Author Topic: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization  (Read 1756 times)

SocratesR

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'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« on: July 19, 2014, 01:46:29 AM »
The following extremely short selection of books is comprised of essential information for anyone who manages to survive TEOTWAWKI. Mankind will be thrown back into the stone age, just like our ancestors were, and it's up to individuals to make intelligent and informed choices that will benefit all of future mankind. Frankly, it's more about mankind than about individual survival, since billions will be effected by what survivors of TEOTWAWKI do today. What's one life compared to that? The books you manage to save for posterity could change the course of history; your survival is moot in that light. Suicide isn't appropriate but there's more at stake here than just survival.

We live in a paradoxical time in which internet offers information and sources of all ages and all places, while simultaneously mainstream culture treats internet as something that's only about porn, social media, and online shopping. The following list of books is based on decades of educational reading followed by 15 years of taking advantage of what internet has to offer. Therefore, to 99.99% of folks, it will seem strange. So i will explain each choice.

I have a carefully selected library that's the result of a lifetime [i'm nearly 50 now] of curiosity. It's about 5 meters in length, plus an Encyclopaedia Brittanica, a technical encyclopaedia, and a maritime encyclopedia. Of all of these books, i have chosen the following 8 books as the ones i would never leave behind. Having said that, there are books that i deem worthy of being on the list, but the contents thereof can be easily known by heart, like The Billings Method of how to naturally avoid pregnancy and be able to determine the gender of your children. However, since books are heavy and take the place of other essentials, i would leave such books behind in a pinch.
Now without further ado...

1: The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
2: The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
3: Thou Shalt Not Be Aware by Alice Miller
4: Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
5: The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
6: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
7: The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
8: Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz


The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
History may seem quaint knowledge and nothing essential, but knowledge of who and what we are, of mankind's true roots, is about knowing yourself. "Know thyself." It doesn't get more basic than that.
Zecharia Sitchin's unique life work shows us our true roots. The more than 50,000 Sumerian 6000 year old clay tablets prove that mankind is not alone on this planet, that our roots go back a few hundred thousand years [i.e. neither a creationist few thousand, nor evolutionary millions], and that Planet X has been common knowledge before. Fairly recent scientific research from various disciplines confirms things mentioned in The 12th Planet, like the fact that human DNA only goes back a few hundred thousand years. [This, btw, is why an eerily silence comes from the genetic community since the Human Genome Project was finished...]
If you don't know about mankind's history, all kinds of crazy ideas take the place of knowledge and understanding.

The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
A similar story applies to the matter of Hollow Earth, as clearly and comprehensively explained by father and son Taylor. I had researched the matter of Hollow Earth extensively before i ran into this book, and i had already accepted the truth of it as evident, but the depth of knowledge and understanding provided in this book clears up all kinds of questions one runs into in relation to hollow planets, like how can there be a miniature sun inside a planet?, how do they grow to be hollow?, and many others. It explains why all planets are spherical [contrary to small celestial objects], how come the Anunnaki (mentioned in The 12th Planet) discovered that Homo Erectus was already [!] a genetically modified being, how it could be that humans are fruitarians, and much much more.
Again, it's about knowing who and what we are.

Thou Shalt Not Be Aware by Alice Miller
The psychologist Alice Miller spent her life researching infant [not childhood, but infant!] traumas and how they effect adults. Mainstream psychology ignores her research, despite the many bestsellers she's put out, because her findings are contrary to politics and conventional culture's notions about humanity. Her research clearly argues how people often [the Milgram Experiment suggests that it applies to 75% of modern people!] lose contact with basic human feelings and are thereby able to commit genocide, torture, etc. Her research clearly suggests that if one would establish a truly humane society, one that might literally be called civilized, one would need to consciously and conscientiously consider the treatment of infants as primary. Babies that do not suffer through Black Pedagogics can then grow up to be courageous [especially, they're able to face confrontational truths], intelligent, and empathic.

Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
Through electricity and global trade mankind was able to get a grip on the periodic table of the elements. This is the foundation of modern society. Though mankind has only seen how technology has succeeded in serving the powerful and devastating the planet, if one were to acknowledge research like that of Alice Miller and allow mankind the time it needs to come to grips with sophisticated technology [which will never happen if Planet X comes by any time soon], technological advancements in the future could lead to a civilization, prosperity, and happiness as our generation can only dream of.
It's also a strategic point; if you would establish a culture that would not only embrace empathic and civilized society, one would do well to also have the technological superiority to keep barbaric humans at bay. I'm not talking weapons, but building big ships is also something that takes a whole lot more knowledge than people had in the last stone age.

