Author Topic: Tai Chi  (Read 3298 times)

Linda

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Tai Chi
« on: May 13, 2010, 05:28:37 AM »
Science discovers how Tai Chi works
Scientist have been able to discover why this ancient but simple set of exercises provides such healing benefits to the body. Traditional exercise helps us to loose weight and build muscle. Whenever we exercise, our bodies produces chemicals that are not produced when we are still. Most exercise causes the body to damage some muscle. When this is repaired the muscle grows back stronger. The chemicals produced by the body is the medicine that allows the muscle to heal.

When Tai Chi is practiced, the movements are so gentle that muscle isn
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2010, 05:56:28 AM »
Science discovers how Tai Chi works
Scientist have been able to discover why this ancient but simple set of exercises provides such healing benefits to the body. Traditional exercise helps us to loose weight and build muscle. Whenever we exercise, our bodies produces chemicals that are not produced when we are still. Most exercise causes the body to damage some muscle. When this is repaired the muscle grows back stronger. The chemicals produced by the body is the medicine that allows the muscle to heal.

When Tai Chi is practiced, the movements are so gentle that muscle isn

Linda

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2010, 06:02:34 AM »
Barb, I am actually learning some of the moves in a chair (that works if your balance gives you a problem). My friend who is teaching me some of the movements actually teaches them in a senior center along with Art for healing, she is an quite amazing women. She has found even in people in wheel chairs have increased energy and feel better doing these movements. Great stuff!

Linda 8)
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Linda

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2010, 07:16:06 AM »

Great video teaching chair movements.

http://espanol.video.yahoo.com/watch/1617622/5460711

Linda :)
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Ed Douglas

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2010, 01:14:21 PM »
As a practitioner of the martial arts, I have enjoyed Tai Chi  as a supplement to my other arts. You will find it to be totally invigorating, and my skin would tingle after a session. That, and I figured that if anyone ever attacked me in slow motion.....

Ed Douglas

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2010, 08:23:05 PM »
To tell you the truth, I had a very spiritual experience while doing a tai Chi form. It is called "wind horse",or liung ta(sp). What an experience. I described a feeling I had during a strange moment, and there was a Tibetan Buddhist in the class, and she told me that the Shambala describes it as the wind horse. She said I was extremely fortunate to have that happen to me.

NativeMom72

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2014, 11:43:13 AM »
Great Topic!

I love Tai Chi and it really does help Body, Mind and Spirit :)
Some places that they may offer classes:

  • local community centers
  • martial arts schools
  • private instructors (I would try to offer a barter or gather some friends to split costs)


And there is always internet resources like the youtube link that was offered earlier in this thread!

~pB
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Yowbarb

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2014, 09:56:22 AM »
Barb, I am actually learning some of the moves in a chair (that works if your balance gives you a problem). My friend who is teaching me some of the movements actually teaches them in a senior center along with Art for healing, she is an quite amazing women. She has found even in people in wheel chairs have increased energy and feel better doing these movements. Great stuff!

Linda 8)

Linda belated reply and thanks for posting this. Part of one of your previous posts got lost.
At that time we lost part of several posts and some topics and it was a bit of a chaos.

This is a very worthwhile Topic.  :)

- Barb Townsend

Yowbarb

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2014, 09:58:00 AM »
Great Topic!

I love Tai Chi and it really does help Body, Mind and Spirit :)
Some places that they may offer classes:

  • local community centers
  • martial arts schools
  • private instructors (I would try to offer a barter or gather some friends to split costs)


And there is always internet resources like the youtube link that was offered earlier in this thread!

~pB

pbutter72 thanks for the reminder!  ;)

I have a video and high time I started using it. I'm going on 70 and it would be a perfect art for me to practice.
 :)

Socrates

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Re: slow motion...
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2017, 12:07:10 PM »
That, and I figured that if anyone ever attacked me in slow motion.....
;D
I have dabbled in [chronologically] TaeKwonDo, Wing Chun kungfu, Aikido and Tai Chi. However, i have kept my eyes and ears open for deeper insights into these tactics through the years.

