba, hundreds of years ago. Here are some interesting plants used for healthy skin and beauty.

Aloe Vera

Native Americans used aloe vera to sooth and heal the skin, as well as to hydrate and protect it from extreme climates in areas like dry deserts. It was also used to treat sunburn and for soap.

Bearberry

A remedy for an itchy scalp. A tea was made from this evergreen shrub and mixed with grease and boiled cattle hoofs to use as a salve for an itchy, scaly scalp, baby rashes and skin sores.


Blue Corn

Corn was very important in ancient Native American life and still is today. Blue corn was a food staple of many Native American tribes, including the Hopi, Pueblo, Navajo and Zuni for hundreds of years. In addition to being used as food, it was also used for religious ceremonies like the naming ceremonies of babies, and marriage and funeral rituals. Corn was actually considered a deity in some cultures and a clan symbol for certain tribes. For the Hopi it represented the Eastern rising sun and the beginning of life and wisdom.

Called flour corn, blue corn is coarser than yellow or white corn and is used for flours and cornmeal. Many Native Americans used ground corn to cleanse and purify the skin. It was rubbed onto the skin before ceremonies to rid the body of impurities. Ground corn also acts as an exfoliator, ridding the skin of dead cells thus encouraging cell renewal.


Creeping Juniper


Juniper root for shiny locks. The berries from this evergreen scrub (also called creeping cedar) were made into a tea that was used as a wash for skin problems. Juniper root was also soaked in water to wash the horses, making their coats shiny. It’s now used in hair care products for shiny and healthy hair.

Fireweed

Winter skin protection. The inner stem of the root was dried and powdered and rubbed onto the hands and face in winter to protect the skin from the cold. (It was also used to waterproof rawhide.)


Prickly Pear

Cactus for skin hydration. An anti-inflammatory, the leaves of the prickly pear were used to make a moisturizer to protect the skin from the sun. It also speeds up cellular turnover leading to improved skin texture and appearance.


Saw Palmetto

Saw Palmetto was used by Native Americans for hair, scalp and skin care. Due to its ability to balance hormones in the body, it was used by Native American women to get rid of facial hair. It is now believed saw palmetto regulates excessive hair growth in women by suppressing DHT production in the body (a hormone produced by testosterone).


Sweetgrass

This flat-leafed bladed grass is considered sacred. It is smoked to purify individuals and their surroundings, and is used in ceremonies. It is even handled in a special way and with respect due to its spiritual powers. Some Native American women decorated their hair with sweetgrass. As a wash, sweetgrass was used to treat windburn and chapped skin. The tea can also be used as a hair tonic to make the hair shiny and fragrant.


Wild Mint

Wild Mint for hair and skin. The Cheyenne Indians in Montana used a decoction of the wild mint plant as hair oil. The Thompson Indians of British Columbia used the whole plant soaked in warm water to make a solution that was used in hair dressing. Mint was also used in bath water to alleviate itchy skin.


Wild Rose Bush

A mash of rose hips was made for skin problems. Now cosmetic companies use rose hips oil in creams and lotions to sooth the skin, as well as in anti-aging face creams, because it is thought that rose hips oil can reverse wrinkle formation.


Yarrow

Yarrow for Fragrant Hair. Native Americans used an infusion of the leaves from this strong-scented perennial plant as a hair wash. The Okanagan Indians of British Columbia mixed the leaves and stems with white clematis (a perennial with bright yellow flowers) and witch’s broom branches to make a shampoo.


Yucca

Yucca for hair growth. The yucca plant was used by several Native American tribes to encourage hair growth and to prevent baldness. The roots of young yucca plants were used for shampoo. The crushed roots were soaked in water to make a hair wash. Other methods involved peeling the bark of the root, which was rubbed in a pan of shallow water to make suds to rub into the hair and scalp. Yucca was also used as a hair wash for newborns by the Zuni Indians to help their hair grow healthy and strong.

Sources: Native American Ethnobotany Database/University of Michigan-Dearborn
Exploring Kainai Plants and Culture/Galileo Educational Network



~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

enlightenme

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2014, 05:14:39 PM »
Thanks pbutter 72, Great Post!

NativeMom72

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2014, 10:11:32 AM »
Thanks pbutter 72, Great Post!

Thank you Enlightenme  :)

It is my hope many on the forum could benefit from this info-- some of these ancient plants are easy to grow, like yarrow and mint!

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2014, 10:13:23 AM »
pbutter, what an awesome collection of info!  ;)

Thank you  :)

I have found this and wanted to share:

Ancient Native American Beauty Secrets

*article link http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2014/02/ancient-native-american-beauty-secrets.html

There are many ingredients in modern beauty products that were used by Native Americans. The ancient elders discovered the skin care and beauty benefits of plants like aloe vera and jojoba, hundreds of years ago. Here are some interesting plants used for healthy skin and beauty.

