Author Topic: Annunaki, discussions of  (Read 1106 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30535
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Annunaki, discussions of
« on: January 19, 2014, 03:26:44 PM »
I know there are posts about the Annunaki elsewhere on this forum.
Not sure where so here this is.

http://xfacts.com/sumerian_culture.html 

http://xfacts.com/x.htm

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30535
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Annunaki, discussions of
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2014, 03:36:28 PM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anunnaki

This article is about the Sumerian gods. For a role-playing game The Anunnaki as depicted in The 12th Planet, see Zecharia Sitchin.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zecharia_Sitchin

For other uses, see Anunnaki (disambiguation).

The Anunnaki (also transcribed as: Anunna, Anunnaku, Ananaki and other variations) are a group of deities in ancient Mesopotamian cultures (i.e. Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian). The name is variously written "da-nuna", "da-nuna-ke4-ne", or "da-nun-na", meaning something to the effect of "those of royal blood"[1] or "princely offspring".[2] According to The Oxford Companion to World Mythology, the Anunnaki "are the Sumerian deities of the old primordial line; they are chthonic deities of fertility, associated eventually with the underworld, where they became judges. They take their name from the old sky god An (Anu).[3]

Their relation to the group of gods known as the Igigi is unclear – at times the names are used synonymously but in the Atra-Hasis flood myth the Igigi are the sixth generation of the Gods who have to work for the Anunnaki, rebelling after 40 days and replaced by the creation of humans.[4]

Jeremy Black and Anthony Green offer a slightly different perspective on the Igigi and the Anunnaki, writing that "lgigu or Igigi is a term introduced in the Old Babylonian Period as a name for the (ten) "great gods". While it sometimes kept that sense in later periods, from Middle Assyrian and Babylonian times on it is generally used to refer to the gods of heaven collectively, just as the term Anunnakku (Anuna) was later used to refer to the gods of the underworld. In the Epic of Creation, it is said that there are 300 lgigu of heaven."[5]

The Anunnaki appear in the Babylonian creation myth, Enuma Elish.[6] In the late version magnifying Marduk, after the creation of mankind, Marduk divides the Anunnaki and assigns them to their proper stations, three hundred in heaven, three hundred on the earth. In gratitude, the Anunnaki, the "Great Gods", built Esagila, the splendid: "They raised high the head of Esagila equaling Apsu. Having built a stage-tower as high as Apsu, they set up in it an abode for Marduk, Enlil, Ea." Then they built their own shrines.

The Annunaki are mentioned in The Epic of Gilgamesh when Utnapishtim tells the story of the flood. The seven judges of hell are called the Annunaki, and they set the land aflame as the storm is approaching.[7]

According to later Assyrian and Babylonian myth, the Anunnaki were the children of Anu and Ki, brother and sister gods, themselves the children of Anshar and Kishar (Skypivot and Earthpivot, the Celestial poles), who in turn were the children of Lahamu and Lahmu ("the muddy ones"), names given to the gatekeepers of the Abzu (House of Far Waters) temple at Eridu, the site at which the creation was thought to have occurred. Finally, Lahamu and Lahmu were the children of Tiamat (Goddess of the Ocean) and Abzu (God of Fresh Water).

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30535
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Annunaki, discussions of
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2014, 03:45:35 PM »
Yowbarb Note: I have eliminated some of the criticisms of Sitchin. Read atahe entire article at the link below. Excerpts from the Wikipedia article on Zecharia Sitchin
.................................................................................................

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zecharia_Sitchin

Early life

Sitchin was born in the Azerbaijan SSR, but was raised in Mandatory Palestine. He received a degree in economics from the University of London, and was an editor and journalist in Israel, before moving to New York in 1952. While working as an executive for a shipping company, he taught himself Sumerian cuneiform and visited several archaeological sites.
Similar to earlier authors such as Immanuel Velikovsky and Erich von Däniken, Sitchin advocated hypotheses in which extraterrestrial events supposedly played a significant role in ancient human history.

According to Sitchin's interpretation of Mesopotamian iconography and symbology, outlined in his 1976 book The 12th Planet and its sequels, there is an undiscovered planet beyond Neptune that follows a long, elliptical orbit, reaching the inner solar system roughly every 3,600 years. This planet is called Nibiru (although Jupiter was the planet associated with the god Marduk in Babylonian cosmology).[5] According to Sitchin, Nibiru (whose name was replaced with MARDUK in original legends by the Babylonian ruler of the same name in an attempt to co-opt the creation for himself, leading to some confusion among readers) collided catastrophically with Tiamat (a goddess in the Babylonian creation myth the Enûma Eliš), which he considers to be another planet once located between Mars and Jupiter. This collision supposedly formed the planet Earth, the asteroid belt, and the comets. Sitchin states that when struck by one of planet Nibiru's moons, Tiamat split in two, and then on a second pass Nibiru itself struck the broken fragments and one half of Tiamat became the asteroid belt. The second half, struck again by one of Nibiru's moons, was pushed into a new orbit and became today's planet Earth.