The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
Spirituality is part of life. I have researched many spiritual teachings and teachers. IMHO there are no teachings that compare to that of Adi Da Samraj. It's personal of course. I'm just saying, i would bring along at least one of His books.

Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
All long-lived cultures in the world have a tradition of alcoholic beverages. To modern man this may sound evil or ignorant. Modern culture has a holier-than-thou approach towards alcoholic drinks, based on politics, history, and prejudice. However, if you can get over the culture you live in, you cannot but recognize that people haven't drunken alcoholic beverages because they were all (inherently and fundamentally) evil people [the pseudo-christian take on mankind], but for good reason. It should be understood that distilled alcohol is a relatively recent development of Arabic culture [and when liquor started getting abused, Islamic leaders discussed putting down the law to discourage drinking it; "it", in this case, being "the distilled alcohol" which is what is meant by the word "alcohol", of Arabic origin].
Buhner's book contains an incredible amount of herbal and medicinal lore. Considering the documentary How Beer Saved the World, the value and importance of alcoholic beverages is commonly utterly misunderstood and unknown but anyone interested in establishing a society that is complete and whole should know what they're doing and why.

The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
Buhner's herbal teachings are among the most complete and in depth in the world. In this book he offers one the understanding of how to establish your own herbal lore! It turns out that herbal knowledge the world over did not come about after centuries or millennia of trial and error, but rather is about knowing how to listen to the plant kingdom and learn from it. No herbal knowledge or book could ever be complete enough to encompass all the plants in your area, but if you're able to find out by yourself how to become a herbalist, that offers real knowledge, insight, and security.

Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz
Just as all long-lived cultures in the world have fermented drinks, they have all had things like cheese, sour kraut, kimchi, miso, etc. etc. etc. Of course it would be better to take the necessary bacterial cultures with you to your survival location, just like you would take any genetic information like seeds or animals, but if you at least know enough about how such things work, that will be a boon to future generations. Our generation suffers a lot from modern global culture, with radiation and pollution coming at us from all sides, and we would therefore  be severely remiss if we did not take advantage of what the global community has to offer us. Most ancient cultures only had one or two fermented foods, but we can take with us to a new world a whole range of options. But only if we save such information.


If i only had room for one book, i would bring Periodic Tales. If i could only bring 2 or 3, i would also take The 12th Planet and Thou Shalt not be Aware. It's a difficult choice, for it has to do with whether i personally survive or not; if i survive, the knowledge and principles in books like The 12th Planet and Thou Shalt not be Aware are well known to me and i can pass them on to others later. On the other hand, if i don't manage to survive myself, future generations are better served by Thou Shalt not be Aware, and The Billings Method than they are by knowledge they may never otherwise become mature enough to handle.
It would be best to put certain books in a very safe place as soon as possible, while i might keep other books with me, in case i end up at some other location.

If i had room or opportunity (but not enough for my library), here's a quick grab of books i would take as well:
- The Billings Method of Natural Family Planning by Dr. Evelyn Billings [since i could die but the book could live on]
- Born to Run by Christopher McDougall
- Mutual Aid by Peter Kropotkin
- The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin
- Reed's Sextant Simplified by Dag Pike
- Nature's Building Blocks by John Emsley
- Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman
- Earth Under Fire by Paul LaViolette
- more books by Adi Da Samraj, like The Method of the Siddhas

(Except for the last 2 mentioned books, i already have all of the others in my library, i.e. hard copy.)
As soon as possible i would like to continue working on a book i might call "Establishing Civilization" in which i would just put everything important and essential that's not in the books i have, or just a compilation of the most important information. I mean, i can't copy an entire book like these i have on the periodic table of the elements [Nature's Building Blocks & Periodic Tales], but the essence of books like The Billings Method can be compressed into just a few pages. My book's coming along but i don't have the opportunity to work on it right now. I hope to finish it asap. If i can have it printed myself, preferably on laminated paper [!], i might be able to take one single TEOTWAWKI 'bible' with me wherever i go. That's a dream i have, anyway.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2014, 07:57:33 AM by SocratesR »

NativeMom72

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Re: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2014, 04:40:20 PM »
The following extremely short selection of books is comprised of essential information for anyone who manages to survive TEOTWAWKI. Mankind will be thrown back into the stone age, just like our ancestors were, and it's up to individuals to make intelligent and informed choices that will benefit all of future mankind. Frankly, it's more about mankind than about individual survival, since billions will be effected by what survivors of TEOTWAWKI do today. What's one life compared to that? The books you manage to save for posterity could change the course of history; your survival is moot in that light. Suicide isn't appropriate but there's more at stake here than just survival.