Aloe Vera

Native Americans used aloe vera to sooth and heal the skin, as well as to hydrate and protect it from extreme climates in areas like dry deserts. It was also used to treat sunburn and for soap.

Bearberry

A remedy for an itchy scalp. A tea was made from this evergreen shrub and mixed with grease and boiled cattle hoofs to use as a salve for an itchy, scaly scalp, baby rashes and skin sores.


Blue Corn

Corn was very important in ancient Native American life and still is today. Blue corn was a food staple of many Native American tribes, including the Hopi, Pueblo, Navajo and Zuni for hundreds of years. In addition to being used as food, it was also used for religious ceremonies like the naming ceremonies of babies, and marriage and funeral rituals. Corn was actually considered a deity in some cultures and a clan symbol for certain tribes. For the Hopi it represented the Eastern rising sun and the beginning of life and wisdom.

Called flour corn, blue corn is coarser than yellow or white corn and is used for flours and cornmeal. Many Native Americans used ground corn to cleanse and purify the skin. It was rubbed onto the skin before ceremonies to rid the body of impurities. Ground corn also acts as an exfoliator, ridding the skin of dead cells thus encouraging cell renewal.


Creeping Juniper


Juniper root for shiny locks. The berries from this evergreen scrub (also called creeping cedar) were made into a tea that was used as a wash for skin problems. Juniper root was also soaked in water to wash the horses, making their coats shiny. It’s now used in hair care products for shiny and healthy hair.

Fireweed

Winter skin protection. The inner stem of the root was dried and powdered and rubbed onto the hands and face in winter to protect the skin from the cold. (It was also used to waterproof rawhide.)


Prickly Pear

Cactus for skin hydration. An anti-inflammatory, the leaves of the prickly pear were used to make a moisturizer to protect the skin from the sun. It also speeds up cellular turnover leading to improved skin texture and appearance.


Saw Palmetto

Saw Palmetto was used by Native Americans for hair, scalp and skin care. Due to its ability to balance hormones in the body, it was used by Native American women to get rid of facial hair. It is now believed saw palmetto regulates excessive hair growth in women by suppressing DHT production in the body (a hormone produced by testosterone).


Sweetgrass

This flat-leafed bladed grass is considered sacred. It is smoked to purify individuals and their surroundings, and is used in ceremonies. It is even handled in a special way and with respect due to its spiritual powers. Some Native American women decorated their hair with sweetgrass. As a wash, sweetgrass was used to treat windburn and chapped skin. The tea can also be used as a hair tonic to make the hair shiny and fragrant.


Wild Mint

Wild Mint for hair and skin. The Cheyenne Indians in Montana used a decoction of the wild mint plant as hair oil. The Thompson Indians of British Columbia used the whole plant soaked in warm water to make a solution that was used in hair dressing. Mint was also used in bath water to alleviate itchy skin.


Wild Rose Bush

A mash of rose hips was made for skin problems. Now cosmetic companies use rose hips oil in creams and lotions to sooth the skin, as well as in anti-aging face creams, because it is thought that rose hips oil can reverse wrinkle formation.


Yarrow

Yarrow for Fragrant Hair. Native Americans used an infusion of the leaves from this strong-scented perennial plant as a hair wash. The Okanagan Indians of British Columbia mixed the leaves and stems with white clematis (a perennial with bright yellow flowers) and witch’s broom branches to make a shampoo.


Yucca

Yucca for hair growth. The yucca plant was used by several Native American tribes to encourage hair growth and to prevent baldness. The roots of young yucca plants were used for shampoo. The crushed roots were soaked in water to make a hair wash. Other methods involved peeling the bark of the root, which was rubbed in a pan of shallow water to make suds to rub into the hair and scalp. Yucca was also used as a hair wash for newborns by the Zuni Indians to help their hair grow healthy and strong.

Sources: Native American Ethnobotany Database/University of Michigan-Dearborn
Exploring Kainai Plants and Culture/Galileo Educational Network



~pB

Such wonderful information!  That photo is great too...
Thank You,  :)
Barb T.

Yowbarb

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Re: Natural Beauty
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2017, 12:11:28 AM »
http://alternativa-za-vas.com/en/index.php/clanak/article/manuka-honey

Anti-acne mask

Apply manuka honey every night on the affected area, and leave it until the morning. Repeat this every day until you see an improvement. This is also useful against any other type of skin problem.

Moisturizing facial mask

Clean your face, moisturize it gently and lubricate it with manuka honey. After twenty minutes, rinse your face. This mask is suitable for all skin types.


Yowbarb

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