According to Sitchin, Nibiru (called "the twelfth planet" because, Sitchin claimed, the Sumerians' gods-given conception of the Solar System counted all eight planets, plus Pluto, the Sun and the Moon) was the home of a technologically advanced human-like extraterrestrial race called the Anunnaki in Sumerian myth, who Sitchin states are called the Nephilim in Genesis. He wrote that they evolved after Nibiru entered the solar system and first arrived on Earth probably 450,000 years ago, looking for minerals, especially gold, which they found and mined in Africa. Sitchin states that these "gods" were the rank-and-file workers of the colonial expedition to Earth from planet Nibiru.

Sitchin wrote that Enki suggested that to relieve the Anunnaki, who had mutinied over their dissatisfaction with their working conditions, that primitive workers (Homo sapiens) be created by genetic engineering as slaves to replace them in the gold mines by crossing extraterrestrial genes with those of Homo erectus.[6][7] According to Sitchin, ancient inscriptions report that the human civilization in Sumer, Mesopotamia, was set up under the guidance of these "gods", and human kingship was inaugurated to provide intermediaries between mankind and the Anunnaki (creating the "divine right of kings" doctrine). Sitchin believes that fallout from nuclear weapons, used during a war between factions of the extraterrestrials, is the "evil wind" described in the Lament for Ur that destroyed Ur around 2000 BC. Sitchin states the exact year is 2024 BC.[8] Sitchin says that his research coincides with many biblical texts, and that biblical texts come originally from Sumerian writings.

Influence

Since the release of his first book The 12th Planet in 1976, now in its 45th printing, Sitchin wrote seven other books as part of his Earth Chronicles series, as well as six other companion books, all of which are still in print as of 2012. Sitchin's books sold millions of copies worldwide and been published in more than 25 languages.[9] New York Times reporter Corey Kilgannon noted that despite academic dismissal of his work, Sitchin had "a devoted following of readers".[3]

Critic Michael Heiser called Sitchin "arguably the most important proponent of the ancient astronaut hypothesis over the last several decades".[10] Sitchin was a frequent guest on the Coast to Coast AM radio show, which in 2010 presented Sitchin with a lifetime achievement award.[11] Gods of the New Millennium author Alan F. Alford admits he initially became "infatuated" with Sitchin's hypotheses but later became a critic of Sitchin's interpretations of myth.[12]

According to some writers, Sitchin's ideas along with those of Erich von Däniken may have influenced the beliefs of the religious sect of Raëlism,[13][14] and writer Mark Pilkington sees the mythology of Japan's Pana Wave religious group as rooted in Sitchin's The 12th Planet and its sequels.[15]

The 1994 movie Stargate, directed by Roland Emmerich, and the 2009 video game The Conduit drew some conceptual inspiration from Sitchin's ideas,[16][17] while screenwriter Roberto Orci says the villains of the film Cowboys & Aliens were inspired by Sitchin's conceptualization of the Anunnaki as gold-mining aliens.[18]

—[26]

Bibliography[edit]

Earth Chronicles volumes[edit]
1.The 12th Planet, New York: Stein and Day, 1976, ISBN 0-8128-1939-X
2.The Stairway to Heaven, 1980, Avon Books (Bear & Company, 1992, ISBN 0-939680-89-0; HarperCollins, 2007, ISBN 0-06-137920-4)
3.The Wars of Gods and Men, 1985, Avon Books (Bear & Company, 1992, ISBN 0-939680-90-4)
4.The Lost Realms, Avon Books, 1990, ISBN 0-380-75890-3
5.When Time Began, 1993, (HarperColins, 2007, ISBN 0-06-137928-X, ISBN 978-0-06-137928-4)
6.The Cosmic Code, Avon Books, 1998, ISBN 0-380-80157-4
7.The End of Days: Armageddon and Prophecies of the Return, William Morrow/HarperCollins, 2007, ISBN 978-0-06-123823-9

Companion volumes[edit]
##Genesis Revisited: Is Modern Science Catching Up With Ancient Knowledge?, (Avon Books, 1990, ISBN 0-380-76159-9)
##Divine Encounters: A Guide to Visions, Angels and Other Emissaries, Avon Books, 1995, ISBN 0-380-78076-3
##The Lost Book of Enki: Memoirs and Prophecies of an Extraterrestrial god, Bear & Company, 2001, ISBN 1-59143-037-2
##The Earth Chronicles Expeditions, Bear & Company, 2004, ISBN 978-1-59143-076-6
##Journeys to the Mythical Past, Bear and Company, 2007 ISBN 978-1-59143-080-3
##The Earth Chronicles Handbook, Bear & Company, 2009, ISBN 978-1-59143-101-5
##There Were Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA, (Bear & Company), 2010, ISBN 978-1-59143-121-3
##The King Who Refused to Die: The Anunnaki and The Search for Immortality, Bear & Company, 2013, ISBN 978-1-59143-177-0

DVDs[edit]
##Are We Alone in the Universe? (based on Genesis Revisited), documentary, 1978 (2003 DVD release)[34]
##An Evening with Zecharia Sitchin, lecture and slide presentation, 1997
##A Talk From The Heart! lecture and slide presentation, 2006
##Signs of the Return, lecture and slide presentation, 2009
##2012—the End of Days? lecture and slide presentation, 2010
##Zecharia at 90—Farewell Address, lecture, 2010