I once found this wonderful instructional manual on Aikido i am still interested in finding; i mention it because i see many similarities between Tai Chi Chuan and Aikido. Hell, mainly i consider the one stemming from China and the other from Japan [resp.]; they are very different but inherently different from the other martial arts in their main focus.

Having said that, there are more combative ways to approach Tai Chi and i have acquired 2 books that go into these aspects, i.e. Tai Chi as a violent art.
I feel such books give a more balanced [sic] view of such martial arts, making certain movements slow or paced while making others quick or forceful [i.e. not all movements slow].

One must always consider that the end result is influenced [if not afflicted] by cultural, historical and political motives and that common sense as well as intuition should always lead a student of the art.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2017, 05:56:21 PM »
Socrates I would also like to learn more about defensive arts...

Socrates

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Re: defensive arts
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2017, 06:09:30 PM »
Socrates I would also like to learn more about defensive arts...
Though there's really not much point to doing so if you can't throw a punch to begin with. I learned this the hard way, used my training to get in through this guy's defenses but accomplishing nothing.

I would advise anyone to train on a boxing bag. If you train, even a little, regularly [preferably every day], you will end up hitting many times harder than people who do not do so. Especially if you are already not strong to begin with, it is a must to get to be able to throwing a punch or kicking with some force.
Hang up both a good bag and an extra heavy one, like filled with sand. Just make sure you practice with training gloves when using the sand-filled one.
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ilinda

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Re: defensive arts
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2017, 05:08:40 PM »
Socrates I would also like to learn more about defensive arts...
Though there's really not much point to doing so if you can't throw a punch to begin with. I learned this the hard way, used my training to get in through this guy's defenses but accomplishing nothing.

I would advise anyone to train on a boxing bag. If you train, even a little, regularly [preferably every day], you will end up hitting many times harder than people who do not do so. Especially if you are already not strong to begin with, it is a must to get to be able to throwing a punch or kicking with some force.
Hang up both a good bag and an extra heavy one, like filled with sand. Just make sure you practice with training gloves when using the sand-filled one.
I think there is more than one way to "skin a cat".  In fact, if you are not already strong, then suddenly engaging with a punching bag could actually injure you if you are not careful.  I have injured and re-injured my shoulders by working on this farm, throwing boulders too heavy, etc.   But there are things so-called weaklings can do that require very little brute strength, but do require brute intellect (is there such a thing? lol).

Yowbarb, I have an old videotape about self-defense, with women in mind, IIRC.  There are many things a "weakling" can do to disable an attacker.  And yes, there would be a few situations where he/she might have a total advantage, but remember, when a big bully picks on a smaller woman, he is always expecting a screaming scardey cat. 

If I can find that video tape and it still plays, I'll make copious notes and either post it here or send it to you somehow. 

Socrates

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Re: defensive arts
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2017, 07:58:38 PM »
if you are not already strong, then suddenly engaging with a punching bag could actually injure you if you are not careful
If there is one thing age should have taught one, it is how to be careful. You always have to be careful. A boxer has to train 2 whole years before he can throw a punch with full force because it takes that long for the bones and ligaments in his hands and wrist to toughen up/thicken/strengthen. You think strong people can't hurt themselves?
Subtle tactics usually take years to master but punching a bag regularly will increase the power of your punches many times over in just a few months.

Weakness is always also a self-fulfilling prophecy: I am weak therefore i stay weak?
Strong or weak the wise thing to do is stay away from trouble and trouble makers and in troubled times to probably just stay away...
As i said, i have dabbled in many forms of self-defense and my own experience and insight is that the most efficient use of time and effort is punching a bag regularly. Mainly this is because people overestimate their ability to punch at all, while underestimating how much stronger their punch could become with some training. But grips and tricks, those take years to learn to do right.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Tai Chi
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2017, 09:51:02 PM »