We live in a paradoxical time in which internet offers information and sources of all ages and all places, while simultaneously mainstream culture treats internet as something that's only about porn, social media, and online shopping. The following list of books is based on decades of educational reading followed by 15 years of taking advantage of what internet has to offer. Therefore, to 99.99% of folks, it will seem strange. So i will explain each choice.

I have a carefully selected library that's the result of a lifetime [i'm nearly 50 now] of curiosity. It's about 5 meters in length, plus an Encyclopaedia Brittanica, a technical encyclopaedia, and a maritime encyclopedia. Of all of these books, i have chosen the following 8 books as the ones i would never leave behind. Having said that, there are books that i deem worthy of being on the list, but the contents thereof can be easily known by heart, like The Billings Method of how to naturally avoid pregnancy and be able to determine the gender of your children. However, since books are heavy and take the place of other essentials, i would leave such books behind in a pinch.
Now without further ado...

1: The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
2: The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
3: Thou Shalt Not Be Aware by Alice Miller
4: Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
5: The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
6: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
7: The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
8: Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz


The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
History may seem quaint knowledge and nothing essential, but knowledge of who and what we are, of mankind's true roots, is about knowing yourself. "Know thyself." It doesn't get more basic than that.
Zecharia Sitchin's unique life work shows us our true roots. The more than 50,000 Sumerian 6000 year old clay tablets prove that mankind is not alone on this planet, that our roots go back a few hundred thousand years [i.e. neither a creationist few thousand, nor evolutionary millions], and that Planet X has been common knowledge before. Fairly recent scientific research from various disciplines confirms things mentioned in The 12th Planet, like the fact that human DNA only goes back a few hundred thousand years. [This, btw, is why an eerily silence comes from the genetic community since the Human Genome Project was finished...]
If you don't know about mankind's history, all kinds of crazy ideas take the place of knowledge and understanding.

The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
A similar story applies to the matter of Hollow Earth, as clearly and comprehensively explained by father and son Taylor. I had researched the matter of Hollow Earth extensively before i ran into this book, and i had already accepted the truth of it as evident, but the depth of knowledge and understanding provided in this book clears up all kinds of questions one runs into in relation to hollow planets, like how can there be a miniature sun inside a planet?, how do they grow to be hollow?, and many others. It explains why all planets are spherical [contrary to small celestial objects], how come the Anunnaki (mentioned in The 12th Planet) discovered that Homo Erectus was already [!] a genetically modified being, how it could be that humans are fruitarians, and much much more.
Again, it's about knowing who and what we are.

Thou Shalt Not Be Aware by Alice Miller
The psychologist Alice Miller spent her life researching infant [not childhood, but infant!] traumas and how they effect adults. Mainstream psychology ignores her research, despite the many bestsellers she's put out, because her findings are contrary to politics and conventional culture's notions about humanity. Her research clearly argues how people often [the Milgram Experiment suggests that it applies to 75% of modern people!] lose contact with basic human feelings and are thereby able to commit genocide, torture, etc. Her research clearly suggests that if one would establish a truly humane society, one that might literally be called civilized, one would need to consciously and conscientiously consider the treatment of infants as primary. Babies that do not suffer through Black Pedagogics can then grow up to be courageous [especially, they're able to face confrontational truths], intelligent, and empathic.

Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
Through electricity and global trade mankind was able to get a grip on the periodic table of the elements. This is the foundation of modern society. Though mankind has only seen how technology has succeeded in serving the powerful and devastating the planet, if one were to acknowledge research like that of Alice Miller and allow mankind the time it needs to come to grips with sophisticated technology [which will never happen if Planet X comes by any time soon], technological advancements in the future could lead to a civilization, prosperity, and happiness as our generation can only dream of.
It's also a strategic point; if you would establish a culture that would not only embrace empathic and civilized society, one would do well to also have the technological superiority to keep barbaric humans at bay. I'm not talking weapons, but building big ships is also something that takes a whole lot more knowledge than people had in the last stone age.

The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
Spirituality is part of life. I have researched many spiritual teachings and teachers. IMHO there are no teachings that compare to that of Adi Da Samraj. It's personal of course. I'm just saying, i would bring along at least one of His books.

Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
All long-lived cultures in the world have a tradition of alcoholic beverages. To modern man this may sound evil or ignorant. Modern culture has a holier-than-thou approach towards alcoholic drinks, based on politics, history, and prejudice. However, if you can get over the culture you live in, you cannot but recognize that people haven't drunken alcoholic beverages because they were all (inherently and fundamentally) evil people [the pseudo-christian take on mankind], but for good reason. It should be understood that distilled alcohol is a relatively recent development of Arabic culture [and when liquor started getting abused, Islamic leaders discussed putting down the law to discourage drinking it; "it", in this case, being "the distilled alcohol" which is what is meant by the word "alcohol", of Arabic origin].
Buhner's book contains an incredible amount of herbal and medicinal lore. Considering the documentary How Beer Saved the World, the value and importance of alcoholic beverages is commonly utterly misunderstood and unknown but anyone interested in establishing a society that is complete and whole should know what they're doing and why.

The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
Buhner's herbal teachings are among the most complete and in depth in the world. In this book he offers one the understanding of how to establish your own herbal lore! It turns out that herbal knowledge the world over did not come about after centuries or millennia of trial and error, but rather is about knowing how to listen to the plant kingdom and learn from it. No herbal knowledge or book could ever be complete enough to encompass all the plants in your area, but if you're able to find out by yourself how to become a herbalist, that offers real knowledge, insight, and security.

Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz
Just as all long-lived cultures in the world have fermented drinks, they have all had things like cheese, sour kraut, kimchi, miso, etc. etc. etc. Of course it would be better to take the necessary bacterial cultures with you to your survival location, just like you would take any genetic information like seeds or animals, but if you at least know enough about how such things work, that will be a boon to future generations. Our generation suffers a lot from modern global culture, with radiation and pollution coming at us from all sides, and we would therefore  be severely remiss if we did not take advantage of what the global community has to offer us. Most ancient cultures only had one or two fermented foods, but we can take with us to a new world a whole range of options. But only if we save such information.


If i only had room for one book, i would bring Periodic Tales. If i could only bring 2 or 3, i would also take The 12th Planet and Thou Shalt not be Aware. It's a difficult choice, for it has to do with whether i personally survive or not; if i survive, the knowledge and principles in books like The 12th Planet and Thou Shalt not be Aware are well known to me and i can pass them on to others later. On the other hand, if i don't manage to survive myself, future generations are better served by Thou Shalt not be Aware, and The Billings Method than they are by knowledge they may never otherwise become mature enough to handle.
It would be best to put certain books in a very safe place as soon as possible, while i might keep other books with me, in case i end up at some other location.

If i had room or opportunity (but not enough for my library), here's a quick grab of books i would take as well:
- The Billings Method of Natural Family Planning by Dr. Evelyn Billings [since i could die but the book could live on]
- Born to Run by Christopher McDougall
- Mutual Aid by Peter Kropotkin
- The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin
- Reed's Sextant Simplified by Dag Pike
- Nature's Building Blocks by John Emsley
- Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman
- Earth Under Fire by Paul LaViolette
- more books by Adi Da Samraj, like The Method of the Siddhas

(Except for the last 2 mentioned books, i already have all of the others in my library, i.e. hard copy.)
As soon as possible i would like to continue working on a book i might call "Establishing Civilization" in which i would just put everything important and essential that's not in the books i have, or just a compilation of the most important information. I mean, i can't copy an entire book like these i have on the periodic table of the elements [Nature's Building Blocks & Periodic Tales], but the essence of books like The Billings Method can be compressed into just a few pages. My book's coming along but i don't have the opportunity to work on it right now. I hope to finish it asap. If i can have it printed myself, preferably on laminated paper [!], i might be able to take one single TEOTWAWKI 'bible' with me wherever i go. That's a dream i have, anyway.

Thank you for sharing this list of recommended books to carry along for the aftertime. It is a good subject to think about :)

I would add to my bag something for the children

Aesop's Fables

http://www.amazon.com/Aesops-Fables-Oxford-Worlds-Classics/dp/0199540756/ref=lh_ni_t?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Hans Christian Andersen: The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories (Anchor Folktale Library)

http://www.amazon.com/Hans-Christian-Andersen-Complete-Folktale/dp/0385189516/ref=pd_sim_b_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=08E2659G1RQ2XW402GNP

~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

steedy

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Re: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2014, 05:42:07 PM »
There are lots of good books for kids pbutter!  You could also add Grimm's Fairy Tales and Mother Goose to your list.

Yowbarb

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Re: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2014, 06:22:30 PM »
PButter72, I'm not sure if I had acknowledged your cool post on here. Good choices!
I miss you on here!  :)
- Yowbarb

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Re: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2015, 12:29:59 AM »
SocratesR thank you for your book list and many useful ideas...

Jimfarmer

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Re: 'bare necessity' books for establishing civilization
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2015, 08:58:28 AM »
Quote
Grimm's Fairy Tales and Mother Goose

Nah!  Too grim, mostly (pun intended), imbuing fear.